Demographics of Yukon

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Yukon is the westernmost of Canada's three northern territories. Its capital is Whitehorse. People from Yukon are known as Yukoners (French: Yukonnais).

Estimated population of Yukon: 30,989 (July 2007 est[1])

Percentage of Canadian population : 0.1%

Population growth rate for 2007: -0.7%

Population of Yukon since 1901[edit]

Year Population Five-year
% change
Ten-year
% change
Rank among provinces
and territories
1901 27,219 n/a n/a 10
1911 8,512 n/a -68.7 10
1921 4,157 n/a -51.1 1
1931 4,230 n/a 1.8 11
1941 4,914 n/a 16.2 11
1951 9,096 n/a 85.1 12
1956 12,190 34.0 n/a 12
1961 14,628 20.0 60.8 12
1966 14,382 -1.7 18.0 12
1971 18,390 27.9 25.7 12
1976 21,835 18.7 51.8 12
1981 23,150 6.0 25.9 12
1986 23,505 1.5 7.6 12
1991 27,797 18.3 20.1 12
1996 30,766 10.7 30.9 12
2001 28,674 -6.8 3.2 12
2006 30,372 5.9 -1.3 12
2011 33,897 11.6 18.2 12

Source: Statistics Canada [2][3][4]

Major communities[edit]

The largest communities by population
Municipality 2011 2006 2001
Whitehorse 23,276 20,461 19,058
Dawson 1,319 1,327 1,251
Watson Lake 802 846 912
Haines Junction 593 589 531
Carmacks 503 425 431
Mt. Lorne 408 370 379
Tagish 391 222 206
Ross River 352 313 337
Ibex Valley 346 376 315
Faro 344 341 313
Carcross 342 331 152
Pelly Crossing 336 296 328
Old Crow 245 253 299
Mayo 226 248 267

Ethnicity[edit]

Predominant origins[edit]

Main ethnic origins in Yukon in the 2006[5]
Ancestry 2006 2006 (% of Yukon population)
Flag of Canada.svg Aboriginal 14,880 negligible (no data)
Flag of England.svg English 8,790 negligible (no data)
Flag of France.svg French 8,695 negligible (no data)
Flag of Scotland.svg Scottish 7,005 negligible (no data)
Flag of Canada.svg Canadian 6,070 negligible (no data)
Flag of Ireland.svg Irish 5,735 negligible (no data)
Flag of Germany.svg German 4,835 negligible (no data)
Flag of Ukraine.svg Ukrainian 1,620 negligible (no data)
Flag of the Netherlands.svg Dutch 1,475 negligible (no data)
Flag of Norway.svg Norwegian 1,340 negligible (no data)

Visible minorities and Aboriginals[edit]

Yukon to Canada Comparison[6]
Total population Total aboriginal First Nation Métis Inuit Multiple Other Percentage of total
Yukon Total 30,650 6,175 5,330 550 95 30 170 20.1%
Male 15,810 2,965 2,850 260 40 10 80 18.7%
Female 14,840 3,210 2,750 290 55 20 90 21.6%
Canada Total 28,528,125 799,010 529,035 204,115 40,225 6,415 19,215 2.8%
Male 14,046,880 390,870 258,330 101,435 20,180 3,175 7,750 2.8%
Female 14,481,245 408,140 270,700 102,685 20,040 3,240 11,465 2.8%
Communities in order of percent of aboriginal population [6]
Rk Name Total pop. Aboriginal pop. Percent Rk Name Total pop. Aboriginal pop. Percent
1 Upper Liard 110 110 100% 12 Beaver Creek w130 60 46.1%
2 Two Mile Village 100 100 100% 13 Haines Junction 575 230 40.0%
3 Two and 1/2 Mile Village 40 40 100% 14 Ibex Valley 320 90 28.2%
4 Old Crow 280 250 89.3% 15 Watson Lake 995 220 27.1%
5 Pelly Crossing 240 205 84.5% 16 Dawson City 1280 345 26.9%
6 Ross River 350 275 78.6% 17 Tagish 165 40 26.7%
7 Carcross 275 185 67.3% 18 "Unorganised" 1855 345 18.6%
8 Burwash Landing 60 40 66.7% 19 Whitehorse 20,960 2,775 13.2%
9 Teslin 305 195 63.9% 20 Mount Lorne 400 35 8.75%
10 Carmacks 465 295 63.4% 21 Faro 1260 80 6.34%
11 Mayo 320 200 62.5% 22 Stewart Crossing 45 0 0%
Visible minority and Aboriginal population (Canada 2006 Census)
Population group Population  % of total population
White 21,395 70.9%
Visible minority group
Source:[7]
South Asian 195 0.6%
Chinese 325 1.1%
Black 125 0.4%
Filipino 210 0.7%
Latin American 100 0.3%
Arab 20 0.1%
Southeast Asian 145 0.5%
West Asian 10 0%
Korean 10 0%
Japanese 40 0.1%
Visible minority, n.i.e. 15 0%
Multiple visible minority 40 0.1%
Total visible minority population 1,220 4%
Aboriginal group
Source:[8]
First Nations 6,280 20.8%
Métis 800 2.6%
Inuit 255 0.8%
Aboriginal, n.i.e. 190 0.6%
Multiple Aboriginal identity 55 0.2%
Total Aboriginal population 7,580 25.1%
Total population 30,195 100%

Languages[edit]

The 2006 Canadian census showed a population of 30,372.
Of the 29,940 singular responses to the census question concerning 'mother tongue' the most commonly reported languages were:

1. English 25,655 85.69%
2. French 1,105 3.69%
3. German 775 2.59%
4. Athapaskan languages 650 2.17%
Gwich'in 75 0.25%
North Slavey 30 0.10%
5. Chinese languages 260 0.87%
Cantonese 85 0.28%
Mandarin 70 0.23%
6. Malayo-Polynesian languages 165 0.55%
Tagalog 145 0.48%
7. Dutch 140 0.47%
8. Spanish 130 0.43%
9. Vietnamese 105 0.35%
10. Yugoslavian languages 95 0.32%
Slovenian 45 0.15%
11= Hungarian 80 0.27%
11= Panjabi 80 0.27%
13. Tlingit 70 0.23%
14= Algonquian languages 55 0.18%
Cree 50 0.17%
14= Russian 55 0.18%
14= Inuktitut 55 0.18%

There were also about 40 single-language responses for Ukrainian; 30 each for Czech and the Scandinavian languages; and about 25 single-language responses each for Italian and Japanese. In addition, there were also 130 responses of both English and a 'non-official language'; 10 of both French and a 'non-official language'; 110 of both English and French; and about 175 people who either did not respond to the question, or reported multiple non-official languages, or else gave some other unenumerated response. The Yukon's official languages are shown in bold. (Figures shown are for the number of single language responses and the percentage of total single-language responses.)[9]

Migration[edit]

Immigration[edit]

The 2006 Canadian census counted a total of 3,010 immigrants living in Yukon.
The most commonly reported countries of birth for these immigrants were: [10]

1. United States 600
2. United Kingdom 555
3. Germany 405
4. Philippines 160
5. Switzerland 125
6. Netherlands 110
7. Vietnam 90
8. China 85
9. former Yugoslavia 80
10. France 75
11. India 70
12. Hungary 50

There were also about forty immigrants from Austria and New Zealand, thirty from the Czech Republic and South Africa, and about twenty-five each from Belgium, Ireland and Poland.

Internal migration[edit]

A total of 7,400 people moved to Yukon from other parts of Canada between 1996 and 2006 while 10,505 people moved in the opposite direction. These movements resulted in a net influx of 230 from the Northwest Territories; and a net outmigration of 2,505 to Alberta, 915 to British Columbia and 115 to New Brunswick. There was a net influx of 120 francophones from Quebec during this period. (All net inter-provincial and official minority movements of more than 100 persons are given.)[11][12]

See also[edit]

YT
Canadian Provinces and Territories
Demographics of Canada's provinces and territories

References[edit]