Decoction

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Turkish coffee beginning to boil. Decoction used to be the primary method of making coffee, though today most coffee is made by percolation.

Decoction is a method of extraction by boiling of dissolved chemicals from herbal or plant material, which may include stems, roots, bark and rhizomes. Decoction involves first mashing and then boiling in water to extract oils, volatile organic compounds and other chemical substances.[1] Decoction can be used to make herbal teas, teas, coffees, tinctures and similar solutions. Decoctions and infusions may produce liquids with differing chemical properties as the temperature/preparation difference may result in more oil-soluble chemicals in decoctions versus infusions. The process can also be applied to meats and vegetables to prepare bouillon or stock.[2]

A decoction is also the name for the resulting liquid. Although this method of extraction differs from infusion and percolation, the resultant liquids are often functionally similar.

Etymology[edit]

The term dates back to 1350–1400[3] from present participle stem of Latin decoquere (meaning to boil down), de "from" + coquere "to cook".[4]

Use[edit]

In brewing, decoction mashing is the traditional method where a portion of the mash is removed to a separate vessel, boiled for a time and then returned to the main mash, raising the mash to the next temperature step.

In herbalism, decoctions are usually made to extract fluids from hard plant materials such as roots and bark.[citation needed] To achieve this, the plant material is usually boiled for 8–10 minutes in water. It is then strained.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Biology-online.org
  2. ^ Courtine, Robert J.; et al., eds. (1988) [French edition published 1984]. Larousse Gastronomique (English ed.). p. 362. ISBN 0-600-32390-0. 
  3. ^ Dictionary.reference.com
  4. ^ Etymonline.com

External links[edit]