Demographics of Argentina

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Demographics of Argentina
Argentina-demography.png
Population of Argentina, 1961–2010
Population 42,192,500[1]
Growth rate 1.036% (2010 est.)[2]
Birth rate 17.75 births/1,000 population (2010 est.)
Death rate 7.39 deaths/1,000 population (July 2010 est.)
Life expectancy 77.14 years
 • male 73.9 years
 • female 80.54 years (2012 est.)
Fertility rate 2.29 children born/woman (2012 est.)
Infant mortality rate 10.52 deaths/1,000 live births
Net migration rate 0 migrant(s)/1,000 population (2012 est.)
Age structure
0–14 years 25.2% (male 5,450,679/ female 5,200,704)
15–64 years 63.6% (male 13,400,997/ female 13,440,948)
65 and over 11.1% (male 1,940,810/ female 2,758,356) (2012 est.)
Sex ratio
Total 0.97 male(s)/female (2011 est.)
At birth 1.05 male(s)/female
Under 15 1.05 male(s)/female
15–64 years 1 male(s)/female
65 and over 0.7 male(s)/female
Nationality
Nationality Argentine
Language
Official Spanish language
Spoken English, Italian, German, Welsh, Yiddish, Portuguese, Guarani, Quechua, Mapudungun and many others are also spoken varying by region

This article is about the demographic features of Argentina, including population density, ethnicity, economic status and other aspects of the population.

In the 2001 census [INDEC], Argentina had a population of 36,260,130 inhabitants, and preliminary results from the 2010 census [INDEC] census were of 40,091,359 inhabitants.[3][4] Argentina ranks third in South America in total population and 33rd globally. Population density is of 15 persons per square kilometer of land area, well below the world average of 50 persons. The population growth rate in 2008 was estimated to be 0.92% annually, with a birth rate of 16.32 live births per 1,000 inhabitants and a mortality rate of 7.54 deaths per 1,000 inhabitants.

The proportion of people under 15, at 24.6%, is somewhat below the world average (28%), and the cohort of people 65 and older is relatively high, at 10.8%. The percentage of senior citizens in Argentina has long been second only to Uruguay in Latin America and well above the world average, which is currently 7%.

Argentina's population has long had one of Latin America's lowest birth rates and population growth rates (recently, about 1% a year), but it enjoys a comparatively low infant mortality rate. The median age is approximately 30 years and life expectancy at birth is of 76 years. According to an official cultural consumption survey conducted in 2006, 42.3% of Argentines speak English (though only 15.4% of those claimed to have a high level of English comprehension) and 9.3% speak Portuguese.[5]

Population[edit]

According to the 2010 revison of the World Population Prospects the total population was 40,412,000 in 2010, compared to only 17,150,000 in 1950. The proportion of children below the age of 15 in 2010 was 24.9%, 64.5% was between 15 and 65 years of age, while 10.6% was 65 years or older .[6]

Argentine population structure in 2009, illustrated in a population pyramid
Total population
(x 1000)
Proportion
aged 0–14
(%)
Proportion
aged 15–64
(%)
Proportion
aged 65+
(%)
1950 17 150 30.5 65.3 4.2
1955 18 931 30.7 64.4 4.8
1960 20 625 30.7 63.7 5.5
1965 22 297 30.2 63.7 6.2
1970 23 983 29.3 63.8 6.9
1975 26 079 29.2 63.3 7.5
1980 28 131 30.5 61.5 8.0
1985 30 354 30.9 60.6 8.5
1990 32 642 30.7 60.4 8.9
1995 34 855 29.1 61.4 9.5
2000 36 931 27.9 62.2 9.9
2005 38 681 26.3 63.5 10.2
2010 40 412 24.9 64.5 10.6

Cities[edit]

Argentina is highly urbanized,[2] with the ten largest metropolitan areas accounting for half of the population, and fewer than one in ten living in rural areas. About 3 million people live in Buenos Aires proper, and the Greater Buenos Aires metropolitan area totals around 13 million, making it one of the largest urban areas in the world.[7] The metropolitan areas of Córdoba and Rosario have around 1.3 million inhabitants each,[7] and six other cities (Mendoza, Tucumán, La Plata, Mar del Plata, Salta and Santa Fe)[7][8] have at least half a million people each.

The population is unequally distributed amongst the provinces, with about 60% living in the Pampa region (21% of the total area), including 15 million people in Buenos Aires Province, and 3 million each in Córdoba Province, Santa Fe Province and the Autonomous City of Buenos Aires. Seven other provinces each have about one million people: Mendoza, Tucumán, Entre Ríos, Salta, Chaco, Corrientes and Misiones. Tucumán is the most densely populated (with 60 inhabitants/km², the only Argentine province more densely populated than the world average), while the southern province of Santa Cruz has less than 1 inhabitant/km².

In the mid 19th century a large wave of immigration started to arrive to Argentina due to new Constitutional policies that encouraged immigration, and issues in the countries the immigrants came from such as wars, poverty, hunger, famines, pursuit of a better life, among other reasons. The main immigration sources were from Europe, the countries from the Near and Middle East, Russia and Japan. In fact, the immigration torrent was so strong that Argentina eventually became the second country in the world that received the most immigrants, with 6.6 millions, second only to the USA with 27 millions, and ahead of such immigration receptor countries such as Canada, Brazil, Australia, etc.[9][10]

Most of these European immigrants settled in the cities which offered jobs, education and other opportunities enabling them to enter the middle class. Many also settled in the growing small towns along the expanding railway system and since the 1930s many rural workers have moved to the big cities.[11] Urban areas reflect the influence of European immigration, and most of the larger ones feature boulevards and diagonal avenues inspired by the redevelopment of Paris. Argentine cities were originally built in a colonial Spanish grid style, centered around a plaza overlooked by a cathedral and important government buildings. Many still retain this general layout, known as a damero, meaning checkerboard, since it is based on a pattern of square blocks. The city of La Plata, designed at the end of the 19th century by Pedro Benoit, combines the checkerboard layout with added diagonal avenues at fixed intervals, and was the first in South America with electric street illumination.[12]

Largest cities[edit]

Provinces and districts[edit]

Flag Province/District Capital Official Language Population (2010)[13] Rank Area (km²) Rank Density (/km²)[13] Rank
Buenos Aires Buenos Aires City -- 2,891,082 4 203 24 14,241.8 1
Buenos Aires Province Buenos Aires Province La Plata 15,594,428 1 307,571 1 50.7 3
Catamarca Province Catamarca Province San Fernando del Valle de Catamarca 367,820 20 102,602 11 3.6 20
Chaco Province Chaco Province Resistencia 1,053,466 10 99,633 12 10.6 11
Chubut Province Chubut Province Rawson 506,668 18 224,686 3 2.3 22
Córdoba Province, Argentina Córdoba Province Córdoba 3,304,825 2 165,321 5 20.0 6
Corrientes Province Corrientes Province Corrientes Spanish, Guaraní 993,338 11 88,199 16 11.3 10
Entre Ríos Province Entre Ríos Province Paraná 1,236,300 7 78,781 17 15.7 7
Formosa Province Formosa Province Formosa 527,895 17 72,066 19 7.3 14
Jujuy Province Jujuy Province San Salvador de Jujuy 672,260 14 53,219 20 12.6 8
La Pampa Province La Pampa Province Santa Rosa 316,940 22 143,440 8 2.2 23
La Rioja Province, Argentina La Rioja Province La Rioja 331,847 21 89,680 14 3.7 19
Mendoza Province Mendoza Province Mendoza 1,741,610 5 148,827 7 11.7 9
Misiones Province Misiones Province Posadas 1,097,829 9 29,801 21 36.8 4
Neuquén Province Neuquén Province Neuquén 550,334 16 94,078 13 5.8 17
Río Negro Province Río Negro Province Viedma 633,374 15 203,013 4 3.1 21
Salta Province Salta Province Salta 1,215,207 8 155,488 6 7.8 12
San Juan Province, Argentina San Juan Province San Juan 680,427 13 89,651 15 7.6 13
San Luis Province San Luis Province San Luis 431,588 19 76,748 18 5.6 18
Santa Cruz Province, Argentina Santa Cruz Province Río Gallegos 272,524 23 243,943 2 1.1 24
Santa Fe Province Santa Fe Province Santa Fe de la Vera Cruz 3,200,736 3 133,007 10 24.1 5
Santiago del Estero Province Santiago del Estero Province   Santiago del Estero 896,461 12 136,351 9 6.6 15
Tierra del Fuego Province, Argentina Tierra del Fuego Province Ushuaia 126,190 24 21,263a 23 5.8a 16
Tucumán Province Tucumán Province San Miguel de Tucumán   1,448,200 6 22,524 22 64.3 2

a Not including claims to the Falkland Islands and the Argentine Antarctica.

Vital statistics[edit]

The table below gives an overview of the number of birth and deaths in Argentina during the past century. Several sources were combined to construct the table.[14][15][16] The number of births in 2010 (756,176) was the highest number ever recorded. The number of deaths in 2010 also was the highest ever record. However, as the population of Argentina showed a sixfold increase during the past century, the birth and death rates in 2010 (18.7 and 7.9, respectively) were rather low in a histolorical perspective.

Average population
(x 1000)
Live births Deaths Natural change Crude birth rate
(per 1000)
Crude death rate
(per 1000)
Natural change
(per 1000)
Fertility rates
1910 6 800 260 000 129 000 131 000 38.3 18.9 19.4
1911 7 070 268 000 129 000 139 000 37.9 18.2 19.7
1912 7 470 288 000 127 000 161 000 38.6 17.0 21.6
1913 7 840 298 000 127 000 171 000 38.0 16.2 21.8
1914 8 000 294 000 123 000 171 000 36.7 15.4 21.3
1915 8 150 288 000 129 000 159 000 35.3 15.8 19.5
1916 8 300 293 000 142 000 151 000 35.3 17.1 18.2
1917 8 450 284 000 136 000 148 000 33.6 16.1 17.5
1918 8 600 283 000 157 000 126 000 32.9 18.2 14.7
1919 8 750 286 000 161 000 125 000 32.7 18.4 14.3
1920 8 970 290 000 139 000 151 000 32.3 15.5 16.8
1921 9 220 302 000 146 000 156 000 32.8 15.8 17.0
1922 9 520 315 000 133 000 182 000 33.1 14.0 19.1
1923 9 890 336 000 146 000 190 000 34.0 14.8 19.2
1924 10 220 335 000 146 000 189 000 32.8 14.3 18.5
1925 10 500 334 000 148 000 186 000 31.8 14.1 17.7
1926 10 800 337 000 147 000 190 000 31.2 13.6 17.6
1927 11 130 342 000 157 000 185 000 30.7 14.1 16.6
1928 11 440 352 000 151 000 201 000 30.8 13.2 17.6
1929 11 750 355 000 162 000 193 000 30.2 13.8 16.4
1930 12 050 355 000 153 000 202 000 29.5 12.7 16.8
1931 12 290 350 000 156 000 194 000 28.5 12.7 15.8
1932 12 520 352 000 139 000 213 000 28.1 11.1 17.0
1933 12 730 332 000 150 000 182 000 26.1 11.8 14.3
1934 12 940 319 661 143 065 176 596 24.7 11.1 13.6
1935 13 150 322 002 162 768 159 234 24.5 12.4 12.1
1936 13 370 318 651 150 092 168 559 23.8 11.2 12.6
1937 13 610 319 024 154 275 164 749 23.4 11.3 12.1
1938 14 202 325 412 161 555 163 857 22.9 11.4 11.5
1939 14 397 329 393 149 153 180 240 22.9 10.4 12.5
1940 14 591 339 029 151 856 187 173 23.2 10.4 12.8
1941 14 796 340 339 148 947 191 392 23.0 10.1 12.9
1942 15 004 338 199 150 030 188 169 22.5 10.0 12.5
1943 15 216 358 977 150 166 208 811 23.6 9.9 13.7
1944 15 441 380 950 154 093 226 857 24.7 10.0 14.7
1945 15 674 388 191 157 785 230 406 24.8 10.1 14.7
1946 15 912 387 496 149 895 237 601 24.4 9.4 14.9
1947 16 109 398 468 158 059 240 409 24.7 9.7 15.0
1948 16 284 413 132 152 648 260 484 25.4 9.4 16.0
1949 16 671 419 656 150 604 269 052 25.2 9.0 16.1
1950 17 150 438 766 154 540 284 226 25.6 9.0 16.6
1951 17 506 444 326 156 406 287 920 25.4 9.0 16.5
1952 17 865 446 156 153 887 292 269 25.0 8.6 16.4
1953 18 224 459 734 162 217 297 517 25.3 8.9 16.4
1954 18 580 457 559 156 347 301 212 24.6 8.4 16.2
1955 18 931 461 293 167 357 293 936 24.4 8.8 15.5
1956 19 277 474 142 161 321 312 821 24.6 8.4 16.2
1957 19 618 478 368 179 578 298 790 24.4 9.2 15.2
1958 19 955 472 865 166 235 306 630 23.7 8.3 15.4
1959 20 291 476 211 173 409 302 802 23.5 8.5 14.9
1960 20 625 473 038 179 266 293 772 22.9 8.7 14.2
1961 20 961 476 259 176 477 299 782 22.7 8.4 14.3
1962 21 297 490 414 184 013 306 401 23.0 8.6 14.4
1963 21 633 491 109 187 492 303 617 22.7 8.7 14.0
1964 21 966 496 256 193 141 303 115 22.6 8.8 13.8
1965 22 297 481 814 196 467 285 347 21.6 8.8 12.8
1966 22 622 479 396 194 450 284 946 21.2 8.6 12.6
1967 22 945 480 317 195 265 285 052 20.9 8.5 12.4
1968 23 273 493 354 213 313 280 041 21.2 9.2 12.0
1969 23 617 580 699 222 937 357 762 24.6 9.4 15.2
1970 23 983 544 521 222 113 322 408 22.7 9.3 13.5
1971 24 376 564 787 225 000 339 787 23.2 9.2 14.0
1972 24 792 559 398 228 000 331 398 22.6 9.2 13.4
1973 25 222 561 500 231 000 330 500 22.3 9.2 13.1
1974 25 654 590 000 234 000 356 000 23.0 9.1 13.9
1975 26 079 620 000 237 000 383 000 23.8 9.1 14.7
1976 26 493 656 768 240 764 416 004 24.8 9.1 15.7
1977 26 899 661 222 234 430 426 792 24.6 8.7 15.9
1978 27 303 665 000 233 482 431 518 24.4 8.6 15.8
1979 27 712 647 864 234 926 412 938 23.4 8.5 14.9
1980 28 131 697 775 241 125 456 650 24.8 8.6 16.3
1981 28 562 680 292 241 904 438 388 23.8 8.5 15.4
1982 29 001 663 429 234 926 428 503 22.9 8.1 14.8
1983 29 448 655 876 233 071 422 805 22.3 7.9 14.4
1984 29 900 635 323 255 591 379 732 21.3 8.6 12.7
1985 30 354 650 783 241 377 409 406 21.5 8.0 13.5
1986 30 811 675 388 241 004 434 384 22.0 7.8 14.1
1987 31 270 668 136 249 882 418 254 21.4 8.0 13.4
1988 31 729 680 605 254 953 425 652 21.5 8.1 13.5
1989 32 187 667 058 252 302 414 756 20.8 7.9 12.9
1990 32 642 678 644 259 683 418 961 20.9 8.0 12.9
1991 33 094 694 776 255 609 439 167 21.0 7.7 13.3
1992 33 540 678 761 262 287 416 474 20.2 7.8 12.4
1993 33 982 667 518 267 286 400 232 19.6 7.9 11.8
1994 34 420 673 787 257 431 416 356 19.6 7.5 12.1
1995 34 855 658 735 268 997 389 738 18.9 7.7 11.2
1996 35 287 675 437 268 715 406 722 19.1 7.6 11.5
1997 35 715 692 357 270 910 421 447 19.4 7.6 11.8
1998 36 135 683 301 280 180 403 121 18.9 7.8 11.2
1999 36 541 686 748 289 543 397 205 18.8 7.9 10.9
2000 36 931 701 878 277 148 424 730 19.0 7.5 11.5
2001 37 302 683 495 285 941 397 554 18.3 7.7 10.7
2002 37 657 694 684 291 190 403 494 18.4 7.7 10.7
2003 38 001 697 952 302 064 395 888 18.4 7.9 10.4
2004 38 341 736 261 294 051 442 210 19.2 7.7 11.5
2005 38 681 721 220 293 529 427 691 18.6 7.6 11.1
2006 39 024 696 451 292 313 404 138 17.8 7.5 10.4
2007 39 368 700 792 315 852 384 940 17.8 8.0 9.8
2008 39 714 746 460 301 801 444 659 18.8 7.6 11.2
2009 40 062 745 336 304 525 440 811 18.6 7.6 11.0
2010 40 412 756 176 318 602 437 574 18.7 7.9 10.8
2011 40 900 758 042 319 059 438 983 18.5 7.8 10.7
2012[17] 41 282 738 318 319 539 418 779 17.9 7.7 10.2 2.30

UN estimates[edit]

The Population Departement of the United Nations prepared the following estimates of vital statistics of Argentina. [6]

Period Live births
per year
Deaths
per year
Natural change
per year
CBR* CDR* NC* TFR* IMR* Life expectancy
total
Life expectancy
males
Life expectancy
females
1950-1955 459 000 166 000 293 000 25.4 9.1 16.3 3.15 66 62.5 60.4 65.1
1955-1960 484 000 174 000 310 000 24.3 8.6 15.7 3.13 60 64.5 62.1 67.4
1960-1965 501 000 193 000 308 000 23.2 8.8 14.4 3.09 60 65.2 62.4 68.6
1965-1970 522 000 213 000 309 000 22.6 9.1 13.5 3.05 57 65.7 62.7 69.3
1970-1975 582 000 228 000 354 000 23.4 8.9 14.4 3.15 48 67.2 64.1 70.7
1975-1980 688 000 243 000 445 000 25.6 8.9 16.8 3.44 39 68.6 65.4 72.2
1980-1985 668 000 249 000 419 000 23.1 8.5 14.7 3.15 32 70.1 66.8 73.7
1985-1990 688 000 266 000 422 000 22.1 8.4 13.8 3.05 27 71.0 67.5 74.6
1990-1995 708 000 277 000 431 000 21.2 8.1 13.1 2.90 24 72.1 68.6 75.8
1995-2000 701 000 285 000 416 000 19.7 7.8 11.8 2.63 22 73.2 69.6 76.9
2000-2005 676 000 298 000 378 000 18.0 7.8 10.2 2.35 15 74.3 70.6 78.1
2005-2010 690 000 309 000 381 000 17.5 7.7 9.8 2.25 13 75.3 71.5 78.1
* CBR = crude birth rate (per 1000); CDR = crude death rate (per 1000); NC = natural change (per 1000); IMR = infant mortality rate per 1000 births; TFR = total fertility rate (number of children per woman)

Ethnic groups[edit]

Indigenous peoples[edit]

Distribution of the Indigenous Peoples in Argentina.

According to the data of INDEC's Complementary Survey of Indigenous Peoples (ECPI) 2004 - 2005, 600,000 indigenous persons (about 1.4% of the total population) reside in Argentina. The most numerous of these communities are the Mapuches, who live mostly in the south, the Kollas and Wichís, from the northwest, and the Tobas, who live mostly in the northeast.[18]

The officially recognized indigenous population in the country, according to the 2004–05 "Complementary Survey of Indigenous Peoples", stands at approximately 600,000 (around 1.4% of the total population), the most numerous of whom are the Mapuche people.[19]

Indigenous population of Argentina
Ethnic
group
Survey 2004-2005
Number  %
Atacama 3,044 0.5
Avá-Guaraní 21,807 3.6
Aymara 4,104 0.7
Chané 4,376 0.7
Charrúa 4,511 0.7
Chorote 2,613 0.4
Chulupí 553 0.1
Comechingón 10,863 1.8
Diaguita/diaguita calchaquí 31,753 5.3
Guaraní 22,059 3.7
Huarpe 14,633 2.4
Kolla 70,505 11.7
Lule 854 0.1
Mapuche 113,680 18.8
Mbyá guaraní 8,223 1.4
Mocoví 15,837 2.6
Omaguaca 1,553 0.3
Ona 696 0.1
Pampa 1,585 0.3
Pilagá 4,465 0.7
Quechua 6,739 1.1
Querandí 736 0.1
Rankulche 10,149 1.7
Sanavirón 563 0.1
Tapiete 524 0.1
Tehuelche 10,590 1.8
Toba 69,452 11.5
Tonocoté 4,779 0.8
Tupí guaraní 16,365 2.7
Wichí 40,036 6.6
Others 3,864 0.6
Not specified 102,247 16.0

Immigration to Argentina[edit]

European settlement[edit]

As with other areas of new settlement such as Canada, Australia, the United States, Brazil, New Zealand and Uruguay, Argentina is considered a country of immigrants.[20] When it is considered that Argentina was second only to the United States (27 million of immigrants) in the number of immigrants received, even ahead of such other areas of new settlement like Canada, Brazil and Australia;[9][10] and that the country was scarcely populated following its independence, the impact of the immigration to Argentina becomes evident.

Most Argentines are descended from colonial-era settlers and of the 19th and 20th century immigrants from Europe. An estimated 8% of the population is Mestizo, and a further 4% of Argentines are of Arab (in Argentina the Arab ethnicity is considered among the White people, just like in the USA Census) or Asian heritage.[21] In the last national census, based on self-identification, 600,000 Argentines (1.6% of the population) declared to be Amerindians[19] Most of the 6.2 million European immigrants arriving between 1850 and 1950, regardless of origin, settled in several regions of the country. Due to this large-scale European immigration, Argentina's population more than doubled.

Immigrant population in Argentina (1869–1991)

The majority of these European immigrants came from Italy, Spain, Germany, France, Switzerland, Wales, Ireland, Scotland, Poland, Yugoslavia, Czechoslovakia, the Austro-Hungarian Empire, the Ottoman Empire, Russia, Ukraine, Denmark, Sweden, Finland, Norway, Belgium, Luxemburg, the Netherlands, Portugal, Romania, Bulgaria, Armenia, Greece, Lithuana, Estonia, Latvia and several other regions.

Italian population in Argentina arrived mainly from the northern Italian regions varying between Piedmont, Veneto and Lombardy, later from Campania and Calabria;[22] Many Argentines have the gentilic of an Italian city, place, street or occupation of the immigrant as last name, many of them were not necessarily born Italians, but once they did the roles of immigration in Italy the name usually changed. Spanish immigrants were mainly Galicians and Basques.[23][24] Millions of immigrants also came from France (notably Béarn and the Northern Basque Country), Germany, Switzerland, Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Ireland, Greece, Portugal, Finland, Russia and the United Kingdom.[25] The Welsh settlement in Patagonia, known as Y Wladfa, began in 1865; mainly along the coast of Chubut Province. In addition to the main colony in Chubut, a smaller colony was set up in Santa Fe and another group settled at Coronel Suárez, southern Buenos Aires Province.[26] Of the 50,000 Patagonians of Welsh descent, about 5,000 are Welsh speakers.[27] The community is centered around the cities of Gaiman, Trelew and Trevelin.[28]

Recent immigrants[edit]

Foreign born residents in Argentina by country of birth.[29]

According to the INDEC 1,531,940 of the Argentine resident population in 2001 were born outside Argentina, representing 4.22% of the total Argentine resident population.[30][31] In 2010, 1,805,957 of the Argentine resident population were born outside Argentina, representing 4.50% of the total Argentine resident population.[30][31][32][33]

Illegal immigration has been a recent factor in Argentine demographics. Most illegal immigrants come from Bolivia and Paraguay, countries which border Argentina to the north. Smaller numbers arrive from Peru and Ecuador. The Argentine government estimates that 750,000 inhabitants lack official documents and has launched a program called Patria Grande ("Greater Homeland")[34] to encourage illegal immigrants to regularize their status; so far over 670,000 applications have been processed under the program.[35]

Rank (2010) Country of birth census 2010 census 2001 census 1990
1  Paraguay 550,713 325,046 254,115
2  Bolivia 345,272 233,464 145,670
3  Chile 191,147 212,429 247,987
4  Peru 157,514 88,260 15,939
5  Italy 147,499 216,718 356,923
6  Uruguay 116,592 117,564 135,406
7  Spain 94,030 134,417 244,212
8  Brazil 41,330 34,712 33,966
9  China 8,929 4,184 2,297
10  Germany 8,416 10,362 15,451
11  South Korea 7,321 8,290 8,371
12  France 6,995 6,578 6,309
13  Japan 4,036 4,753 5,674
14  Taiwan 2,875 3,511 1,870
15  Syria 1,337 2,350 N/D
16  Lebanon 933 1,619 3,171
Other countries 121,018 127,683 150,849
TOTAL 1,805,957 1,531,940 1,628,210

Languages[edit]

The official language of Argentina is Spanish, and it is spoken by practically the entire population in several different accents.[citation needed] The most common accent of Castilian in Argentina is Rioplatense Spanish, and it is so named because it evolved in the central areas around the Río de la Plata basin. Its distinctive feature is widespread voseo, the use of the pronoun vos instead of for the second person singular.

Non-indigenous minority languages[edit]

Many Argentines also speak other European languages (Italian, Portuguese, French, Welsh, German, Swedish and Croatian, as examples) due to the vast number of immigrants from Europe that came to Argentina.[2]

English language is a required subject in many schools, and there are also many private English-teaching academies and institutions. Young people have become accustomed to English through movies and the Internet, and knowledge of the language is also required in most jobs, so most middle-class children and teenagers now speak, read and/or understand it with various degrees of proficiency. According to an official cultural consumption survey conducted in 2006, 42.3% of Argentines claim to speak some English (though only 15.4% of those claimed to have a high level of English comprehension).[5]

Standard German is spoken by around 500,000[36][37] Argentines of German ancestry, though the number may be as high as 3,800,000 according to some sources.[38] German is the third or fourth most spoken language in Argentina.

There are sources of around one million Levantine Arabic speakers in Argentina,[36] as a result of immigration from the Middle East, mostly from Syria and Lebanon.

There is a prosperous community of Argentine Welsh-speakers of approximately 25,000[39] in the province of Chubut, in the Patagonia region, who descend from 19th century immigrants.

Religion[edit]

The 17th century Cathedral of Córdoba

The Constitution guarantees freedom of religion, but until 1994 the President and Vice President had to be Catholic. The society, culture, and politics of Argentina are deeply imbued with Roman Catholicism.

Estimates for the number of Roman Catholics vary from 70% of the population,[40] to as much as 90%.[41] The CIA Factbook lists 92% of the country is Catholic, but only 20% are practicing regularly or weekly at a church service.,[2] the Jewish population is about 300,000(around 2% of the population). The community numbered about 400,000 after World War II, but the appeal of Israel and economic and cultural pressures at home led many to leave; recent instability in Israel has resulted in a modest reversal of the trend since 2003.[41][42] Muslim Argentines number about 500,000–600,000, or approximately 1.5% of the population; 93% of them are Sunni.[41] Buenos Aires is home to one of the largest mosques in Latin America. A recent study found that approximately 11% of Argentines are non-religious, including those who believe in God, though not religion, agnostics (4%) and atheists (5%). Overall, 24% attended religious services regularly. Protestants were the only group in which a majority regularly attended services.[43]

Gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Index Mundi 2011 Argentina
  2. ^ a b c d Argentina entry at The World Factbook
  3. ^ "Proyecciones provinciales de población por sexo y grupos de edad 2001–2015" (pdf). Gustavo Pérez (in español). INDEC. p. 16. Retrieved 2008-06-24. 
  4. ^ Censo 2010: Censo Nacional de Población, Hogares y Viviendas (Spanish)
  5. ^ a b Página/12, 27 December 2006. Los idiomas de los argentinos.
  6. ^ a b Population Division of the Department of Economic and Social Affairs of the United Nations Secretariat, World Population Prospects: The 2010 Revision
  7. ^ a b c "Major Cities". Government of Argentina. Retrieved 2009-09-03. 
  8. ^ "Ubicacion". Directorate-General of Tourism, Municipality of the City of Salta. Retrieved 2009-09-03.  (Spanish)
  9. ^ a b [1]
  10. ^ a b [2]
  11. ^ Rock, David. Argentina, 1516–1982. University of California Press, 1987.
  12. ^ "EDELAP – 120 años de alumbrado público". Edelap.com.ar. Retrieved 2010-04-25. 
  13. ^ a b 2010 Census provisional results
  14. ^ B.R. Mitchell. International historical statistics: the Americas, 1750-2000.
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