Denis Napthine

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The Honourable
Denis Napthine
MLA
Premier Denis Napthine.jpg
47th Premier of Victoria
Incumbent
Assumed office
6 March 2013
Governor Alex Chernov
Preceded by Ted Baillieu
Leader of the Opposition of Victoria
In office
26 October 1999 – 20 August 2002
Deputy Louise Asher
Preceded by Jeff Kennett
Succeeded by Robert Doyle
Minister for Ports, Regional Cities, Racing and Major Projects
Incumbent
Assumed office
2 December 2010
Premier Ted Baillieu
Himself
Preceded by Tim Pallas
Treasurer of Victoria
In office
7 October 1999 – 20 October 1999
Premier Jeff Kennett
Preceded by Alan Stockdale
Succeeded by Steve Bracks
Minister for Youth and Community Services
In office
30 March 1996 – 18 September 1999
Premier Jeff Kennett
Member of the Victorian Parliament
for South-West Coast
Incumbent
Assumed office
30 November 2002
Preceded by New seat
Member of the Victorian Parliament
for Portland
In office
1 October 1988 – 30 November 2002
Preceded by Digby Crozier
Succeeded by Seat abolished
Personal details
Born Denis Vincent Napthine
(1952-03-06) 6 March 1952 (age 62)
Geelong, Victoria, Australia
Citizenship Australian
Political party Liberal Party of Australia
Spouse(s) Peggy
Alma mater University of Melbourne
Deakin University
Profession Veterinarian
Religion Roman Catholicism
Website www.premier.vic.gov.au/

Denis Vincent Napthine (born 6 March 1952) is an Australian politician for the Liberal Party of Australia and the 47th Premier of Victoria. Napthine is a member of the Victorian Legislative Assembly, representing the electoral district of South-West Coast. He was elected leader of the Parliamentary Liberal Party on 6 March 2013 following the resignation of Ted Baillieu, and was sworn in as Premier on the same day. He leads a minority government.

Early life[edit]

Napthine was born in 1952 to Len and Theresa Napthine in Geelong, Victoria. He was the third in a family of ten children.[1][2][3]

Napthine spent his early school years at Winchelsea State School before attending Chanel College, a Catholic boys' school in Lovely Banks near Geelong. After graduating he attended the University of Melbourne, where he studied to be a veterinarian, undertaking a bachelor's and then a master's degree in veterinary science. He later completed a master's degree in business administration from Deakin University.[1][3]

Political career[edit]

Napthine earlier in his political career.

Napthine was elected to the Victorian Legislative Assembly in 1988 as member for the country seat of Portland. He was re-elected in 1992, 1996 and 1999. The electorate of Portland was abolished in the 2002 redivision, and the bulk of its territory became part of the newly created district of South-West Coast, and Naphtine sought re-election there. He barely held onto this seat at the November 2002 election, but was re-elected in November 2006 with an increased margin.[4]

Kennett ministry[edit]

He was appointed Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for Health in 1992 and then promoted to Minister for Youth and Community Services in 1996 in Jeff Kennett's Liberal government, a position he held from 1996 to 1999.[4]

Leader of the Opposition[edit]

Following the defeat of the Liberal Party at the 1999 election, Kennett resigned as Liberal leader, and Napthine was elected to take his place. Napthine had briefly served as Deputy Liberal Leader, having been elected to the position just shortly before Kennett stood down as Liberal Leader. During his term as Opposition Leader the Liberal–National coalition split, fracturing the opposition parties.

Under Napthine's leadership, the Liberal Party did poorly in the polls and did not make any significant electoral inroads on the ruling Labor government. Shortly before the 2002 state election, Robert Doyle challenged Napthine for the leadership of the Liberal Party. Doyle won the leadership by a narrow margin, but went on to lead the party to its worst electoral defeat ever, in which Napthine nearly lost the seat that he was contesting.

Baillieu ministry[edit]

After the Liberals won the 2010 Victorian election, Napthine was made a member of the Baillieu cabinet. He served as the Minister for Ports, Racing, Regional Cities and Major Projects.[4][5]

Premier of Victoria[edit]

On 6 March 2013, his 61st birthday, Napthine was elected Leader of the Victorian Parliamentary Liberal Party in place of Baillieu, who had resigned the leadership.[6] After the resignation of Geoff Shaw from the parliamentary Liberal Party earlier in the day, Napthine began leadership of a minority government, holding 43 seats (44 seats including that of the Speaker) to Labor's 43 seats, with Shaw sitting an independent politician on the crossbench.

On 28 November 2013 Australian media reported that Napthine had 'secretly assisted' Shaw to draft a Private Member's Bill to change state abortion legislation which Denis Napthine voted against in 2008.[1][7][8][9] Napthine refuted the allegations and stated his Government had no plans to change abortion laws,[10][11] nor would he support any such change. In June 2014 Napthine stated:[12]

"...that while I am Premier of this state, I will not allow Mr Shaw to introduce any legislation seeking to change the abortion laws in Victoria."

In May 2014 a parliamentary privileges committee found that Shaw was not diligent in the use of his parliamentary car and fuel card.[13] On 3 June 2014 Shaw told radio station 774 ABC Melbourne that he would support a no confidence motion in the Napthine government.[14] On 11 June 2014, following a Labor move to expel Shaw from Parliament that was defeated on party lines with the support of the speaker, Napthine's government successfully moved a motion that resulted in the Members of the Legislative Assembly suspending Shaw for a period of eleven days, fined Shaw A$6,838, and ordered Shaw to apologise to the Parliament upon his return.[15] Shaw's suspension followed a period of political instability under Napthine's leadership.[16][17][18]

Personal life[edit]

Napthine and his wife Peggy have three children. His younger brother, Simon, was the unsuccessful ALP candidate for the federal seat of Flinders at the 2004 election.[19]

One of Napthine's ancestors was convict Joseph Potaski.[20]

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Who is Denis Napthine?". ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation). 7 March 2013. Retrieved 7 March 2013. 
  2. ^ "Family Notices.". The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) (Melbourne, Vic.: National Library of Australia). 10 March 1952. p. 13. Retrieved 4 December 2013. 
  3. ^ a b Green, Shane (8 March 2013). "From country paddock to top job". The Age. Retrieved 8 March 2013. 
  4. ^ a b c "Members Information - Denis Napthine (South-West Coast)". Parliament of Victoria. Retrieved 8 March 2013. 
  5. ^ Austin, Paul; Colebatch, Tim (3 December 2010). "Baillieu promotes Lib ex-leader". The Age. Retrieved 19 December 2010. 
  6. ^ "Ted Baillieu resigns as Victoria premier, Denis Napthine takes over as Liberal leader". The Australian. 6 March 2013. Retrieved 6 March 2013. 
  7. ^ "Geoff Shaw dictating Coalition's agenda". News.com.au. 28 November 2013. Retrieved 27 November 2013. 
  8. ^ Ferguson, John (28 November 2013). "Denis Napthine secretly helped Geoff Shaw over abortion laws - report". The Herald-Sun. Retrieved 27 November 2013. 
  9. ^ Ferguson, John (28 November 2013). "Geoff Shaw dictating Coalition's agenda". The Australian. Retrieved 27 November 2013. 
  10. ^ Webb, Carolyn; Cook, Henrietta (4 December 2013). "Napthine vows he will not change abortion laws". The Age. Retrieved 4 December 2013. 
  11. ^ Denis Napthine - South-West Coast (LIB)
  12. ^ Tomazin, Farrah (8 June 2014). "Abortion debate not on, Denis Napthine pledges". The Age. Retrieved 12 June 2014. 
  13. ^ "Inquiry in relation to recommendation 2 of the Ombudsman’s report Whistleblowers Protection Act 2001: Investigation into allegations against Mr Geoff Shaw MP". Legislative Assembly Privileges Committee (PDF). Melbourne, Victoria: Parliament of Victoria. May 2014. p. 6. Retrieved 13 June 2014. 
  14. ^ Savage, Alison (4 June 2014). "Napthine-Andrews standoff over 'rorter' Geoff Shaw a battle of nerves". ABC News (ABC). Retrieved 4 June 2014. 
  15. ^ Uhlmann, Chris; Donovan, Samantha (12 June 2014). "Vic Parliament suspends Geoff Shaw". AM (ABC Radio) (streaming audio and transcript) (Australia). Retrieved 13 June 2014. 
  16. ^ Willingham, Richard; Cook, Henrietta; Gordon, Josh (11 June 2014). "Rogue MP Geoff Shaw suspended from Parliament". The Age. Retrieved 12 June 2014. 
  17. ^ Lillebuen, Steve (12 June 2014). "Geoff Shaw must be remorseful or be expelled, Denis Napthine warns". The Age. Retrieved 12 June 2014. 
  18. ^ Ferguson, John; Baxendale, Rachel (12 June 2014). "Rebel Victorian MP Geoff Shaw suspended and fined". The Australian. Retrieved 12 June 2014. 
  19. ^ "2004 Federal Election - Flinders Electorate Profile". ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation). 2004. Retrieved 8 March 2013. 
  20. ^ Purcell, Marie (1991). By degrees: a story of the Potaskie/McDonald family 1802–1987. M. Purcell. ISBN 0-646-05619-0. 
Victorian Legislative Assembly
Preceded by
Digby Crozier
Member for Portland
1988–2002
Seat abolished
Seat created Member for South-West Coast
2002–present
Incumbent
Political offices
Preceded by
Vin Heffernan
as Minister for Youth Affairs
Minister for Youth and Community Services
1996–1999
Succeeded by
Jacinta Allan
as Minister for Education Services and Youth Affairs
Preceded by
Michael John
as Minister for Community Services
Succeeded by
Christine Campbell
as Minister for Community Development
Preceded by
Alan Stockdale
Treasurer of Victoria
1999
Succeeded by
Steve Bracks
Preceded by
Steve Bracks
Leader of the Opposition of Victoria
1999–2002
Succeeded by
Robert Doyle
Preceded by
Tim Pallas
as Minister for Roads and Ports
Minister for Ports
2010–present
Incumbent
Minister for Major Projects
2010–present
Preceded by
Rob Hulls
Minister for Racing
2010–present
Preceded by
Jacinta Allan
as Minister for Regional and Rural Development
Minister for Regional Cities
2010–present
Preceded by
Ted Baillieu
Minister for the Arts
2013–present
Premier of Victoria
2013–present
Party political offices
Preceded by
Jeff Kennett
Leader of the Liberal Party in Victoria
1999–2002
Succeeded by
Robert Doyle
Preceded by
Ted Baillieu
Leader of the Liberal Party in Victoria
2013–present
Incumbent