Department of Regional Australia, Local Government, Arts and Sport

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Department of Regional Australia, Local Government, Arts and Sport
Department overview
Formed 14 December 2011
Preceding Department Department of Regional Australia, Regional Development and Local Government
Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet (arts and sport functions)
Dissolved 18 September 2013
Superseding agency Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development (regional development and local government functions);
Attorney-General's Department (arts functions); and
Department of Health and Ageing (sport functions).
Jurisdiction Commonwealth of Australia
Employees 601 (at April 2013)[1]
Department executive Glenys Beauchamp, Secretary
Child agencies Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority
National Capital Authority
Australia Council for the Arts
Australian Film, Television and Radio School
Australian National Maritime Museum
Australian Sports Commission
Australian Institute of Sport
National Film and Sound Archive
National Gallery of Australia
National Library of Australia
National Museum of Australia
Screen Australia
Website regional.gov.au

The Department of Regional Australia, Local Government, Arts and Sport was an Australian government department.[2] It was formed in December 2011, absorbing the former Department of Regional Australia, Regional Development and Local Government along with Arts and Sport functions from the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet.[3] The department was abolished in September 2013 with its functions moved to other Australian Government departments.[4][5]

Scope[edit]

Information about the department's functions and/or government funding allocation could be found in the Administrative Arrangements Orders, the annual Portfolio Budget Statements, in the Department's annual reports and on the departmental website.

According to the Administrative Arrangements Order (AAO) made on 14 December 2011, the Department dealt with:[2]

  • Administration of the Jervis Bay Territory, the Territory of Cocos (Keeling) Islands, the Territory of Christmas Island, the Coral Sea Islands Territory, the Territory of Ashmore and Cartier Islands, and of Commonwealth responsibilities on Norfolk Island
  • Constitutional development of the Northern Territory
  • Constitutional development of the Australian Capital Territory
  • Delivery of regional and rural specific services
  • Planning and land management in the Australian Capital Territory
  • Regional development
  • Matters relating to local government
  • Regional Australia policy and co-ordination
  • Support for ministers and parliamentary secretaries with regional responsibilities
  • Cultural affairs, including movable cultural heritage and support for the arts
  • Sport and recreation
  • Management of government records
  • Old Parliament House

Subsequent AAOs issued on 9 February 2012 and 16 May 2013 omitted mention of 'Old Parliament House' and 'Support for ministers and parliamentary secretaries with regional responsibilities'.[6][7] The February 2012 and May 2013 AAOs also replaced the words 'delivery of regional and rural specific services' with 'delivery of regional and territory specific services and programs' and the words 'regional Australia policy and co-ordination' with 'regional policy and co-ordination'.[6][7]

Intended outcomes[edit]

The department worked to help the Government of the day achieve its policy objectives by contributing to, and reporting against four key outcomes. The 2011–12 departmental annual report (which was the only annual report released by the department during its short period of operation) identified the four outcomes as:[8]

  1. Coordinated community infrastructure in rural, regional and local government areas through financial assistance.
  2. Good governance in the Australian territories through the maintenance and improvement of the overarching legislative framework for selfgoverning territories, and laws and services for the non-self-governing territories.
  3. Participation in, and access to, Australia's arts and culture through developing and supporting cultural expression.
  4. Improved opportunities for community participation in sport and recreation, and excellence in high-performance athletes, including investment in sport infrastructure and events, research and international cooperation.

Structure[edit]

The department was administered by Australian public servants who were responsible to the Minister for Sport, the Minister for the Arts, and the minister and/or parliamentary secretary responsible for regional Australia and local government (given various titles during the life of the department).

The department's staff were headed by an executive group comprising the departmental Secretary, Ms Glenys Beauchamp PSM, and four deputy secretaries.[8] According to an estimate in the Australian Government Budget Papers, average staffing levels in the department during 2012-13 were 552, making it the second smallest of 20 portfolio departments that year.[9] Staff were located at 23 offices around Australia.[8] As at June 2012, 68 per cent of departmental staff were female.[8]

Ministers and parliamentary secretaries for the Department of Regional Australia, Local Government, Arts and Sport
Start date End date Ministerial title Minister Ref.
14 Dec 2011 4 Feb 2013 Minister for Regional Australia, Regional Development and Local Government
Minister for the Arts
Simon Crean [10]
14 Dec 2011 5 Mar 2012 Minister for Sport Mark Arbib [10]
5 Mar 2012 3 Jul 2013 Minister for Sport Kate Lundy [11][12]
25 Mar 2013 3 Jul 2013 Minister for Regional Development and Local Government Anthony Albanese [12]
25 Mar 2013 3 Jul 2013 Minister for Regional Services, Local Communities and Territories Catherine King [12]
3 Jul 2013 18 Sep 2013 Minister for Regional Australia, Local Government and Territories Catherine King [13]
25 Mar 2013 18 Sep 2013 Minister for the Arts Tony Burke [12][13]
3 Jul 2013 18 Sep 2013 Minister for Sport Don Farrell [13]
3 Jul 2013 18 Sep 2013 Minister for Regional Development Sharon Bird [13]
25 Mar 2013 18 Sep 2013 Parliamentary Secretary for the Arts Michael Danby [12][13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Australian Public Service Commission (2 December 2013), State of the Service Report: State of the Service Series 2012-13, Australian Public Service Commission, p. 253, archived from the original on 6 December 2013 
  2. ^ a b "Administrative Arrangements Order made on 14 December 2011". Australian Government Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet. Archived from the original on 27 February 2012. 
  3. ^ CA 9380: The Department of Regional Australia, Local Government, Arts and Sport, National Archives of Australia, retrieved 18 September 2013 
  4. ^ Noel Towell (18 September 2013). "Three public service department heads sacked by Abbott government". The Canberra Times (Fairfax Media). 
  5. ^ Tony Abbott (18 September 2013). "The Coalition will restore strong, stable and accountable government" (Press release). Canberra, Australia: Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet. Archived from the original on 20 September 2013. Retrieved 20 September 2013. 
  6. ^ a b "Administrative Arrangements Order made on 9 February 2012". Australian Government Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet. Archived from the original on 9 April 2013. 
  7. ^ a b "Administrative Arrangements Order made on 16 May 2013". Australian Government Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet. 16 May 2013. Retrieved 23 September 2013. 
  8. ^ a b c d "Department of Regional Australia, Local Government, Arts and Sport Annual Report 2011-12". Australian Government Department of Regional Australia, Local Government, Arts and Sport. October 2012. Archived from the original on 5 May 2013. 
  9. ^ Australian Government. "Budget Paper No. 1". 2013-14 Commonwealth Budget. Statement 6: Expenses and Net Capital Investment: Australian Government. Archived from the original on 24 September 2013. 
  10. ^ a b "Commonwealth Government Second Gillard Ministry 14 December 2011". Australian Government Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet. 14 December 2011. Archived from the original on 27 February 2012. 
  11. ^ "Commonwealth Government Second Gillard Ministry 13 March 2012". Australian Parliament House. Archived from the original on 20 March 2012. 
  12. ^ a b c d e "Commonwealth Government Second Gillard Ministry 25 March 2013". Australian Parliament House. Archived from the original on 28 April 2013. 
  13. ^ a b c d e "Commonwealth Government Second Rudd Ministry". Australian Parliament House. 3 July 2013. Archived from the original on 23 September 2013. 

External links[edit]