Delaware Route 41

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Delaware Route 41 marker

Delaware Route 41
Route information
Maintained by DelDOT
Length: 7.03 mi[1] (11.31 km)
Major junctions
South end: DE 141 in Prices Corner
  DE 2 in Prices Corner
DE 34 north of Prices Corner
DE 48 in Hockessin
North end: PA 41 near Hockessin
Location
Counties: New Castle
Highway system

Routes in Delaware

US 40 DE 42

Delaware Route 41 (DE 41) is a highway in northwestern New Castle County, Delaware. Its southern terminus is the on-ramp to DE 141 southbound. The highway is briefly concurrent with DE 2 in Prices Corner. From DE 2, the road passes through suburban areas along Newport Gap Pike, intersecting DE 34 in Brandywine Springs and DE 48 in Hockessin. Its northern terminus is the Pennsylvania state line just north of Hockessin, and it continues on as Pennsylvania Route 41 (PA 41) to Gap.

DE 41 was originally chartered as the Gap and Newport Turnpike in the 19th century. In the 1920s and 1930s, this road was upgraded to a state highway. DE 41 was designated by 1936 to run from U.S. Route 40 (US 40, now DE 9/DE 273) in New Castle north to the Pennsylvania border in Hockessin. In the 1950s, DE 141 became concurrent with the route from New Castle to north of Newport. DE 41 was removed from the DE 141 concurrency in the 1970s and was realigned to its current terminus in the 1980s, with part of the old alignment becoming DE 62.

Route description[edit]

Northbound DE 41 (Lancaster Pike) in Hockessin.

DE 41 begins at an interchange with DE 141 in Prices Corner, continuing west concurrent with DE 2 along the six-lane divided Kirkwood Highway. The route passes over Centerville Road before heading through commercial areas. DE 41 makes a turn northwest onto the Newport Gap Pike, which heads southeast from the Kirkwood Highway as DE 62. DE 41 is a two-lane divided highway before it crosses the Wilmington and Western Railroad and the Red Clay Creek in a wooded area. The route becomes an undivided road as it passes through residential neighborhoods with a few businesses. The road passes through woodland as it comes to an intersection with DE 34 (Faulkland Road). Past this junction, DE 41 passes through more suburban areas of homes, with stretches alternating between divided and undivided highway. It continues through developed areas and heads towards Hockessin.[2][3]

In Hockessin, DE 41 meets the western terminus of DE 48 (Lancaster Pike), onto which it merges. The Lancaster Pike is briefly a divided highway before narrowing into an undivided suburban road. The road continues to the northwest through more residential areas, again alternating between a divided and a two-lane undivided road. DE 41 turns to the west-northwest as it enters business areas and becomes a three-lane divided highway with one northbound lane and two southbound lanes. The median turns into a center left-turn lane as the road passes more development and crosses the Wilmington and Western Railroad again. The southbound direction narrows to one lane at the Yorklyn Road intersection. The road briefly becomes a divided highway at the Valley Road junction. After leaving the center of Hockessin, the route becomes a three-lane undivided road, with two northbound lanes and one southbound lane. The road passes homes, eventually narrowing back to two lanes. DE 41 reaches the Pennsylvania border, where the route becomes PA 41, continuing northwest on Gap Newport Pike.[2][3]

DE 41 has an annual average daily traffic count ranging from a high of 50,410 vehicles at the southern terminus at DE 141 to a low of 12,611 vehicles at the McKennans Church Road intersection.[1] None of DE 41 is part of the National Highway System.[4]

History[edit]

What is now DE 41 was originally chartered as the Gap and Newport Turnpike in 1808, an extension of the 1807-chartered turnpike in Pennsylvania that was to run from Gap, Pennsylvania southeast to Newport, Delaware.[5] By 1920, this road was maintained by the county.[6] The road north of Lancaster Pike was proposed as a state highway by 1924.[7] A year later, a state highway was completed on what would become DE 41 between New Castle and Prices Corner.[8] Plans were underway in 1927 to replace the outdated swing bridge over the Christina River in Newport.[9] Contracts for this project were awarded the following year.[10] The replacement bridge over the Christina River, a bascule bridge, opened on December 1, 1929.[11] In 1927, plans were made to replace the grade crossing at the Pennsylvania Railroad line in Newport with an underpass under the tracks.[9] Work on this underpass began in 1929.[11] The crossing under the Pennsylvania Railroad was finished and opened to traffic in June 1930.[12] In 1929, the Gap Road was upgraded to a state highway.[11]

When Delaware assigned state route numbers by 1936, DE 41 was designated to run from US 40 (now DE 9/DE 273) in New Castle north to PA 41 at the Pennsylvania border in Hockessin. It followed Basin Road north to Newport, James Street through Newport, and the Newport Gap Pike north of there.[13] By 1952, DE 141 was designated to run concurrent with DE 41 from New Castle to north of Newport.[14] In 1954, plans were made to replace the intersection with US 13/US 40 in Basin Corner with a modified cloverleaf interchange in an effort to reduce traffic congestion.[15] Construction on the interchange began in September of that year.[16] The interchange between US 13/US 40 and DE 41/DE 141 was completed in 1956.[17][18] In April 1954, work began to improve DE 41 between the DE 48 intersection and the Pennsylvania border. These improvements constructed a bypass of Hockessin and added truck lanes on steep grades. This project was scheduled for completion in July 1955.[15] The new northbound lanes of DE 41/DE 141 through the I-95 interchange opened in November 1962, at which point construction on the southbound lanes began.[19] The southbound lanes of DE 41/DE 141 opened in June 1964, enabling directional flow of DE 41/DE 141 through the interchange.[20] The southern terminus of DE 41 was truncated to DE 141 north of Newport by 1971, eliminating the concurrency with that route.[21] By 1981, DE 41 was realigned to follow DE 2 to end at an interchange with DE 141, with DE 62 being designated along the former DE 41 between DE 141 and DE 2.[22]

Major intersections[edit]

The entire route is in New Castle County.

Location Mile[1] km Destinations Notes
Prices Corner 0.00 0.00 DE 141 to I‑95 – Newport, Fairfax Interchange, southern terminus of DE 41
0.26 0.42 DE 2 east (Kirkwood Highway) – Elsmere South end of DE 2 concurrency
0.84 1.35 DE 2 west (Kirkwood Highway) – Newark
DE 62 east (Newport Gap Pike)
North end of DE 2 concurrency, western terminus of DE 62
Brandywine Springs 1.85 2.98 DE 34 (Faulkland Road)
Hockessin 4.28 6.89 DE 48 east (Lancaster Pike) Western terminus of DE 48
7.03 11.31 PA 41 north (Gap Newport Pike) – Avondale, Lancaster Pennsylvania border, northern terminus of DE 41
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Staff (2011). "Traffic Count and Mileage Report: Interstate, Delaware, and US Routes" (PDF). Delaware Department of Transportation. Retrieved May 17, 2012. 
  2. ^ a b Delaware Department of Transportation (2008) (PDF). Delaware Official Transportation Map (Map) (2008 ed.). http://www.deldot.gov/archaeology/historic_pres/historic_highway_maps/pdf/cd_083.pdf. Retrieved March 22, 2012.
  3. ^ a b Google Inc. "overview of Delaware Route 41". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. http://maps.google.com/maps?f=d&source=s_d&saddr=DE+2+and+north+woodward+avenue&daddr=DE+41+and+PA+41&geocode=FdBZXgIdDzB--yl7Ywvf_v3GiTGX_eUh9eQ7Wg%3BFQA3XwIdx7J8-ynN9A-Kff_GiTGWPpPfIu6FiQ&hl=en&mra=ls&sll=39.737678,-75.617652&sspn=0.003762,0.010568&ie=UTF8&t=h&z=13. Retrieved February 7, 2011.
  4. ^ Federal Highway Administration (2010) (PDF). National Highway System: Delaware (Map). http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/planning/nhs/maps/de/de_delaware.pdf. Retrieved February 10, 2012.
  5. ^ Scharf, John Thomas. History of Delaware : 1609-1888, Volume 1. Philadelphia: L.J. Richards & Co. p. 416. Retrieved February 7, 2011. 
  6. ^ Delaware State Highway Department (1920) (PDF). Official Road Map (Map) (1920 ed.). http://www.deldot.gov/archaeology/historic_pres/historic_highway_maps/pdf/cd_002.pdf. Retrieved March 22, 2012.
  7. ^ Delaware State Highway Department (1924) (PDF). Official Road Map (Map) (1924 ed.). http://www.deldot.gov/archaeology/historic_pres/historic_highway_maps/pdf/cd_003.pdf. Retrieved March 22, 2012.
  8. ^ Delaware State Highway Department (1925) (PDF). Official Road Map (Map) (1925 ed.). http://www.deldot.gov/archaeology/historic_pres/historic_highway_maps/pdf/cd_004.pdf. Retrieved March 22, 2012.
  9. ^ a b "Annual Report of the State Highway Department" (1927 ed.). Dover, Delaware: Delaware State Highway Department. December 31, 1927. p. 8, 23. Retrieved November 12, 2014. 
  10. ^ "Annual Report of the State Highway Department" (1928 ed.). Dover, Delaware: Delaware State Highway Department. December 31, 1928. p. 8. Retrieved November 16, 2014. 
  11. ^ a b c "Annual Report of the State Highway Department" (1929 ed.). Dover, Delaware: Delaware State Highway Department. December 31, 1929. p. 13, 19. Retrieved November 12, 2014. 
  12. ^ "Annual Report of the State Highway Department" (1930 ed.). Dover, Delaware: Delaware State Highway Department. December 31, 1930. p. 13. Retrieved November 12, 2014. 
  13. ^ Delaware State Highway Department (1936) (PDF). Official Road Map of the State of Delaware (Map). Cartography by The National Survey Co. (1936–37 ed.). http://www.deldot.gov/archaeology/historic_pres/historic_highway_maps/pdf/cd_008.pdf. Retrieved March 22, 2012.
  14. ^ Delaware State Highway Department (1952) (PDF). Official Highway Map of Delaware (Map) (1952–53 ed.). http://www.deldot.gov/archaeology/historic_pres/historic_highway_maps/pdf/cd_026.pdf. Retrieved March 22, 2012.
  15. ^ a b "Report of the State Highway Department" (PDF) (1954 ed.). Dover, Delaware: Delaware State Highway Department. July 1, 1954. p. 14, 17, 41. Retrieved November 9, 2014. 
  16. ^ "Report of the State Highway Department" (PDF) (1955 ed.). Dover, Delaware: Delaware State Highway Department. July 1, 1955. p. 57. Retrieved November 9, 2014. 
  17. ^ "Report of the State Highway Department" (PDF) (1956 ed.). Dover, Delaware: Delaware State Highway Department. July 1, 1956. p. 54. Retrieved February 6, 2014. 
  18. ^ Delaware State Highway Department (1957) (PDF). Official Highway Map of Delaware (Map) (1957–58 ed.). http://www.deldot.gov/archaeology/historic_pres/historic_highway_maps/pdf/cd_030.pdf. Retrieved March 22, 2012.
  19. ^ "Annual Report Delaware State Highway Department" (PDF) (1963 ed.). Dover, Delaware: Delaware State Highway Department. December 31, 1964. p. 23. Retrieved November 10, 2014. 
  20. ^ "Annual Report" (PDF) (1964 ed.). Dover, Delaware: Delaware State Highway Department. 1964. p. 20. Retrieved November 10, 2014. 
  21. ^ Delaware Department of Highways and Transportation (1971) (PDF). Delaware Highways Official Map (Map) (1971 ed.). http://www.deldot.gov/archaeology/historic_pres/historic_highway_maps/pdf/cd_050.pdf. Retrieved March 22, 2012.
  22. ^ Delaware Department of Transportation (1981) (PDF). Delaware Official State Highway Map (Map) (1981 ed.). http://www.deldot.gov/archaeology/historic_pres/historic_highway_maps/pdf/cd_058.pdf. Retrieved March 22, 2012.

External links[edit]

Route map: Google / Bing