Democracy Alliance

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The Democracy Alliance is a partnership of business and philanthropic leaders who commit to making volunteer and financial donations to organizations the Alliance has endorsed. Since its founding in 2005, the Alliance has helped direct nearly $150 million to progressive organizations.

History[edit]

A PowerPoint presentation, "The Conservative Message Machine Money Matrix", created by Rob Stein and shown to individuals and small groups of donors in 2003 and 2004, is often credited as being the impetus for the group's formation.[1][2]

The first meeting of the Democracy Alliance was held at The Boulders near Scottsdale, Arizona in April 2005. Rob Stein, who created the PowerPoint presentation, "The Conservative Message Machine Money Matrix", was installed as temporary CEO, pending the group's selection of a permanent leader.

At the Democracy Alliance's second meeting, held at the Chateau Elan near Atlanta, Georgia in October 2005, management consultant Judy Wade was installed as the CEO of the organization. At the group's fourth meeting in Miami in November 2006, Wade was replaced with Kelly Craighead.[3][4]

In July 2006, Rob McKay was elected chairman of the board and Anna Burger of the Service Employees International Union (SEIU) was elected vice chair.[5]

Organizations funded[edit]

The Alliance recommends a portfolio of organizations that work together through collaboration and alliances.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "How Vast The Left Wing Conspiracy", transcript of Hudson Institute panel discussion partly on the Democracy Alliance (with participation from its founder Rob Stein), November 30, 2006
  2. ^ VandeHei, Jim (2006-07-17). "A New Alliance of Democrats Spreads Funding; But Some in Party Bristle At Secrecy and Liberal Tilt". The Washington Post. p. A01. Retrieved 2010-04-17. 
  3. ^ Bai (2006), p. 293
  4. ^ "More Turnover at a Big Donor Shop", U.S. News & World Report, April 16, 2007
  5. ^ "Big $$ for Progressive Politics", The Nation, October 16, 2006

External links[edit]