Deer Park High School (Texas)

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Coordinates: 29°41′17″N 95°07′45″W / 29.6881°N 95.1292°W / 29.6881; -95.1292

Deer Park High School
Location
714 W. San Augustine
Deer Park, TX 77536

United States
Information
Type Public High School
Motto Preparing Today's Students for Tomorrow's Challenges.
Established 1931
School district Deer Park Independent School District
Principal Dr. Rhonda Kouba
Grades 9-12
Enrollment 4,090
Color(s)                     Maroon, Gold, Grey, and White
Athletics UIL 5A
Athletics conference 22-5A
Mascot Deer
Newspaper The Antler/The Antler Online
Yearbook The Deer
Information (832) 668-7200
Website

Deer Park High School, located in Deer Park, Texas, is a high school serving 3,780 students from grades 9-12 and is a part of the Deer Park Independent School District. The school consists of two separate campuses: Deer Park High School North Campus (Grade 9) and Deer Park High School South Campus (Grades 10-12).

Feeder schools[edit]

The high school is fed by Bonnette Junior High, Deepwater Junior High, Deer Park Junior High, and Fairmont Junior High.

Faculty[edit]

Deer Park School District has 842 teachers. Of those teaching in the district, 33% have advanced degrees.

Notable alumni[edit]

New construction to South Campus[edit]

During the end of the 2007 school year, Deer Park High School began remodeling the campus to better serve the student population. The construction included the addition of two new gymnasiums, 8 computer labs, a new cafeteria, a culinary arts lab and restaurant, science classrooms, a broadcast journalism studio, a new library and administrative spaces. The construction moved the main entrance to the school from the west side of the campus along Texas Avenue to the North Side of the building, along San Augustine Street.

Features of the campuses[edit]

Extracurricular activities are divided up between both North and South Campuses, with various sports and fine arts being centered at either campus. South Campus is home to Clyde Abshire Stadium, DPISD's 10,000-seat football and soccer stadium. The stadium is home to all of DPHS's football teams, as well as boys and girls soccer. South Campus also houses the school's softball field, as well as ten tennis courts, and four gyms. An extensive weight training room, natatorium, and sports medicine and physical therapy clinic are also housed on campus. North Campus is home to the district's baseball and track stadiums, as well as three gyms.

In 2008, USA Today cited Deer Park High School in a study about schools being exposed to toxic emissions from factories. The article said that the school's proximity to oil refineries along the Houston Ship Channel threatened its students with high levels of 1,3-Butadiene and other harmful gases.[1]

Fine arts[edit]

Deer Park High School features band, choir, dance, orchestra, and theatre as parts of its fine arts curriculum. In 2012, its production of The Rimers of Eldritch was a UIL One-Act Play state finalist. Once again in 2014, Deer Park made an appearance at the One-Act Play state finals with The Drowning Girls. In 2014 Deer Park sent multiple choir and Band students to All-State Choir. The school's drill team, The Deer Escorts, also compete in numerous competitions throughout the year and have recently been named Best in Show and Grand Champions.

For fine arts, both campuses feature band and choir Halls, dance studios, and theatre classrooms. Orchestra is centered only at South Campus. South Campus is home to the Deer Park High School Performing Arts Center (PAC). The PAC houses a 1500 seat proscenium theatre and 120 seat black box theatre. The PAC was built as an addition to the campus in 2001 to provide an additional performance space for the school and to allow for more technically complex shows, that the school's original auditorium could not hold. Annually the PAC is home to multiple UIL competitions for band, choir, and theatre. North Campus is home to Gaines Y. Mason Auditorium, 1400 seat theatre used for assemblies, award ceremonies, and freshmen choir, theatre, and dance performances.

Athletics[edit]

The Deer Park High School softball team was named state champion in both 2012 and 2014; they were a state finalist in 2013. The golf team was a state finalist in 2013 and placed third in the state in 2014. The boys and girls soccer teams were regional finalists in 2012, 2013, and 2014. The baseball team competed at the state level in 2013. The track and swim teams both sent representatives to state in 2012 and 2014. Bowling, fishing, tennis, cross country, basketball, volleyball, and football are also featured as part of the athletic program.

Other school groups[edit]

The school features a number of other competitive groups. The journalism department features five classes: yearbook, newspaper, photojournalism, broadcast journalism, and periodical print journalism. The Yearbook, The Deer, was founded in 1947 and has released its volume annually since its inception. In 2013, it was selected by Balfour Publishing, the company that produces the book for the school, as the 2014-2015 National Example book. A copy of the yearbook will be distributed to every high school publishing their yearbook with Balfour in 2015.

The Culinary Arts program at South Campus has competed against other schools in FCCLA Competitions. Deer Park High School has placed first every year in the State Competition since they began participating. In the 2012-2013 school year, they placed second but took first place in Region IV Competition.

The Antler, the school's newspaper, was founded in the 1950s. The Antler: Online, the school's digital news website, was launched in 2011. Three of its writers were named district champions in 2014. No Filter, the school's photography magazine, began circulation in 2013. The broadcast journalism group, DP News 42, began production in the early 2000s, and has been nominated for numerous Lone Star Education Emmys. The photojournalism staff serves all of the school's media groups. The school's culinary arts program has gained many awards since in founding in 2009, including several state placers and state titles.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Morrison, Blake; Brad Heath (2008-12-08). "Health risks stack up for school kids near industry". USA Today. p. 6A. 

External links[edit]