Delaware Route 2

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Delaware Route 2 marker

Delaware Route 2
Route information
Maintained by DelDOT
Length: 10.94 mi[1] (17.61 km)
Existed: 1936 – present
Major junctions
West end: DE 72 / DE 273 near Newark
  DE 7 near Stanton
DE 41 in Prices Corner
DE 141 in Prices Corner
DE 100 in Elsmere
DE 48 in Wilmington
DE 9 in Wilmington
East end: DE 52 in Wilmington
Location
Counties: New Castle
Highway system

Routes in Delaware

DE 1D DE 3

Delaware Route 2 (DE 2) is a 10.94-mile-long (17.61 km) east–west highway located in northern New Castle County, Delaware. It runs from DE 72 and DE 273 east of Newark east to DE 52 in Wilmington. DE 2 is known variously as Capitol Trail, Kirkwood Highway, Wilmington Avenue, and Lincoln and Union Streets along its route. Between Newark and Wilmington, the route is a four- to six-lane divided highway that runs through suburban areas. In Wilmington, DE 2 is routed along a one-way pair of city streets.

What would become DE 2 was paved by 1924 and became a state highway by 1931, receiving the DE 2 designation by 1936. At this time, the western terminus of the road was at the Maryland border southwest of Newark, where it continued into that state as Maryland Route 279 (MD 279). The road was progressively widened into a divided highway from Wilmington to Newark between 1942 and 1964, bypassing some portions of the road which are now known as Old Capitol Trail. DE 2 was routed to bypass Newark by 1990, with DE 2 Business (DE 2 Bus.) designated on the former route through Newark. In 2013, the western terminus of DE 2 was truncated to its current location and DE 2 Bus. was decommissioned. The westernmost portion of the route was designated as DE 279.

Route description[edit]

DE 2 begins at an intersection with DE 72 and DE 273 in the eastern part of Newark. From here, DE 2 heads north concurrent with DE 72 on Capitol Trail, a four-lane divided highway. The road turns northeast and passes under CSX's Philadelphia Subdivision railroad line before it leaves Newark and continues northeast through wooded residential areas, briefly becoming undivided as it crosses White Clay Creek.[2][3]

DE 2 eastbound on Kirkwood Highway in Marshallton

DE 72 splits from DE 2 by heading northwest on Possum Park Road, with DE 2 continuing northeast through more suburban areas of homes and businesses as a four-lane divided highway, with the name changing to Kirkwood Highway. The road passes to the south of Pike Creek and intersects several roads including Polly Drummond Hill Road/Red Mill Road, North Harmony Road, Upper Pike Creek Road, Pike Creek Road, and Milltown Road. In Marshallton, the route widens to six lanes and comes to an intersection with DE 7. Past this intersection, DE 2 continues past businesses and shopping centers, intersecting Duncan Road. The road comes to a bridge over Red Clay Creek and the Wilmington and Western Railroad before heading into commercial areas in Prices Corner and coming to an intersection with Newport Gap Pike, which heads northwest as DE 41 and southeast as DE 62. At this point, DE 41 turns east to form a concurrency with DE 2, and the two routes continue east through commercial areas, passing to the north of Prices Corner Shopping Center. The road comes to a bridge over Centerville Road before reaching a partial cloverleaf interchange with the DE 141 freeway, where DE 41 comes to its southern terminus.[2][3]

Past this interchange, DE 2 narrows to four lanes and continues east through a mix of homes and businesses, passing to the south of a V.A. Hospital and crossing Little Mill Creek. At this point, the route enters Elsmere and becomes Wilmington Avenue, heading through more developed areas and briefly turning southeast before curving back to the east and reaching an intersection with DE 100. Past this intersection, the road comes to a bridge over a junction between CSX's Philadelphia Subdivision and an East Penn Railroad line before passing more urban homes. DE 2 crosses into Wilmington to the north of Canby Park and splits into the one-way pair of South Lincoln Street eastbound and South Union Street westbound, heading northeast. The one-way pair, which carries in two lanes in each direction, passes urban homes and businesses and reaches an intersection with DE 48 (Lancaster Avenue). At this point, DE 2 becomes North Lincoln Street eastbound and North Union Street westbound, with the westbound direction forming a concurrency with westbound DE 48 between West 2nd Street and Lancaster Avenue. DE 2 continues into the Little Italy neighborhood, where it intersects the northern terminus of DE 9. The route passes through the Hill Top neighborhood and continues to its eastern terminus at DE 52.[2][3]

DE 2 has an annual average daily traffic count ranging from a high of 49,378 vehicles at the DE 141 interchange to a low of 20,486 vehicles between DE 48 and DE 52.[1] None of DE 2 is part of the National Highway System.[4]

History[edit]

Old cutout shield for DE 2 westbound past DE 48 in Wilmington

What would become DE 2 was originally an unimproved county road by 1920.[5] By 1924, the road was paved.[6] The road became a state highway by 1931.[7] When Delaware designated its state highways by 1936, DE 2 was designated to run from the Maryland border southwest of Newark, where it connected to MD 279, to DE 52 in Wilmington, following Elkton Road, Main Street, Capitol Trail, New Road, and Union Street.[8] By 1939, DE 2 was widened into a divided highway between Prices Corner and Elsmere.[9] The divided highway portion of DE 2 was extended west from Prices Corner to DE 7 by 1942, bypassing the original alignment to the north.[10] By 1957, a portion of DE 2 west of the DE 7 intersection was moved to a new alignment slightly further north.[11] The divided highway was extended west to Red Mill Road by 1959. Also by this time, DE 2 was split into a one-way pair in Wilmington on Union Street and Lincoln Street.[12] The road between Newark and Red Mill Road became a divided highway by 1964.[13] The Christiana Parkway around the southern edge of Newark was completed by 1984.[14] By 1990, DE 2 was realigned to bypass Newark along Christiana Parkway, which carried portions of DE 4 and DE 896, Chestnut Hill Road, which also carried DE 4, and South Chapel Street and Library Avenue, which was also DE 72. With this realignment, the former route through Newark became DE 2 Bus.[15] In 2013, DelDOT proposed the renumbering of routes in and around Newark. The plan called for DE 2 to start at DE 273 (Main Street) east of Newark instead of at the Maryland state line as well as the removal of the DE 2 Bus. designation through Newark. In addition, the portion of Elkton Road between the Maryland border and the Christiana Parkway would be designated as DE 279. The goal of the project was to "simplify the route designations in Newark, reduce sign clutter, and reduce sign maintenance costs." The changes were completed in summer 2013.[16]

Major intersections[edit]

The entire route is in New Castle County.

Location Mile[1] km Destinations Notes
Newark 0.00 0.00 DE 72 south (Library Avenue) to I‑95
DE 273 (East Main Street/Ogletown Road)
Western terminus, west end of DE 72 concurrency
1.23 1.98 DE 72 north (Possum Park Road) East end of DE 72 concurrency
Marshallton 5.15 8.29 DE 7 (Limestone Road) – Stanton, Christiana, Dover
Prices Corner 6.90 11.10 DE 41 north / DE 62 east (Newport Gap Pike) – Avondale, Lancaster West end of DE 41 concurrency
7.48 12.04 DE 141 to I‑95 – Newport, Fairfax Interchange, East end of DE 41 concurrency
Elsmere 9.17 14.76 DE 100 (Dupont Road)
Wilmington 10.22 16.45 DE 48 (Lancaster Avenue) West end of westbound concurrency with DE 48 westbound
DE 48 (West 2nd Street) East end of westbound concurrency with DE 48 westbound
10.41 16.75 DE 9 south (West 4th Street)
10.94 17.61 DE 52 (Pennsylvania Avenue) Eastern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Bannered routes[edit]


Delaware Route 2 Business
Location: Newark
Length: 2.91 mi[1] (4.68 km)
Existed: 1990–2013
Former westbound DE 2 Bus./DE 273 along Main Street in Newark approaching College Avenue in 2013, a short time before DE 2 Bus. was decommissioned

Delaware Route 2 Business (DE 2 Bus.) was a 2.91-mile (4.68 km)[1] long business route of DE 2 that ran through Newark. DE 2 Bus. continued northeast from an intersection with DE 2/DE 4/DE 896 southwest of downtown Newark along four-lane divided Elkton Road, concurrent with DE 896. From this point, DE 2 Bus./DE 896 headed into residential areas. The road changed names to South Main Street and became undivided as it passed businesses before reaching downtown Newark. Here, DE 2 Bus./DE 896 intersected DE 273, with the road splitting into a one-way pair. Eastbound DE 2 Bus./northbound DE 896 headed concurrent with eastbound DE 273 on West Delaware Avenue, heading to the east, while westbound DE 2 Bus./southbound DE 896 remained along South Main Street, also concurrent with eastbound DE 273. The one-way pair carried two lanes in each direction. Westbound DE 2 Bus. entered South Main Street from West Main Street, which also carried the westbound direction of DE 273 and the northbound direction of DE 896. At the intersection with South College Avenue, the concurrency in both directions with northbound DE 896 ended. DE 2 Bus./DE 273 passed through the University of Delaware campus and continued through the commercial downtown as East Delaware Avenue eastbound and East Main Street westbound. Farther east, East Delaware Avenue shifted farther to the south of East Main Street, with the one-way streets passing between a residential neighborhood and coming to an intersection with DE 2/DE 72. At this point, DE 2 Bus. ended and eastbound DE 273 headed north with DE 2/DE 72 to rejoin westbound DE 273.[2][17] The route was created by 1990 when DE 2 was routed to bypass Newark.[15] In 2012, the Newark city council voted in favor of renaming the portion of Elkton Road carrying DE 2 Bus./DE 896 between West Park Place and West Main Street to South Main Street in order to promote businesses along this stretch of road. The change went into effect January 1, 2013.[18] DE 2 Bus. was decommissioned in 2013 as part of changes that also truncated the western terminus of DE 2 to the intersection with DE 72 and DE 273 in the eastern part of Newark.[16]

Major intersections
The entire route was in Newark, New Castle County.

Mile[1] km Destinations Notes
0.00 0.00 DE 2 / DE 4 east / DE 896 south (Elkton Road/Christina Parkway) to I‑95 south Western terminus, west end of DE 896 overlap
1.52 2.45 DE 273 west (West Main Street) / DE 896 north (New London Road) West end of DE 273 overlap
1.71 2.75 DE 896 (South College Avenue) East end of DE 896 overlap
2.91 4.68 DE 2 / DE 72 (Capitol Trail/Library Avenue)
DE 273 east (Ogletown Road)
Eastern terminus, east end of DE 273 overlap
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi


See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Staff (2011). "Traffic Count and Mileage Report: Interstate, Delaware, and US Routes" (PDF). Delaware Department of Transportation. Retrieved May 17, 2012. 
  2. ^ a b c d Delaware Department of Transportation (2008) (PDF). Delaware Official Transportation Map (Map) (2008 ed.). http://www.deldot.gov/archaeology/historic_pres/historic_highway_maps/pdf/cd_083.pdf. Retrieved March 22, 2012.
  3. ^ a b c Google Inc. "overview of Delaware Route 2". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. http://goo.gl/maps/mcWYc. Retrieved December 27, 2013.
  4. ^ Federal Highway Administration (2010) (PDF). National Highway System: Delaware (Map). http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/planning/nhs/maps/de/de_delaware.pdf. Retrieved February 10, 2012.
  5. ^ Delaware State Highway Department (1920) (PDF). Official Road Map (Map) (1920 ed.). http://www.deldot.gov/archaeology/historic_pres/historic_highway_maps/pdf/cd_002.pdf. Retrieved March 22, 2012.
  6. ^ Delaware State Highway Department (1924) (PDF). Official Road Map (Map) (1924 ed.). http://www.deldot.gov/archaeology/historic_pres/historic_highway_maps/pdf/cd_003.pdf. Retrieved March 22, 2012.
  7. ^ Delaware State Highway Department (1931) (PDF). Official Road Map of the State of Delaware (Map) (1931 ed.). http://www.deldot.gov/archaeology/historic_pres/historic_highway_maps/pdf/cd_005.pdf. Retrieved March 22, 2012.
  8. ^ Delaware State Highway Department (1936) (PDF). Official Road Map of the State of Delaware (Map). Cartography by The National Survey Co. (1936–37 ed.). http://www.deldot.gov/archaeology/historic_pres/historic_highway_maps/pdf/cd_008.pdf. Retrieved March 22, 2012.
  9. ^ Delaware State Highway Department (1939) (PDF). Official Road Map of the State of Delaware (Map) (1939 ed.). http://www.deldot.gov/archaeology/historic_pres/historic_highway_maps/pdf/cd_012.pdf. Retrieved March 22, 2012.
  10. ^ Delaware State Highway Department (1942) (PDF). Official Road Map of the State of Delaware (Map) (1942 ed.). http://www.deldot.gov/archaeology/historic_pres/historic_highway_maps/pdf/cd_014.pdf. Retrieved March 22, 2012.
  11. ^ Delaware State Highway Department (1957) (PDF). Official Highway Map of Delaware (Map) (1957–58 ed.). http://www.deldot.gov/archaeology/historic_pres/historic_highway_maps/pdf/cd_030.pdf. Retrieved March 22, 2012.
  12. ^ Delaware State Highway Department (1959) (PDF). Official Highway Map of Delaware (Map) (1959–60 ed.). http://www.deldot.gov/archaeology/historic_pres/historic_highway_maps/pdf/cd_032.pdf. Retrieved March 22, 2012.
  13. ^ Delaware State Highway Department (1964) (PDF). Official Highway Map of Delaware (Map) (1964 ed.). http://www.deldot.gov/archaeology/historic_pres/historic_highway_maps/pdf/cd_036.pdf. Retrieved March 22, 2012.
  14. ^ Delaware Department of Transportation (1984) (PDF). Official State Highway Map (Map) (1984 ed.). http://www.deldot.gov/archaeology/historic_pres/historic_highway_maps/pdf/cd_062.pdf. Retrieved March 22, 2012.
  15. ^ a b Delaware Department of Transportation (1990) (PDF). Official State Map (Map) (1990 ed.). http://www.deldot.gov/archaeology/historic_pres/historic_highway_maps/pdf/cd_070.pdf. Retrieved March 22, 2012.
  16. ^ a b Shannon, Josh (July 1, 2013). "A route to less clutter: DelDOT to consolidate Newark route numbers". Newark Post. Retrieved August 15, 2013. 
  17. ^ Google Inc. "overview of Delaware Route 2 Business". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. http://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=elkton+road+and+christiana+parkway&daddr=delaware+avenue+and+library+avenue&hl=en&ll=39.673899,-75.755968&spn=0.032041,0.084543&sll=39.679844,-75.732193&sspn=0.032038,0.084543&geocode=FTw_XQId0sB7-yl943uXZanHiTFl4BjqyGKlqA%3BFUp-XQIdd1t8-yllnk_OF6rHiTHwRqkZG831Eg&vpsrc=0&mra=ls&t=h&z=14. Retrieved January 8, 2012.
  18. ^ Andrew, Theresa (June 29, 2012). "Portion of Elkton Road will be renamed ‘South Main Street’ Jan. 1". Newark Post. Retrieved July 21, 2013. 

External links[edit]

Route map: Google / Bing