Delverne Dressel

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Del Dressel
— Lacrosse player —
Position Midfield
NCAA team Johns Hopkins University
Coaching career Brentwood School
Nationality United States
Shoots Left
Nickname Del
Career highlights
U.S. Lacrosse Hall of Fame, 2002

Delverne "Del" Dressel is an American lacrosse player and a National Hall of Fame member, inducted in 2002.[1]

Career[edit]

Dressel played midfielder for the Johns Hopkins University helping the team to NCAA Men's Lacrosse Championship titles in 1984 and 1985. Dressel was an exceptional midfielder who excelled at both offense and defense, playing before the game changed to specialized offensive and defensive specialists. He was awarded the Lt. Donald McLaughlin Jr. Award as the nation's top midfielder in both 1984 and 1985.[2] He is one of only six college players to be named a first-team All-American four times, the others being Douglas Turnbull (Johns Hopkins, 1922–25), Everett Smith (St. John's, 1933-37), Frank Urso (Maryland, 1973–76), Jason Coffman (Salisbury St., 1993-96), and Mikey Powell (Syracuse, 2001–04).[3]

Del ended his career at Hopkins as one of their all-time top scorers with 99 goals and 75 assists for 174 points, good for thirteenth all-time.

Dressel attended Gilman School, was a two time High School All American[4] and honored with the C. Markland Kelly award to designate the best high school lacrosse player in Maryland. After a brief enrollment at Harvard, Dressel transferred to Johns Hopkins. He would later go on to Tulane University medical school in 1990.

Dressel briefly head coached at the prep school level at Brentwood School.

Statistics[edit]

Johns Hopkins University[edit]

     
Season GP G A Pts PPG
1983 13 27 19 46 --
1984 13 27 17 44 --
1985 14 23 19 42 --
1986 14 22 20 42 --
Totals 40 99 75 174 5.60

Awards[edit]

  • Dressel is one of only six college lacrosse first team All-Americans

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

Preceded by
Peter Voelkel
McLaughlin Award
1984, 1985
Succeeded by
Glen Miles