Depsang Plains

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Depsang Plains is located in Jammu and Kashmir
Depsang Plains
Depsang Plains (Jammu and Kashmir)

The Depsang Plains are located at the Line of Actual Control that separates the Indian- and Chinese-controlled regions.[1][2] The Chinese Army occupied most of the plains in 1962.[2] India controls the western portion of the plains, whereas the eastern portion is part of the Aksai Chin region, which is controlled by China and claimed by India.[3] In April 2013, the Chinese PLA troops set up a temporary camp in the Depsang Bulge, but later withdrew as a result of a diplomatic agreement with India.[4][5][6][7][8][9]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Ladakh incursion: India turns to diplomacy to counter belligerent China amid border stand-off : North, News - India Today". Indiatoday.intoday.in. 2013-04-25. Retrieved 2014-03-15. 
  2. ^ a b Manoj Joshi (2013-05-07). "Making sense of the Depsang incursion". The Hindu. Retrieved 2014-03-15. 
  3. ^ "Khurshid to visit China on May 9, no date for flag meet". Hindustan Times. 2013-04-25. Retrieved 2014-03-15. 
  4. ^ "Chinese incursion 19km, but 750 sq km at stake for India - The Times of India". Articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com. 2013-05-02. Retrieved 2014-03-15. 
  5. ^ "Deadlock ends in Ladakh as Chinese troops pull back after 21-day stand off | Mail Online". Dailymail.co.uk. 2013-05-06. Retrieved 2014-03-15. 
  6. ^ "China puts pre-conditions to pull back, wants India to give up its posts". Indian Express. 2013-04-24. Retrieved 2014-03-15. 
  7. ^ "Depsang Bulge incursion accidental, Chinese military thinktank says - The Times of India". Articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com. 2013-07-15. Retrieved 2014-03-15. 
  8. ^ http://www.firstpost.com/india/chinas-ladakh-intrusion-two-maps-tell-this-dangerous-story-738131.html
  9. ^ "Let's shake hands: 20 days on, China withdraws troops from Ladakh : India, News - India Today". Indiatoday.intoday.in. 2013-05-05. Retrieved 2014-03-15.