Delhi Territory

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Delhi Territory
Region of
the British Empire in India
Flag of the Mughal Empire (triangular).svg
1803–1832 Flag of the British East India Company (1801).svg
Location of DT
Delhi territory as part of North-Western Provinces
Capital Delhi
History
 -  Established 1803
 -  Disestablished 1832
Today part of Portions in Haryana
Delhi

The Delhi Territory was an administrative region in British India which comprised the present districts of Gurgaon, Delhi, Rohtak, Hissar, tahsil panipat and pargana Karnal in the Karnal District.

History[edit]

Until 1832, the Delhi territory was controlled by the Residency. Regulation V of that year, abolished the office of Resident and annexed the Delhi territory to the jurisdiction of the Sadr Board and Courts of Justice at Allahabad, which included the Commissioner of the Delhi territory and all officers acting under his control, ordinarily to “or form to the principles and spirit of the regulations” in their his control, ordinarily to administration.

After the Indian rebellion of 1857, the Delhi division of the North-Western Provinces was transferred to the Punjab in 1858, and formed into the Delhi and Hissar divisions, which embraced the six districts of Delhi, Gurgaon, Panipat, Rohtak, Hissar and Sirsa.[1]

See also[edit]

A map of British Punjab 1909

Notes[edit]

References[edit]

  • Bayly, C. A. (2002), Rulers, Townsmen, and Bazaars: North Indian Society in the Age of British Expansion 1770–1870, Delhi: Oxford University Press. Pp. 530, ISBN 0-19-566345-4 
  • Imperial Gazetteer of India vol. V (1908), Abāzai to Arcot ("Agra Province" pp. 71–72), Published under the authority of His Majesty's Secretary of State for India in Council, Oxford at the Clarendon Press. Pp. viii, 1 map, 437. 
  • Imperial Gazetteer of India vol. XXIV (1908), Travancore to Zīra ("United Provinces" pp. 132–276), Published under the authority of His Majesty's Secretary of State for India in Council, Oxford at the Clarendon Press. Pp. vi, 1 map, 437. 
  • Raikes, Charles (1852), Notes on the North-Western Provinces of India, London: Chapman Hall. Pp. vii, 270