Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance

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The Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance (DBSA) (formerly the National Depressive and Manic Depressive Association or NDMDA) is a non-profit organization providing support groups for people with depression or bipolar disorder as well as their friends and family. DBSA's scope, also includes outreach, education and advocacy regarding depression and bipolar disorder.[1] DBSA employs a small staff and operates with the guidance of a Scientific Advisory Board.[2]

DBSA sponsors online[3] and "face to face"[4] support groups. A nonrandomized study found participants in such groups reported their coping skills, medication compliance, and acceptance of their illness correlated with participation. Member hospitalization decreased by 49% (from 82% to 33%).[5] Following an initial meeting, members were found to be 6.8 times more likely to attend subsequent meetings if accompanied by a member the first time.[6]

DBSA is a not-for-profit 501(c)(3) organization that answers more than 3,000 calls per month on their toll-free information and referral line and receives over 21 million hits per year on their combined websites. Each month, DBSA distributes nearly 20,000 educational materials free of charge to anyone requesting information about mood disorders. DBSA reaches nearly five million people through their educational materials and programs, exhibit materials, and media activities.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance (2008-01-22). "About DBSA". Archived from the original on 2009-03-19. Retrieved 2008-09-18. 
  2. ^ Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance (2008-04-27). "2007 Scientific Advisory Board". Archived from the original on 2009-03-19. Retrieved 2008-09-18. 
  3. ^ Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance. "Online Support Group Entrance". Archived from the original on 2009-03-21. Retrieved 2008-09-18. 
  4. ^ Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance. "Find a support group". Archived from the original on 2009-03-21. Retrieved 2008-09-18. 
  5. ^ Kurtz, Linda F. (1988). "Mutual aid for affective disorders: the manic depressive and depressive association". American Journal of Orthopsychiatry 58 (1): 152–155. doi:10.1111/j.1939-0025.1988.tb01576.x. ISSN 0002-9432. PMID 3344801. 
  6. ^ Powell, Thomas J.; Hill, Elizabeth M.; Warner, Lynn; Yeaton, Willian; Silk, Kenneth R. (2000). "Encouraging People With Mood Disorders to Attend a Self-Help Group". Journal of Applied Social Psychology 20 (11): 2270–2288. doi:10.1111/j.1559-1816.2000.tb02436.x. ISSN 0021-9029. 

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