Deep Dark Canyon

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Deep Dark Canyon
Deep Dark Canyon.jpg
theatrical poster
Directed by
Produced by
  • Brandon Barrera
  • Scott Tree
  • Silver Tree
  • Kathy Weiss
Written by
  • Silver Tree
  • Abe Levy
Starring
Music by James Weston
Cinematography Dan Stoloff
Edited by Abe Levy
Production
  company
Secret Identity Productions
Distributed by Colorfast Pictures
Release date(s)
Running time 90 minutes
Country United States
Language English

Deep Dark Canyon is a 2012 American independent dramatic thriller film by husband and wife writer/director team Abe Levy and Silver Tree.[1] The film stars Ted Levine, Nick Eversman and Spencer Treat Clark. The film was originally called Lawless and was shot on location in the rural town of Guerneville, California.[2]

Synopsis[edit]

Nate (Spencer Treat Clark) and Skylar (Nick Eversman), sons of sheriff Bloom Towne (Ted Levine), are involved in the accidental death of Mayor Cavanaugh's son Dick in a hunting accident. Older brother Nate fired the deadly shot, but to protect him, younger Skylar, still a minor, takes the blame. Owning most of the town's businesses, the Cavanaugh family itself is wealthy and influential. In retaliation, the family uses their influence to have Skylar set to be tried as an adult, rather than as a minor. Desperate and filled with guilt, Nate breaks Skylar out of the county lock-up and, handcuffed together, the two escape into the local woods. Two deputies are killed in the escape and the Cavanaugh clan, deciding that the sheriff will be unable to act impartially, organize themselves into a search team with orders to shoot on sight. Sheriff Towne joins the search efforts in order to reach his sons before they are shot by others. He is forced to measure the major political debt he owes to the Mayor and the Cavanaugh family, against his oath to uphold the law and the love he has for his two sons.

Cast[edit]

Production[edit]

Originally titled Lawless, the project was shot in Sonoma County, California, primarily in locations in Guerneville and along the Russian River.[2] The film was renamed to avoid confusions with other films of the same title and to better reflect " the atmospheric, rural setting in which it takes place, namely Guerneville".[1]

Reception[edit]

Film Threat gave an overall positive review for the film, stating that all of the actors "turn in solid performances that keep the movie grounded in reality".[3] The Village Voice gave a mixed review, criticizing that the film "depletes itself with inter-location crosscutting" but that "Levine commands every scene he's in with great support from a subtle and soulful Martin Starr as his conflicted deputy".[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Howell, Daedalus (October 11, 2012). "The ‘Lawless’ land of movie names". Sonoma Magazine. Retrieved November 3, 2012. 
  2. ^ a b staff (October 12, 2012). "Sonoma County-made film ‘Deep Dark Canyon’ premieres Oct. 19". Press Democrat. Retrieved November 2, 2012. 
  3. ^ "Review: Deep Dark Canyon". Film Threat. Retrieved 2 November 2012. 
  4. ^ Kiefer, Jonathan. "Review: Deep Dark Canyon". Village Voice. Retrieved 2 November 2012. 

External links[edit]