Denhoff, North Dakota

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Denhoff
Census-designated place & unincorporated community
Denhoff is located in North Dakota
Denhoff
Denhoff
Location within the state of North Dakota
Coordinates: 47°29′00″N 100°15′44″W / 47.48333°N 100.26222°W / 47.48333; -100.26222Coordinates: 47°29′00″N 100°15′44″W / 47.48333°N 100.26222°W / 47.48333; -100.26222
Country United States
State North Dakota
County Sheridan
Area[1]
 • Total 0.658 sq mi (1.70 km2)
 • Land 0.658 sq mi (1.70 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 2,031 ft (619 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 20
 • Density 30/sq mi (12/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP codes 58430
FIPS code[3] 38-19060
GNIS feature ID[3] 2584340

Denhoff is a census-designated place in central Sheridan County, North Dakota, United States. An unincorporated community, it was designated as part of the U.S. Census Bureau's Participant Statistical Areas Program on March 31, 2010.[4] It was not counted separately during the 2000 Census,[5] but was included in the 2010 Census,[6] where a population of 20 was reported.[2]

It lies along North Dakota Highway 200 east of the city of McClusky, the county seat of Sheridan County.[4] Although it is included on one website as a ghost town,[citation needed] it has a functioning post office, with the ZIP code of 58430.[7] and a church, as well as 9 inhabited houses sheltering a population of 17. In 2009, a seed packaging plant began operations in Denhoff as well. The city is currently unincorporated and has no formal government of its own.

Historically, Denhoff functioned as a service town for the regional farming community, which began in decline after the 1960s. In the 1950s, its population reached its maximum of over 350 residents, and in addition to the post office and church, services consisted of a school, a gas station, and a bar. The expansion of corporately-managed big farms during the 1970s led to a major loss of population to unemployment in both the city and the surrounding countryside, which in turn led to closure of most of the service operations and further loss of populace.

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