Derek MacKenzie

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Derek MacKenzie
Derek MacKenzie 2013-11-01.JPG
Born (1981-06-11) June 11, 1981 (age 33)
Sudbury, ON, CAN
Height 5 ft 11 in (180 cm)
Weight 180 lb (82 kg; 12 st 12 lb)
Position Centre
Shoots Left
NHL team
Former teams
Florida Panthers
Atlanta Thrashers
Columbus Blue Jackets
NHL Draft 128th overall, 1999
Atlanta Thrashers
Playing career 2001–present

Derek MacKenzie (born June 11, 1981) is a Canadian professional ice hockey player and an alternate captain for the National Hockey League's Florida Panthers. He was drafted 128th overall by the Atlanta Thrashers in the 1999 NHL Entry Draft, who he made his NHL debut for in 2002. He also played in the American Hockey League (AHL) for Columbus' and Atlanta's farm teams the Syracuse Crunch and Chicago Wolves respectively. While with the Wolves, MacKenzie was part of a Calder Cup championship team in 2002 and also spent time as the team's captain. He set franchise records in career shorthanded goals for both AHL teams. His father, Ken MacKenzie, is the assistant general manager of the Ontario Hockey League's Sudbury Wolves.

Playing career[edit]

Amateur[edit]

MacKenzie began his junior career playing for his hometown Sudbury Wolves of the Ontario Hockey League (OHL). Following his second season, in which he increased his point production from 20 to 87, he was drafted by the Atlanta Thrashers in the fifth round, 128 overall, in the 1999 National Hockey League (NHL) entry draft.[1] In his final season he registered 40 goals and 89 points leading the Wolves in points and finishing sixth in the OHL. He also finished with a face-off winning percent of 67%, winning both the OHL and Canadian Hockey League (CHL) Face-off Awards.[1][2]

Professional[edit]

MacKenzie taking a face-off in a game against Vancouver in 2011

Following his final season with Sudbury he joined the Thrashers' farm team the Chicago Wolves. He registered 13 goals and 25 points.[1] He also made his National Hockey League debut for the Thrashers during the season against the Columbus Blue Jackets on April 12, 2002.[3] By season's end the Wolves finished with 86 points and qualified for the playoffs.[4] In the playoffs MacKenzie helped the Wolves win their first Calder Cup championship.[5] Over the next three seasons MacKenzie played mainly with the Wolves helping them back to the Calder Cup finals in 2005. The following season he was named team captain.[1][5] In the opening minutes of his first home game as captain MacKenzie crashed into the opposing team's net and broke his ankle.[6][7] He returned later in the season and helped the Wolves to the franchises 500 win. In the game MacKenzie scored his third career hat-trick in the 7–3 victory over the Omaha Ak-Sar-Ben Knights.[8][9] He finished the season playing 36 games registering 10 goals and 22 points, while the Wolves finished with 86 points and missed the playoffs for the first time in franchise history.[10][11] MacKenzie spent one more season in the Thrashers system before becoming a free agent. He finished his Thrashers career with 2 assists and 20 penalty minutes (PIMs) in 28 NHL games, and 377 games played, 83 goals, and 184 points for Chicago.[12] He also set a franchise record for shorthanded goals with 21.[5]

In the off-season he was signed by the Blue Jackets to one-year two-way contract.[12] MacKenzie began the season in the minors playing for Syracuse Crunch. He made his Blue Jackets debut on December 10, 2007 against the Anaheim Ducks, he was reassigned to Syracuse the following day.[13] Later in the season he was again re-called and scored his first career NHL goal against Mike Smith in a game versus the Tampa Bay Lightning.[14] At the end of the year Columbus re-signed MacKenzie to a two-year contract.[15] He continued to split time between Columbus and Syracuse until the 2010–11 season. During his time in Syracuse he set the Crunch team record with 11 career shorthanded goals.[5] He established himself as an NHL regular in 2010–11 and finished the season with career highs in goals (9), assists (14), points (23), and plus-minus rating. His +14 was the highest for a forward and third-highest total in Blue Jackets history.[16] After establishing himself MacKenzie became a fixture on the Blue Jackets forth line and an integral part of their penalty kill.[17] The following season he spent the entire year with the Blue Jackets. Towards the end of the season MacKenzie suffered a concussion and missed the final 16 games of the season.[17] He finished with 7 goals and 14 points in a career high 66 games while leading the Blue Jackets with a +4 rating.[16] After passing an off-season physical, due to concussion concerns, Columbus re-signed MacKenzie to a two-year deal.[16][17]

On July 1, 2014, MacKenzie left the Blue Jackets organization and signed a three-year free agent contract with the Florida Panthers.[18]

International play[edit]

Medal record
Competitor for  Canada
World Junior Championships
Bronze 2001 Moscow

Internationally MacKenzie represented Canada at the 2001 World Junior Ice Hockey Championships.[16] He registered a goal and three points in seven games, the point total tied him for ninth on team Canada.[19] He also won 58.1 percent of his face-offs, the eight highest total in the tournament.[20] In group play Canada went 2–1–1 finishing third in Group B.[21] In the playoff round Canada defeated Team USA 2–1, before losing to Finland in a semi-final game. Following the loss Canada played Sweden in the bronze medal game. Canada defeated Sweden 2–1 earning MacKenzie his lone international medal.[22]

Personal[edit]

MacKenzie is married and the couple has two children, a daughter, Reese, and a son, Greyson.[23] His father, Ken MacKenzie, is the assistant general manager of the Sudbury Wolves.[2] Mackenzie is also good friends with Nashville Predators forward Mike Fisher, whom he played with in Sudbury.[24][25]

Career statistics[edit]

MacKenzie with the Blue Jackets in 2011
Regular season Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1997–98 Sudbury Wolves OHL 59 9 11 20 26 10 0 1 1 6
1998–99 Sudbury Wolves OHL 68 22 65 87 74 4 2 4 6 2
1999–00 Sudbury Wolves OHL 68 24 33 57 110 12 5 9 14 16
2000–01 Sudbury Wolves OHL 62 40 49 89 89 12 6 8 14 16
2001–02 Atlanta Thrashers NHL 1 0 0 0 2
2001–02 Chicago Wolves AHL 68 13 12 25 80 25 4 2 6 20
2002–03 Chicago Wolves AHL 80 14 18 32 97 9 0 0 0 4
2003–04 Chicago Wolves AHL 63 19 16 35 67 10 7 1 8 13
2003–04 Atlanta Thrashers NHL 12 0 1 1 10
2004–05 Chicago Wolves AHL 78 13 20 33 87 18 5 6 11 33
2005–06 Atlanta Thrashers NHL 11 0 1 1 8
2005–06 Chicago Wolves AHL 36 10 12 22 48
2006–07 Chicago Wolves AHL 52 14 23 37 62
2006–07 Atlanta Thrashers NHL 4 0 0 0 0
2007–08 Syracuse Crunch AHL 62 25 24 49 46 13 6 8 14 22
2007–08 Columbus Blue Jackets NHL 17 2 0 2 8
2008–09 Syracuse Crunch AHL 64 22 30 52 50
2008–09 Columbus Blue Jackets NHL 1 0 0 0 2
2009–10 Syracuse Crunch AHL 47 17 30 47 30
2009–10 Columbus Blue Jackets NHL 18 1 3 4 0
2010–11 Columbus Blue Jackets NHL 63 9 14 23 22
2011–12 Columbus Blue Jackets NHL 66 7 7 14 40
2012–13 Columbus Blue Jackets NHL 43 3 5 8 36
2013–14 Columbus Blue Jackets NHL 71 9 9 18 47 6 1 0 1 2
NHL totals 307 31 40 71 175 6 1 0 1 2

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Derek MacKenzie player profile". Hockey Hall of Fame. Retrieved June 13, 2012. 
  2. ^ a b Malinowski, Mark (February 21, 2012). "MacKenzie Finds His Niche in Columbus". National Hockey League. Retrieved June 13, 2012. 
  3. ^ "Blue Jackets Re-Sign Center Derek MacKenzie to a Two-Year, Two-Way NHL-American Hockey League Contract". Columbus Blue Jackets. July 1, 2010. Retrieved June 19, 2012. 
  4. ^ "2001-02 American Hockey League Standings". Internet Hockey Database. Retrieved June 19, 2012. 
  5. ^ a b c d "Alumni Spotlight: Derek MacKenzie". Chicago Wolves. June 22, 2010. Retrieved June 19, 2012. 
  6. ^ Wiebe, Ken. "Moose cap successful first trip". Winnipeg Sun. Canoe Slam. Retrieved June 19, 2012. 
  7. ^ Powers, Scott (October 16, 2005). "Bad break for MacKenzie, Wolves in home opener". Daily Herald. Retrieved June 19, 2012. 
  8. ^ "Wolves win 500th game". The Chicago Tribune. January 19, 2006. Retrieved June 26, 2012. 
  9. ^ "MacKenzie Ignites Wolves 500th Win". Chicago Wolves. Retrieved June 26, 2012. 
  10. ^ "Chicago Wolves all-time standings (IHL)". Internet Hockey Database. Retrieved June 19, 2012. 
  11. ^ "Chicago Wolves all-time standings (AHL)". Internet Hockey Database. Retrieved June 19, 2012. 
  12. ^ a b "Blue Jackets Sign Center Derek MacKenzie, Defenseman Dan Smith". Columbus Blue Jackets. July 11, 2007. Retrieved June 26, 2012. 
  13. ^ "Columbus Blue Jackets Assign Forwards Derek MacKenzie, Joakim Lindstrom to AHL's Syracuse Crunch". Columbus Blue Jackets. December 10, 2007. Retrieved June 26, 2012. 
  14. ^ "Chimera leads Blue Jackets to a 5-3 win over Lightning". USA Today. March 9, 2008. Retrieved June 26, 2012. 
  15. ^ "Columbus Blue Jackets Sign Left Wing Craig MacDonald and Re-Sign Center Derek MacKenzie". Our Sports Central. July 14, 2008. Retrieved June 26, 2012. 
  16. ^ a b c d "Blue Jackets Re-Sign Center Derek MacKenzie To A Two-Year Contract". National Hockey League. May 31, 2012. Retrieved June 13, 2012. 
  17. ^ a b c Portzline, Adam (May 29, 2012). "MacKenzie Deal Done". The Columbus Dispatch. The Dispatch Printing Company. Retrieved June 13, 2012. 
  18. ^ "Derek MacKenzie agrees to three-year contract with the Panthers". Florida Panthers'. 2014-07-01. Retrieved 2014-07-01. 
  19. ^ "2001 IIHF World U20 Championship Team Canada Player Statistics". International Ice Hockey Federation. May 1, 2001. Retrieved June 26, 2012. 
  20. ^ "2001 IIHF World U20 Championship Face-Off Leaders". International Ice Hockey Federation. May 1, 2001. Retrieved June 26, 2012. 
  21. ^ "2001 IIHF World U20 Championship Group B". International Ice Hockey Federation. May 1, 2001. Retrieved June 26, 2012. 
  22. ^ "2001 IIHF World U20 Championship Play Off Round". International Ice Hockey Federation. May 1, 2001. Retrieved June 28, 2012. 
  23. ^ Pascal, Randy (August 11, 2011). "Derek MacKenzie enjoys breakthrough season". Sudbury Sports.com. Retrieved June 13, 2012. 
  24. ^ "Mackenzie Earns Some Job Security". Sudbury Star. Retrieved July 11, 2012. 
  25. ^ Pascal, Randy (February 20, 2011). "Getting to Know Derek MacKenzie". The Hockey News. Retrieved June 13, 2012. 

External links[edit]