Degrassi: The Next Generation (season 3)

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Degrassi: The Next Generation (season 3)
DTNG season-3.jpg
Degrassi: The Next Generation Season 3 DVD
Country of origin Canada
No. of episodes 22
Broadcast
Original channel CTV (Canada)
Minimax (Central Europe)
The N (United States)
Original run 17 September 2003 (2003-09-17) – 5 April 2004 (2004-04-05)
Home video release
DVD release
Region 1 28 March 2006 (2006-03-28)
Region 4 13 April 2011 (2011-04-13)
Season chronology
← Previous
two
Next →
four

The third season of Degrassi: The Next Generation commenced airing in Canada on 17 September 2003, concluded on 5 April 2004 and contains twenty-two episodes. Degrassi: The Next Generation is a Canadian serial teen drama television series. This season depicts the lives of a group of high school freshman and sophomores as they deal with some of the challenges and issues teenagers face such as dysfunctional families, sex, homosexuality, homophobia, theft, self-harm, domestic violence, abortion, emancipation and relationships.

Every episode is named after a song from the 1980s.[1] Filming began on 26 May 2003, and ended in November 2003.[2]

The third season aired Wednesdays at 8:30 p.m. on CTV, a Canadian terrestrial television network, and premiered with a sixty-minute special, "Father Figure", which form the first two episodes of the season.[3] When the season returned to the schedules in January 2004 following a break over the Christmas period, it aired on Mondays at 8:30 p.m.[4][5] In the United States, it was broadcast on The N, a digital cable network aimed at teenagers and young adults. The season was released on DVD as a three disc boxed set on 28 March 2006 by Alliance Atlantis Home Entertainment in Canada, and by FUNimation Entertainment in the US.[6] Registered users of the Canadian and US iTunes Stores are also able purchase and download the season for playback on home computers and certain iPods.[7]

The season was watched by 669,000 viewers in Canada and became the most-watched domestic drama series, while in the US it averaged 250,000 viewers an episode. It won a total of five awards from the Directors Guild of Canada Awards, the Gemini Awards and the Young Artist Awards, and was described as "groundbreaking", "bold", and the show others in the same genre "should take a cue from", although that groundbreaking boldness caused two episodes of the season to be banned from US television screens for three years and when it was finally aired, it was rated "TV-14," even though more intense episodes still received Degrassi's usual "TV-PG" in the United States.

Cast[edit]

The third season features twenty actors who receive star billing with all fifteen of them returning from the previous season. Returning cast members include:

Joining the main cast are Stacey Farber and Adamo Ruggiero as Ellie Nash and Marco Del Rossi, who were introduced in recurring roles the previous season. Amanda Stepto and Andrea Lewis, who have been recurring for two seasons are promoted to the main cast as Spike Nelson and Hazel Aden. Stacie Mistysyn makes a permanent return to her Degrassi franchise role as Caitlin Ryan.

Introduced in recurring roles are Ephraim Ellis as Rick Murray, John Bregar as Dylan Michalchuk, Deanna Casaluce as Alex Nuñez, Mike Lobel as Jay Hogart, and Daniel Morrison as Chris Sharpe.[8] Alex Steele, Melissa DiMarco, Katie Lai, Linlyn Lue and Jennifer Podemski returns to play Angela Jeremiah, Daphne Hatzilakos, Kendra Mason, Ms. Kwan and Ms. Sauve, respectively.[9]

From Degrassi Junior High and Degrassi High, Cathy Keenan, Angela Deiseach and Maureen Deiseach reprises their roles as Liz O'Rourke, Erica Farrell and Heather Farrell for the opening episode, "Father Figure". Shane McKay was played by Jonathan Torrens rather than Bill Parrott, the original DJH actor,[10][11] and Neil Hope returns to play Wheels in the seventh episode, "Should I Stay or Should I Go?".

Crew[edit]

The season was produced by Epitome Pictures in association CTV. Funding was provided by The Canadian Film or Video Production Tax Credit and the Ontario Film and Television Tax Credit, the Canadian Television Fund and BCE-CTV Benefits, The Shaw Television Broadcast Fund, the Independent Production Fund, Mountain Cable Program, and RBC Royal Bank.[12][13]

The executive producers are Epitome Pictures' CEO and Degrassi: The Next Generation co-creator Linda Schuyler, and her husband, Epitome president Stephen Stohn. Degrassi: The Next Generation co-creator Yan Moore served as the creative consultant and David Lowe is the line producer. Aaron Martin is the executive story editor. At the beginning of the season James Hurst served as the story editor, with Shelley Scarrow as junior story editor; by the end of the season they had been promoted to senior story editor and story editor, respectively. Brandon Yorke also served as a story editor, and Nicole Demerse became a story editor midway though the season. The editor is Stephen Withrow, Stephen Stanley is the production designer, and the cinematographers are Gavin Smith, David Perrauit, and Phil Earnshaw.[14]

The writers for the season are Christine Alexiou, Tassie Cameron, Sean Carley, Craig Cornell, Nicole Demerse, James Hurst, Sean Jara, Aaron Martin, Yan Moore, Shelley Scarrow, Rebecca Schechter, Jana Sinyor, and Brendon Yorke. John Bell, Phil Earnshaw, Allan Eastman, Eleanore Lindo, Bruce McDonald, Andrew Potter, and Stefan Scaini directed the episodes.[14][15]

When production of season three began, someone with the username "ExecProducer" started a thread on the official Degrassi: The Next Generation website,[16] revealing production details, guest actors, scheduling information and DVD release details. He actually referred to himself as "Stephen Stohn" in one post, although this was not officially confirmed until the release of Degrassi: Generations - The Official 411 guidebook in 2005, when Stohn confirmed it was him.[17]

Reception[edit]

In Canada the third season of Degrassi: The Next Generation was the most-watched domestic drama amongst adults 18 to 49, and the most-watched domestic drama series overall.[18] It received an average of 669,000 viewers, an increase of 44% compared to season two.[19] In the US, the season averaged 250,000 viewers.[20]

Following season finale, the San Jose Mercury News said "If they [Everwood, The O.C., and One Tree Hill] want to be taken seriously, the shows could take a cue from Canadian drama Degrassi: The Next Generation, which ... addresses the same gritty teen issues without being far-fetched",[21] and Tim Goodman of the San Francisco Chronicle echoed that by adding "Degrassi: The Next Generation has cultivated a loyal audience by avoiding the sugar-coating niceties of old-school teen TV and by treating those 10- to 14-year-olds as, well, not adults per se, but definitely maturing viewers. Degrassi focuses on a high school with a disparate student body, with countless individual stories to tell (which is why the franchise has lasted this long). There's nothing corny or sweet about "Degrassi" as it boldly tackles everything from obesity to date rape, thongs to drugs".[22] Others, such as The Advocate gave praise and said the series was breaking new ground by depicting a gay romance between two teenaged boys.

Two of the episodes of season three were considered "too honest" for US viewers, as they portrayed a fourteen-year-old girl having an abortion, and having no regrets later, and The N refused to air the episodes. On the decision, The N said, "It's a serious episode and the summer [schedule] is all lighthearted",[23] but "unrelated to any policy position regarding abortion."[24] The refusal caused an uproar amongst the show's US fans, over 6000 of whom signed a petition calling the decision "unjust and asinine",[25] and even attracted the attention of newspapers and media in Canada and the US,[26] with The New York Times reporting on the portrayal of abortion on television.[24]

The season won a total of five awards and six more nominations from various bodies. At the 2004 Directors Guild of Canada Awards, "Holiday" won "Outstanding Achievement in a Television Series - Family" and garnered a nomination for Stephen Stanley for "Outstanding Achievement in Production Design - Television Series".[27] "Pride" won Aaron Martin, James Hurst and Shelley Scarrow the award for "Best Youth Script" at the Canadian Screenwriting Awards, given out annually by the Writers Guild of Canada,[28] and "Best Direction in a Children's or Youths' Program or Series" at the Gemini Awards. The series also won the Gemini for "Best Children's or Youth Fiction Program or Series". Jake Epstein was nominated for "Best Performance in a Children's or Youth Program or Series" for his acting in "Should I Stay or Should I Go?", and Shelley Scarrow, Nicole Demerse and James Hurst were nominated for "Best Writing for a Children's or Youth Program or Series" for "Accidents Will Happen".[29] The series received a nomination for "Outstanding Drama Series" at the 15th GLAAD Media Awards, which honor the media for their portrayal of the LGBT community and the issues that affect their lives.[30] Jake Epstein was nominated for "Best Performance in a TV Comedy Series Leading Young Actor" at the Young Artist Awards, Alex Steele was nominated for "Best Performance in a TV Comedy Series Young Actress Age Ten or Younger", and the show won "Best Family TV Series (Comedy or Drama)".[31]

Episodes[edit]

In the US, The N aired season three in two separate blocks as it had done with the second season. The first block of episodes aired between 3 October 2003 and 19 December 2003, and the second block from 4 June 2004 to 6 August 2004.[32] Episodes fourteen and fifteen, the "banned" episodes, were finally broadcast on 26 August 2006, three years after their original Canadian broadcast during an "Every Degrassi Episode Ever" Marathon.[33]

In Canada episode 313 "This Charming Man", aired before Christmas themed episode 311/312 "Holiday".

This list is by order of production, as they appear on the DVD.

No. in
season
No. in
series
Title Canadian airdate US airdate Production code
1–2 38–39 "Father Figure"[34] 17 September 2003 3 October 2003 301 & 302
The Simpson-Nelson household prepares for the arrival of the new baby, when Spike announces that she wants to have a home-birth. On the first day of the new school year, Emma becomes irritated that people keep mistaking her as Snake's daughter, so she decides to ditch school with Craig and find her real father, Shane McKay. When she does ultimately find him, she is not prepared for what she sees. Meanwhile, Spinner is having a hard time finding the "perfect" gift for Paige and decides to get her a new locker.
Note: Stacey Farber, Andrea Lewis, Stacie Mistysyn, Adamo Ruggiero and Amanda Stepto have promoted to series regular status. Christina Schmidt is absent from this episode. Sarah Barrable-Tishauer and Dan Woods are absent in Part 1. Daniel Clark, Ryan Cooley, Stacey Farber, Jake Goldsbie, Andrea Lewis, Melissa McIntyre, Stacie Mistysyn, Adamo Ruggiero and Cassie Steele are absent in Part 2.
3 40 "U Got the Look" 1 October 2003 10 October 2003 303
Sick of being perceived as "cute" and "adorable", Manny changes her image to "hot", which catches all the boys' attention but also creates problems between her, Emma and J.T. Joey becomes too involved with Craig's new band, which does not sit well with everyone.
Note: Stefan Brogren, Stacey Farber, Andrea Lewis, Christina Schmidt and Amanda Stepto are absent from this episode.
4 41 "Pride" Part One 8 October 2003 17 October 2003 304
The skeletons in Marco's closet are brought to the forefront when Ellie refuses to pretend to be his girlfriend any longer and he soon falls for Paige's gay brother, Dylan. Meanwhile, Snake suddenly develops a mysterious illness that is causing him spontaneous bleeding and dizziness.
Note: Sarah Barrable-Tishauer, Daniel Clark, Ryan Cooley, Jake Goldsbie, Stacie Mistysyn, Christina Schmidt and Dan Woods are absent from this episode.
5 42 "Pride" Part Two 15 October 2003 17 October 2003 305
Spinner tries to cut Marco out of his life after he learns that he is gay, and Marco wonders if he should keep it a secret from everyone else until an encounter with a group of homophobic guys shows him who his real friends are. Meanwhile, Snake gets sicker and finds out he has leukemia.
Note: Daniel Clark, Ryan Cooley, Jake Goldsbie, Melissa McIntyre, Stacie Mistysyn, Christina Schmidt and Dan Woods are absent from this episode.
6 43 "Gangsta Gangsta" 22 October 2003 24 October 2003 306
Sean starts hanging out with the bad kids in school which causes problems between him and Emma. Meanwhile, J.T. has been spending more time with Paige and the popular kids, leaving Toby behind.
Note: Stacey Farber, Aubrey Graham, Pat Mastroianni, Melissa McIntyre, Stacie Mistysyn, Adamo Ruggiero, Christina Schmidt, Cassie Steele and Amanda Stepto are absent from this episode.
7 44 "Should I Stay or Should I Go?" 29 October 2003 31 October 2003 307
Things are getting intense between Craig and Ashley when sex becomes a desire. When she tells him she loves him, Craig has a hard time saying it back, and writes her a song instead. Also, Joey takes a sick Snake out to go bowling, when they receive a surprise visit from an old friend.
Note: Daniel Clark, Ryan Cooley, Stacey Farber, Jake Goldsbie, Stacie Mistysyn and Dan Woods are absent from this episode.
8 45 "Whisper to a Scream" 5 November 2003 28 November 2003 308
Ellie is under a lot of pressure. Her dad is fighting overseas, her mother started drinking again and she is given an a chance to work for Caitlin. The stress causes Ellie to start cutting herself. Meanwhile, Terri receives roses from a secret admirer, and worries that it may be from Toby.
Note: Sarah Barrable-Tishauer, Stefan Brogren, Daniel Clark, Ryan Cooley, Aubrey Graham, Shane Kippel, Pat Mastroianni, Miriam McDonald, Amanda Stepto and Dan Woods are absent from this episode.
9 46 "Against All Odds" 12 November 2003 5 December 2003 309
With Sean and Emma officially broken up, Emma sets her sights on the new kid, Chris Sharpe while Manny tries to get Craig's attention. Meanwhile, Spinner is still a bit uneasy to be around Marco when he begins thinking Marco has a crush on him.
Note: Sarah Barrable-Tishauer, Stefan Brogren, Lauren Collins, Ryan Cooley, Jake Goldsbie, Andrea Lewis, Stacie Mistysyn, Christina Schmidt, Amanda Stepto and Dan Woods are absent from this episode.
10 47 "Never Gonna Give You Up" 19 November 2003 12 December 2003 310
While Terri is happy to have a new boyfriend in her life, Hazel and Paige become suspicious when she comes to school with cuts and bruises. Meanwhile, a rivalry develops between Spinner and J.T. after J.T. continually hangs out with Paige.
Note: Sarah Barrable-Tishauer, Daniel Clark, Stacey Farber, Jake Goldsbie, Pat Mastroianni, Miriam McDonald, Melissa McIntyre, Stacie Mistysyn and Amanda Stepto are absent from this episode.
11–12 48–49 "Holiday"[34] 17 December 2003 19 December 2003 311 & 312
With Christmas rapidly approaching, Craig finds himself slowly losing interest in Ashley while continuing to cheat on her with Manny, who soon has become a comfort for him. Craig doesn't know who he wants to be with more and continues to see them both behind each other's back, while also accepting the risk of losing both of them. Joey and Sydney find themselves increasingly serious, but Sydney's jealousy comes out when Joey begins spending a lot of time with Caitlin, who begins to develop feelings for him.
Note: Daniel Clark is absent from this episode. Stacey Farber and Christina Schmidt are absent in Part 1. Dan Woods is only heard and not seen in Part 1. Andrea Lewis, Miriam McDonald and Dan Woods are absent in Part 2.
13 50 "This Charming Man" 10 December 2003 4 June 2004 313
Chris and Emma finally become a couple, but when she thinks Sean and his friends are stealing things around Degrassi, Emma becomes obsessed with bringing them to justice. Paige, Spinner and Jimmy enroll in Driver's Ed, and Paige gets a crush on their instructor, Mr. Falcone.
Note: Sarah Barrable-Tishauer, Jake Epstein, Stacey Farber, Pat Mastroianni, Stacie Mistysyn, Adamo Ruggiero, Christina Schmidt and Cassie Steele are absent from this episode.
14 51 "Accidents Will HappenPart One 26 January 2004 26 August 2006 314
Fourteen year old, Manny worries that she might be pregnant with Craig's child after missing a period and having morning sickness. Meanwhile, Toby tries to join J.T. in the "in crowd" by promising Jimmy that he can hack into the school's database and change his low math grade.
Note: Sarah Barrable-Tishauer, Stefan Brogren, Daniel Clark, Pat Mastroianni, Stacie Mistysyn, Adamo Ruggiero and Christina Schmidt are absent from this episode.
15 52 "Accidents Will HappenPart Two 9 February 2004 26 August 2006 315
Manny and Craig decide to raise their baby but when they fail miserably at taking care of Spike and Snake's baby, Manny realizes she's not ready to be a mother at her age and considers having an abortion. Meanwhile, after Sean tells Liberty to get over J.T., she sets her sights on him.
Note: Stefan Brogren, Aubrey Graham, Andrea Lewis, Pat Mastroianni, Stacie Mistysyn, Adamo Ruggiero and Dan Woods are absent from this episode.
16 53 "Take on Me" 16 February 2004 11 June 2004 316
In homage to The Breakfast Club, Hazel, Ellie, Jimmy, Toby, and Sean are stuck in Mr. Raditch's Saturday detention and despite being in different cliques, they begin to bond.
Note: Sarah Barrable-Tishauer, Lauren Collins, Jake Epstein, Shane Kippel, Pat Mastroianni, Miriam McDonald, Melissa McIntyre, Stacie Mistysyn, Adamo Ruggiero, Christina Schmidt, Cassie Steele and Amanda Stepto are absent from this episode.
17 54 "Don't Dream It's Over" 23 February 2004 18 June 2004 317
Everyone is angry when Terri announces that she is back together with her ex who abused her. Terri resists taking Paige's advice and when Rick hurts her again, she ends up in the hospital. Ellie doesn't like how Sean treats Marco when they hang out together.
Note: Sarah Barrable-Tishauer, Ryan Cooley, Jake Epstein, Jake Goldsbie, Pat Mastroianni, Miriam McDonald, Cassie Steele and Amanda Stepto are absent from this episode.
18 55 "Rock & Roll High School" 8 March 2004 2 July 2004 318
Craig's band Downtown Sasquatch goes up against Ashley's Hell Hath No Fury for a chance to win a recording session. Meanwhile, Caitlin gets a crash course in parenting when she must care for Joey and Angie after he injures his back.

Special guest star: Chris Woodward (former Blue Jays starter).


Note: Daniel Clark, Ryan Cooley, Jake Goldsbie, Miriam McDonald, Christina Schmidt, Cassie Steele, Amanda Stepto and Dan Woods are absent from this episode.
19 56 "It's Raining Men" 15 March 2004 9 July 2004 319
Marco is prepared to go on his first date since coming out of the closet and sets his eyes on Dylan. Meanwhile, J.T. hosts a party after he stars in a commercial for french fries. However, the feedback is less than stellar due to the rather cheesy nature of it.
Note: Stefan Brogren, Jake Epstein, Stacey Farber, Pat Mastroianni, Melissa McIntyre, Stacie Mistysyn, Christina Schmidt, Amanda Stepto and Dan Woods are absent from this episode.
20 57 "I Want Candy" 22 March 2004 16 July 2004 320
Paige and Spinner skip school in order to visit a comatose Terri at the hospital and invite Ashley, who is still upset over her breakup with Craig. Emma finds Simpson's will and panics in fear that the chemotherapy failed.
Note: This episode marks the final appearance of Christina Schmidt, although she is still credited as a cast member for the duration of the season. Daniel Clark, Jake Epstein, Stacey Farber, Jake Goldsbie, Aubrey Graham, Andrea Lewis, Pat Mastroianni, Stacie Mistysyn and Cassie Steele are absent from this episode.
21 58 "Our House" 29 March 2004 30 July 2004 321
Sean's brother gets a job in Alberta, but Sean wants to stay at Degrassi. He finds out that he can live by himself with student welfare, but that plan is in jeopardy when his place becomes party central. Liberty makes it her mission to get J.T. his dream date to the semiformal, even if it's not her.
Note: Stefan Brogren, Lauren Collins, Jake Goldsbie, Aubrey Graham, Andrea Lewis, Pat Mastroianni, Miriam McDonald, Melissa McIntyre, Stacie Mistysyn, Adamo Ruggiero, Christina Schmidt, Amanda Stepto and Dan Woods are absent from this episode.
22 59 "The Power of Love" 5 April 2004 6 August 2004 322
It's the end of the year dance at Degrassi, and Jimmy wants it to be perfect for his date and their friends, but one misfortune after another plagues the evening. Feeling guilty for stealing Snake's laptop, Sean decides to come clean to him, but he soon realizes that getting Mr. Simpson's forgiveness is not going to be easy. Joey asks Caitlin to move in with him, but she is soon offered a job in Los Angeles.

Special guest star: Billy Ray Cyrus as the limo driver


Note: Melissa McIntyre, Christina Schmidt, Amanda Stepto and Dan Woods are absent from this episode.

DVD release[edit]

The DVD release of season three was released by Alliance Atlantis Home Entertainment in Canada, and by FUNimation Entertainment in the US on 28 March 2006 after it had completed broadcast on television. It was released in Australia by Shock Records on 13 April 2011. As well as every episode from the season, the DVD release features bonus material including Audio commentaries, deleted scenes, and bloopers.

The Complete Third Season
Degrassi: The Next Generation season 3 DVD digipak Set details[6] Special features[6]
  • Audio Commentaries:
    • "Accidents Will Happen"
    • "Pride"
  • Deleted Moments
  • Rock and Roll High School Karaoke
    • "I'm In Love"
    • "Spinner's Rap"
    • "Mr. Nice Guy"
    • "What I Know"
  • Season 3 Interactive Quiz
  • CTV Degrassi Promo
  • Degrassi Yearbook
  • Character and Cast Biographies
Release dates[6][35]
CanadaUnited States Region 1 Australia Region 4
28 March 2006 13 April 2011

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ellis 2005, p. 179
  2. ^ Stohn, Stephen (2003-05-26). "Shooting Season 3" (Note: Requires registration). Degrassi.tv. Epitome Virtual Reality. Retrieved 2008-02-05. 
  3. ^ Stohn, Stephen (2003-06-04). "Shooting Season 3" (Note: Requires registration). Degrassi.tv. Epitome Virtual Reality. Retrieved 2008-02-05. 
  4. ^ Stohn, Stephen (2004-01-04). "Shooting Season 3" (Note: Requires registration). Degrassi.tv. Epitome Virtual Reality. Retrieved 2008-02-05. 
  5. ^ Stohn, Stephen (2004-01-08). "Shooting Season 3" (Note: Requires registration). Degrassi.tv. Epitome Virtual Reality. Retrieved 2008-02-05. 
  6. ^ a b c d "Degrassi: The Next Generation - Season 3". TVShowsOnDVD.com. Retrieved 2008-02-09. 
  7. ^ Epitome Pictures. "Degrassi: The Next Generation" (Note: Requires iTunes software). The N. iTunes Store. Retrieved 2008-02-06. 
  8. ^ Ellis 2005, pp. 60–61, 83–85, 88
  9. ^ Ellis 2005, pp. 88–90
  10. ^ Melanson, Giselle (2005-11-09). "He's Still Jono". Pop Journalism. Retrieved 2008-02-08. 
  11. ^ Ellis 2005, p. 93
  12. ^ "BCE-CTV Benefits" (PDF). CRTC. 2004. p. 12. Retrieved 2008-02-18. 
  13. ^ "Rocket Fuelled Projects 2003". Shaw Rocket Fund. 2003. Archived from the original on 2007-07-10. Retrieved 2007-10-21. 
  14. ^ a b Linda Schuyler (co-creator, executive producer); Yan Moore (co-creator); Stephen Stohn (executive producer) (2005-03-28). Degrassi: The Next Generation - Season 3 DVD Boxset (DVD). Alliance Atlantis Home Entertainment. 
  15. ^ Ellis 2005, p. 96
  16. ^ Stohn, Stephen (2003-05-23). "Shooting Season 3" (Note: Requires registration). Degrassi.tv. Epitome Virtual Reality. Retrieved 2008-02-06. 
  17. ^ Ellis 2005, pp. 12–13
  18. ^ "Classes Begin at Degrassi September 7 on CTV". CTV Television Network. 2004-09-01. Retrieved 2008-02-08. 
  19. ^ "Degrassi Starts the Year with a New Timeslot and a New Generation of Fans". Degrassi.tv. Epitome Virtual Reality. 2004-01-24. Retrieved 2008-02-08. 
  20. ^ Armstrong, Jennifer (2004-10-01). "Fast Times at Degrassi High". Entertainment Weekly (686) (Time Inc.). Retrieved 2008-02-15. 
  21. ^ "Unreality TV". San Jose Mercury News. MediaNews Group. 2004-05-18. Archived from the original on 2004-06-23. Retrieved 2008-02-08. 
  22. ^ Goodman, Tim (2004-06-09). "'Tweener' TV too hot for parents?". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved 2008-02-09. 
  23. ^ Drumming, Neil (2004-06-11). "Cutting Class". Entertainment Weekly (Time Inc.). Retrieved 2007-09-20. 
  24. ^ a b Aurthur, Kate (2004-07-18). "Television's Most Persistent Taboo". The New York Times. Retrieved 2007-09-20. 
  25. ^ Kok, Dina (September 2004). "Abortion issue on popular TV show". The Interim. Retrieved 2007-09-20. 
  26. ^ "`Degrassi` abortion episode sparks fan outcry in U.S.". CBC. 2004-07-20. Retrieved 2007-09-20. 
    McKay, John (2004-07-19). "American teen channel delays abortion-themed Degrassi episode". National Post. Retrieved 2007-09-10. 
  27. ^ "Degrassi: The Next Generation - Awards". Epitome Virtual Reality. CTV. November 28, 2006. Retrieved 2007-12-04. 
    "Nominee's List" (PDF). Directors Guild of Canada. 2003-10-05. Retrieved 2007-12-08. 
  28. ^ "2004 Winners". Writers Guild of Canada. Retrieved 2007-12-07. 
  29. ^ "Canadian Awards Database History Search for "Degrassi"". Academy of Canadian Cinema and Television. 2007. Retrieved 2007-12-08. 
  30. ^ "Nominees for the 15th Annual GLAAD Media Awards". Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation. 2003-12-08. Archived from the original on 2007-11-24. Retrieved 2007-12-08. 
  31. ^ "25th Annual Young Artist Awards - Winners and Nominations". Young Artist Awards. Retrieved 2007-12-04. 
  32. ^ "Season 3". DegrassiTNGHO.com. Retrieved 2007-12-13. 
  33. ^ "15 Taboo-Breaking TV Moments". Entertainment Weekly. p. 2. Retrieved 2007-09-20. 
  34. ^ a b Aired as separate half-hour episodes in broadcast syndication
  35. ^ http://www.dvdorchard.com.au/ProductS1TV.asp?PND=177013&CS=1&NoCache=0%2E8494684

Notes[edit]

External links[edit]