Deorala

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Deorala
देवराला
Divrala
village
Country  India
State Rajasthan
District Sikar
Languages
 • Official Hindi
Time zone IST (UTC+5:30)
Nearest city Sri Madhopur, Sikar

Deorala is a village in the Sikar district of Rajasthan, India.

Deorala is a village in Shekhawati region. It is located near Amarsar which was the capital of Maharao Shekhaji, ancientor of all Shekhawat rajputs.

Deorala (or Divrala) became infamous because of the Sati incident that took place on 4 September 1987.[1]

Sati[edit]

The victim was a well educated 17 year old woman named Roop Kanwar, who was a resident of the village. Her husband, Mal Singh Shekhawat had died of disease. The rest of the details are not clearly known, as many claim that she took the decision to follow the ancient custom and died on the funeral pyre of her husband, while the general feeling is that she was forced by the villagers on to the pyre, perhaps after having been given some sedatives. After she had burnt to death, the place was converted into a memorial and thousands of people from surrounding regions started visiting it. Though afterwards that place was sealed to demote the cause of sati incidents further happening. However, there was no proper evidence of anyone forcing Roop Kanwar to become a Sati. Spectators say that she chose to be a Sati rather than living as a widow for her whole life. Local people even claim some miracles that happened to them when this whole incident went on. Sati Pratha was banned in India since the beginning of 19th century by British Government and in independent India also, Sati Pratha is an offense to law and order. That is why this incident became so popular and got the attention of whole world. Sati Pratha was a sacred ritual in Hindu religion in which a wife dies within the burning pyre of her husband, for some people it is divine love and for others it is a brutal act.

Although family members and others were booked in the incident, they were finally acquitted.[2][3] Many are not fully satisfied with the judgement.[4] Women's organizations pressurized the government to reopen the case [5]

Publications such as outlook magazine have highlighted positive developments from the village, such as election of a women sarpanch to highlight the change in people's perception of women's place in the society [6]

Population[edit]

The village population is over 9,000.


Coordinates: 27°24′N 75°46′E / 27.400°N 75.767°E / 27.400; 75.767

References[edit]

  1. ^ Deorala Episode: Women's Protest in Rajasthan Sharada Jain, Nirja Misra and Kavita Srivastava Economic and Political Weekly Vol. 22, No. 45 (Nov. 7, 1987), pp. 1891+1893-1894 (article consists of 3 pages) Published by: Economic and Political Weekly Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4377696
  2. ^ Accused in Deorala `sati' case acquitted http://www.hindu.com/2004/02/01/stories/2004020101110700.htm
  3. ^ `Sati' and the verdict http://www.frontlineonnet.com/fl2105/stories/20040312002504600.htm
  4. ^ Abraham, Susan.: The Deorala Judgement Glorifying Sati" by Susan Abraham. The Lawyers Collective. 12(6); June, 1997. p.4-12. http://www.womenstudies.in/elib/sati/sa_the_deorala.pdf
  5. ^ HC orders reopening of Deorala sati case http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/2004-08-07/open-space/27153961_1_sati-case-roop-kanwar-deorala
  6. ^ Showing The Way In Deorala http://www.outlookindia.com/article.aspx?204912