Derek Miller

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Derek Miller
DerekMiller.jpg
Background information
Born 1974
Six Nations, Ontario, Canada
Genres Blues
Occupation(s) Guitarist
Singer-songwriter
Instruments Guitar
Years active 2002–present
Labels Arbor Records
Curve Music
Website derekmiller.ca

Derek Miller (born 29 October 1974 in Six Nations, Ontario) is an aboriginal Canadian singer-songwriter. He has received two Juno Awards. He performed at the Closing Ceremonies of the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics with Eva Avila and Nikki Yanofsky.

History[edit]

Miller was born in 1974 in the community of the Six Nations of the Grand River First Nation, Ontario, Canada.[1][2] Miller became interested in music in his teens and by the late 1990s began touring with Buffy Sainte-Marie.[3]

In 2002 Miller released his debut album Music is the Medicine on Winnipeg's Arbor Records.[4] He received a 2003 Juno Award in the category Aboriginal Recording of the Year for "Lovesick Blues" from his album Music is the Medicine.[5][6]

In 2006 Miller released his second album The Dirty Looks.[7][8] Miller was honoured with a 2007 Canadian Aboriginal Music Award, in the category Best Rock Album, for his The Dirty Looks album.[9] The album went on to win Miller a 2008 Juno in the category Aboriginal Recording of the Year.[6][10]

He performed at the Closing Ceremonies of the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics with Eva Avila and Nikki Yanofsky.[11]

In 2010 Miller released his third album Derek Miller with Double Trouble.[12]

Miller has also appeared in supporting acting roles in film and television, including the films Moccasin Flats: Redemption and Point Traverse and the television series Hard Rock Medical.

Discography[edit]

Studio albums[edit]

  • Music is the Medicine (2002)
  • The Dirty Looks (2006)
  • Derek Miller with Double Trouble (2010)

Compilations[edit]

  • Derek Miller Live (DVD) (2008)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Derek Miller Artist Page". radio3.cbc.ca. CBC Radio 3. Retrieved 1 December 2011. 
  2. ^ "Derek Miller Bio". derekmiller.ca. Derek Miller Enterprises. Retrieved 1 December 2011. 
  3. ^ Collar, Matt. "Derek Miller Biography". www.allmusic.com. Allmusic. Retrieved 1 December 2011. 
  4. ^ "Music is the medicine" (sound recording) / Derek Miller, www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/lac-bac/search/all (Ottawa: Library and Archives Canada), OCLC 53977636, AMICUS No. 28408726, retrieved 1 December 2011. 
  5. ^ "Juno nominee Cheechoo born with music". Wawatay News 30 (8) (Wawatay Native Communications Society). wawataynews.ca. 1 May 2003. ISSN 0703-9387. OCLC 3951241. Retrieved 2 January 2011. 
  6. ^ a b "Juno Awards Database". junoawards.ca/database/. Canadian Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. Retrieved 1 December 2011. 
  7. ^ "The dirty looks" (sound recording), www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/lac-bac/search/all (Ottawa: Library and Archives Canada), OCLC 219734593, AMICUS No. 32835138, retrieved 1 December 2011. 
  8. ^ Bryson, Scott (9 November 2006). "http://www.chartattack.com/news/42388/derek-miller-channels-hunter-thompson-for-his-dirty-looks". Chart (Toronto: Chart Communications). chartattack.com. ISSN 1198-7235. Retrieved 1 December 2011. 
  9. ^ "2007 Canadian Aboriginal Music Awards Winners". canab.com. Indian Art-I-Crafts of Ontario. 2007. Retrieved 1 December 2011. 
  10. ^ CanWest News Service (6 April 2008). "Feist an early Juno winner » Hometown girl Feist began what could be a Juno sweep Saturday, when she took home two top prizes at the non-televised Juno Awards in Calgary.". The Vancouver Sun (Postmedia Network Inc.). vancouversun.com. ISSN 0832-1299. Retrieved 2 January 2011. 
  11. ^ Ditzian, Eric (1 March 2010). "Winter Olympics Closing Ceremony Features Neil Young, Michael Buble". mtv.com. MTV. Retrieved 2 January 2011. 
  12. ^ "Derek Miller with Double Trouble" (sound recording), www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/lac-bac/search/all (Ottawa: Library and Archives Canada), AMICUS No. 38936251, retrieved 1 December 2011. 

External links[edit]