Demolished churches in New York City

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

17th century[edit]

1630s construction[edit]

1640s construction[edit]

1690s construction[edit]

18th century[edit]

1710s construction[edit]

1720s construction[edit]

  • Middle Collegiate Church (1729), Nassau Street near Cedar—Built in 1729, "a North Church was added in 1769, to serve a growing congregation."[1] The church "later became the Post Office, and was demolished in 1882."[5]

1740s construction[edit]

  • The Old Brick Church (New York City) (1767), predecessor congregation of Brick Presbyterian Church (New York City), located on the northeast corner of Beekman and Nassau Streets – A five-bay double-height Federalist-styled Presbyterian church, built 1767 to designs by John McComb Sr.. It was rectangular in plan with a projecting square-in-plan four-stage tower (final stage setback) with a three-stage round colonaded spire extension. It was illustrated in 1856 for Frank Leslie’s Illustrated, who reported that the land was “probably the most valuable in the city.” The city planned to put a post office on the site that year but the deal fell through and “the congregation managed to sell the property to the New York Times which put up a building on the site in 1857-1858.” [6]

1760s construction[edit]

1780s construction[edit]

  • Trinity Church (1788–1790), Wall Street—Building began in 1788, it was consecrated in 1790, and torn down after being weakened by severe snows during the winter of 1838–39. The present (third) Trinity Church, completed in 1846 to designs by Richard Upjohn, with its 281-foot (86 m) spire and cross was the highest point in New York until being surpassed in 1890 by the New York World Building.

19th century[edit]

1800s construction[edit]

St. John's Episcopal c. 1867
  • St. John's Chapel (New York City) (1803) -- A chapel in the Episcopal parish of Trinity Church (New York City)Built 1803 to designed by John McComb Jr. and his brother Isaac McComb on Varrick Street with a sandstone tetra-style prostyle portico with supporting a tower (with spire) rose tow 214.25 feet. The chancel was added in 1857 to designs by Richard M. Upjohn. The congregation had left in the 1890s and the structure was torn down in 1918.[7] It was cleared during a road-widening scheme for New York City’s Varrick Street involved city officials fighting to allow the portico to protrude into the widened street and vault the flanking pedestrian sidewalk under the portico because they recognized the portico and attached five-stage steeple’s landmark importance to the city while its Episcopal owners sought ways to demolish the building.[8][9]
  • Second Reformed Dutch Church of Richmondtown (1808), located on Arthur Kill Road on the site of the first church (burned during the American Revolution) and near the second county courthouse (burned in the 1930s) in Historic Richmondtown, Staten Island. The church was moved in 1888 and demolished in 1903.[4]

1810s construction[edit]

1820s construction[edit]

1830s construction[edit]

1840s construction[edit]

  • St. George's Church (New York City) (c.1840), East 7th Street, between Hall Place and Second Ave—A Ukrainian Catholic in the East Village, it was later termed the Old Building by the new Ukrainian Catholic owners before being demolished in 1977: The AIA Guide to NYC described it as “A Greek Revival temple in stucco, with a mini-onion dome.” The new similarly named building on (E. 7th Street southeast corner of Hall Place) was built 1977 to designs by Apollinaire Osadca. The AIA regretted the “domed symbol of the parish’s wealth and burgeoning membership: Miami Beach on 7th Street replaces the real Greek Revival thing.”[24]
  • St. Ann's Church (Manhattan) (c.1840) -- Sold to the Roman Catholics as the new parish of the same dedication, established in 1852. That parish left 1871 and the church was demolished around 1880.
  • Mount Washington Church (New York City) (1844, enlarged 1856), Broadway and Dyckman Street, a timber Carpentry Gothic church with crenelated tower and spire.[25]
  • Church of the Divine Unity (New York City) (c.1845) -- located in SoHo, built for the Unitarians and transferred to the Universalists before it was used as an art gallery, then an office, and finally was demolished sometime before 1866.[26]
  • Hanson Place Central Methodist Church (Brooklyn, New York) (1847), northwest corner of Hanson Place and Saint Felix Street — A Methodist Episcopal church demolished in 1927 and rebuilt c.1930 as a Gothic church “restyled in modern dress, an exercise in massing brick and limestone. The street level contains retail stores, a surprising but intelligent adjunct to churchly economics.”[27]

1850s construction[edit]

Demolition of the Rivington Street building of the First Roumanian-American Congregation, formerly the First German Presbyterian Church (c.1857). The building was surrounded on the first floor by plywood hoarding. The second and third floors are partially open to the street, and the interior can be seen. Part of the roof has also been torn away, and the joists and trusses are exposed.

1860s construction[edit]

  • Incarnation Episcopal Church (Manhattan) (1864–1865), Thirty-fifth Street and Madison Avenue—Built 1865 to design by Element T. Littell, the church as "distinguished for both its architecture and refined interior decoration and artwork." It was destroyed by fire in 1882, except for its tower and walls and rebuilt and enlarged by David Jardine, with a spire added 1896 to Jardine's designs by Heins and LaFarge.[29]
  • West Presbyterian Church (New York City) (1865), 31 West 42nd Street -- "In 1860, following the northward movement of Manhattan’s population, [the congregation] was relocated [from Greenwich Village]...and soon built a Victorian Gothic-style edifice.... West Presbyterian counted a number of distinguished citizens among its membership, including Russell Sage, Jay Gould, and Alfred H. Smith, and by 1890 had become known as the millionaires’ gate to heaven. By the early 20th century, commercialization of its midtown location led to the displacement of the area’s residential population and the loss of many of West Presbyterian’s members, including the prominent men mentioned above after an internal dispute. As a consequence, [West and Park Presbyterian] began competing for members and decided to merge their memberships, forming the West-Park Presbyterian Church (New York City)." "The deal between the two organizations included the construction of a new church in Washington Heights at 175th Street and Wadsworth Avenue, called the Fort Washington Presbyterian Church (New York City), which remained affiliated with West Park until 1923."[20]

1870s construction[edit]

1880s construction[edit]

  • The Church of the Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary / St. Charles Chapel (1885), President Street off of Van Brunt Street—Established 1882 by Fr. Joseph Fransioli in St. Peter’s Church (corner of Warren and Hicks Streets) as the Catholic Mission of the Italian Colony of the City of Brooklyn, which was the first parish established specifically for Italian immigrants on Long Island. The church was opened in May 1885 but by 1900 a new structure was needed.[33] "During the time on President Street Mother Cabrini came to work at the parish of Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary. Recognizing a need to educate the Italian immigrant children, Mother Cabrini and her sisters established a school in the parish in 1892, which was placed under the direction of her order.[34] After the 1906 completion of the new church, Father Vogel felt it necessary to keep the prior church building at President Street open to serve the community as a chapel for the parish under the title of Saint Charles Chapel.[33] The new church was demolished in 1942, condemned by Robert Moses for the BQE.
  • The Church of Our Lady of the Scapular of Mount Carmel (New York City) (c.1889), 341 East 28th Street—Founded in 1889, designed in a "Country Gothic" style. It was previously staffed by the Carmelite Fathers and was the original location of the National Shrine of Our Lady of Mount Carmel, which had been established in 1941 and was moved to Middletown. "Our Lady of the Scapular was merged into Church of St. Stephen the Martyr (New York City) in the 1980s, and the original building was razed. In January 2007, the Archdiocese of New York announced that the Church of the Sacred Hearts of Mary and Jesus (New York City), located at 307 East 33rd Street, would be merged into Our Lady of the Scapular-St. Stephen Church."[35]

1890s construction[edit]

20th century[edit]

1900s construction[edit]

1910s construction[edit]

1920s construction[edit]

1950s construction[edit]

1960s construction[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Congregation History
  2. ^ "TRINITY CHURCH PROPERTY.; Outline of the Legal History of the Trinity "Church Farm."". The New York Times. November 18, 1859. 
  3. ^ Trinity Church - Historical Timeline
  4. ^ a b c Historic Richmondtown Village Map
  5. ^ a b Nathan Silver, Lost New York, (New York: Weathervane Books, 1967), p.147
  6. ^ Nathan Silver, Lost New York, (New York: Weathervane Books, 1967), p.146
  7. ^ Nathan Silver, Lost New York, (New York: Weathervane Books, 1967), p.151-152
  8. ^ J. Russiello, A Sympathetic Planning Hierarchy for Redundant Churches: A Comparison of Continued Use and Reuse in Denmark, England and the United States of America (MSc Conservation of Historic Buildings, University of Bath, 2008), p.26-31.
  9. ^ Christopher Gray. "STREETSCAPES: A Chapel the City Fought to Save" New York Times (April 27, 2008).
  10. ^ Robert A. M. Stern, Thomas Mellins, and David Fishman. New York 1880: Architecture and Urbanism in the Gilded Age (New York: The Monacelli Press, 1999), pp.735.
  11. ^ J. Russiello, A Sympathetic Planning Hierarchy for Redundant Churches: A Comparison of Continued Use and Reuse in Denmark, England and the United States of America (MSc Conservation of Historic Buildings, University of Bath, 2008), p.395.
  12. ^ a b St Philip's Church History (Accessed 2 August 2010)
  13. ^ Loveland, etc., From Meetinghouse to Megachurch, p.27.
  14. ^ Review in The New York Evangelist quoted in Keith J. Hardman, Charles Grandison Finney, 1792-1875: Revivalist and Reformer (Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 1987), p.252.
  15. ^ Nathan Silver, Lost New York, (New York: Weathervane Books, 1967), p.46
  16. ^ J. Russiello, A Sympathetic Planning Hierarchy for Redundant Churches: A Comparison of Continued Use and Reuse in Denmark, England and the United States of America (MSc Conservation of Historic Buildings, University of Bath, 2008), p.216.
  17. ^ Dunlap, David W. From Abyssinian to Zion: A Guide to Manhattan's Houses of Worship, Columbia University Press, 2004, p. 260.
  18. ^ Israelowitz, Oscar. Synagogues of New York City: A Pictorial Survey in 123 Photographs, Dover Publications, 1982, p. 63.
  19. ^ Nathan Silver, Lost New York, (New York: Weathervane Books, 1967), p.144
  20. ^ a b New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission. "Designation List 425"
  21. ^ Nathan Silver, Lost New York, (New York: Weathervane Books, 1967), p.76.
  22. ^ J. Russiello, A Sympathetic Planning Hierarchy for Redundant Churches: A Comparison of Continued Use and Reuse in Denmark, England and the United States of America (MSc Conservation of Historic Buildings, University of Bath, 2008), p.217.
  23. ^ Kathryn E. Holliden, Leopold Eidlitz: Architecture and Idealism in the Gilded Age (New York: W. W. Norton and Company, 2008), p.171
  24. ^ Norval White and Elliot Willensky, AIA Guide to New York City, rev. ed., (New York: Collier Books, 1978), p.101.
  25. ^ Nathan Silver, Lost New York, (New York: Weathervane Books, 1967), p.144-145
  26. ^ J. Russiello, A Sympathetic Planning Hierarchy for Redundant Churches: A Comparison of Continued Use and Reuse in Denmark, England and the United States of America (MSc Conservation of Historic Buildings, University of Bath, 2008), p.131.
  27. ^ Norval White and Elliot Willensky, AIA Guide to New York City, rev. ed., (New York: Collier Books, 1978), p.405.
  28. ^ Kleindeutschland and the Lower East Side, Manhattan
  29. ^ Donald Martin Reynolds (1994). The Architecture of New York City: Histories and Views of Important Structures, Sites, and Symbols. Rev. Ed. New York: John Wiley & Sons. p. 118. ISBN 0-471-01439-7. 
  30. ^ Norval White and Elliot Willensky, AIA Guide to New York City, rev. ed., (New York: Collier Books, 1978), p.289.
  31. ^ J. Russiello, A Sympathetic Planning Hierarchy for Redundant Churches: A Comparison of Continued Use and Reuse in Denmark, England and the United States of America (MSc Conservation of Historic Buildings, University of Bath, 2008), p.351, 352.
  32. ^ Nathan Silver, Lost New York, (New York: Weathervane Books, 1967), p.149
  33. ^ a b c Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary – St. Stephen
  34. ^ – Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary and St. Stephen Brief History
  35. ^ a b Our Lady of the Scapular–St. Stephen (Roman Catholic)
  36. ^ Norval White and Elliot Willensky, AIA Guide to New York City, rev. ed., (New York: Collier Books, 1978), p.184.
  37. ^ J. Russiello, A Sympathetic Planning Hierarchy for Redundant Churches: A Comparison of Continued Use and Reuse in Denmark, England and the United States of America (MSc Conservation of Historic Buildings, University of Bath, 2008), p.351, 353.
  38. ^ Nathan Silver, Lost New York, (New York: Weathervane Books, 1967), p.401
  39. ^ J. Russiello, A Sympathetic Planning Hierarchy for Redundant Churches: A Comparison of Continued Use and Reuse in Denmark, England and the United States of America] (MSc Conservation of Historic Buildings, University of Bath, 2008), p.367.
  40. ^ J. Russiello, A Sympathetic Planning Hierarchy for Redundant Churches: A Comparison of Continued Use and Reuse in Denmark, England and the United States of America (MSc Conservation of Historic Buildings, University of Bath, 2008), p.129.
  41. ^ Margaret Maliszewski, “Designation List 219: “Trinity School and the Former St. Agnes Parish House,” (New York: Landmarks Preservation Commission, 1989), p.5-6.
  42. ^ Sailors' Snug Harbor Information Plaque / American Architect and Building News Oct 25, 1899
  43. ^ Queens Parishes, listed in order established, Queens Parishes, Diocese of Brooklyn, Local Catholic Church History and Catholic Ancestors, New York, home.att.net
  44. ^ St. Sebastian Roman Catholic Church, Queens Federation of Churches, Directory of Queens Congregations, queenschurches.org
  45. ^ The Founding of St. Sebastian's, Our History, St. Sebastian Roman Catholic Church, stsebastianwoodside.org
  46. ^ "Franz J. Berlenbach", City Planning Commission, June 23, 2004/Calendar No.15 N 040463 HKK, nyc.gov
  47. ^ Nathan Silver, Lost New York, (New York: Weathervane Books, 1967), p.148
  48. ^ NYPL Digital Images
  49. ^ Our Faith always brought us here . . .
  50. ^ New York Landmarks Conservancy recently as demolished and undergoing redevelopment Advocacy for Threatened Sacred Sites
  51. ^ Office for Metropolitan History, "Manhattan NB Database 1900-1986," (Accessed 25 Dec 2010).
  52. ^ Albert Amateau, “Washington Square Church Is Sold,” The Villager 75, no. 10 (27 July 2005).
  53. ^ J. Russiello, A Sympathetic Planning Hierarchy for Redundant Churches: A Comparison of Continued Use and Reuse in Denmark, England and the United States of America (MSc Conservation of Historic Buildings, University of Bath, 2008), p.351, 353.