Derek Warwick

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Derek Warwick
Derek Warwick 1982.jpg
Warwick at the 1982 Dutch Grand Prix
Born (1954-08-27) 27 August 1954 (age 60)
Formula One World Championship career
Nationality United Kingdom British
Active years 19811990, 1993
Teams Toleman, Renault, Brabham, Arrows, Lotus, Footwork
Races 162 (147 starts)[1]
Championships 0
Wins 0
Podiums 4
Career points 71
Pole positions 0
Fastest laps 2
First race 1981 San Marino Grand Prix
Last race 1993 Australian Grand Prix
British Formula One Series career
Active years 1979
Races 1
Championships 0
Wins 0
Podium finishes 1
Career points 6
Pole positions 0
Fastest laps 0

Derek Stanley Arthur Warwick (born 27 August 1954) is a British former racing driver from England, who lives in Jersey.[2] He raced for many years in Formula One, but never won a Grand Prix. In 2005 and 2006 he raced in the inaugural season of the Grand Prix Masters formula for retired Formula One drivers. He has served as the fourth steward for three Grands Prix in 2010 and 2011. He is president of the British Racing Drivers Club, succeeding Damon Hill.

Early life and career[edit]

Warwick was born in Alresford, Hampshire, England.[3] He began his career in British stock car racing under the Spedeworth organisation at tracks such as his local Aldershot Stadium. He won the Superstox English Championship in 1971 (at the age of 16) and the World Championship at Wimbledon Stadium in 1973.[4] His younger brother Paul also raced with some success in Superstox before progressing to Formula 3000, in which he was racing when killed in an accident in 1991.

Derek won the 1978 British Formula Three Championship.

Derek Warick's Superstox car, Matchams Park, 1973

Formula One (1981–1993)[edit]

Warwick qualified third for Renault at the 1984 Dallas Grand Prix, but spun off after 10 laps.

Warwick began his Formula One career with the fledgling F1 team Toleman for the 1981 season. He managed to qualify for only one race that year, the season finale at Las Vegas.[3] Warwick had mainly dismal 1982 and 1983 seasons in the Toleman car, but bounced back, scoring points in the final four rounds of the 1983 championship.[1]

He joined Renault in 1984 after Alain Prost left them at the end of 1983. Warwick, expecting to have a race-winning car, led the Brazilian Grand Prix, his first drive for them, only to retire because of a suspension failure caused by an early race wheel banging duel with the McLaren of Niki Lauda. He finished in second place in both the Belgian and British Grands Prix in 1984 and placed seventh in the championship.[5] 1984 would prove to be the beginning of the end for the factory Renault team, the pioneers of turbocharging in Formula One. Neither Warwick nor new team mate Patrick Tambay won a race in 1984, the first time since 1978 that the team did not win a Grand Prix.

The turning point in Warwick's career was his decision to stay at Renault for 1985 and reject an offer to drive for Williams-Honda. (The seat was then offered to Nigel Mansell who, accepting the position, went on to win two races at the end of the season.) 1985 was a poor one for Renault and the team withdrew from Formula One at the end of the year. Renault's withdrawal, and Ayrton Senna's refusal to let Warwick join him as team mate at Lotus (using his contracted number one driver status in the team, Senna refused to have anyone but a pure #2 as his team mate as he believed Lotus were not capable of supporting two championship contending drivers), left Warwick without a team for the 1986 season and he took up an offer to drive for Tom Walkinshaw's TWR Jaguar team in the World Sportscar Championship. Following the death of Elio de Angelis in a testing accident in May, however, Warwick was invited to take his place at Brabham. Unconfirmed rumours surfaced that Brabham owner Bernie Ecclestone had invited Warwick to take de Angelis' place as the Englishman was the only available top driver who had not actually contacted the team offering his services in the days following the Italian's untimely death. Warwick explained:

"I got a phone call from Bernie, who said that he really appreciated the fact that I didn’t call him five minutes after Elio had died and would I like to drive for him."[4]

As no Grands Prix clashed with his Sportscar commitments, Warwick was able to race in both world championships.

In 1987, Warwick moved to the Arrows team alongside his Jaguar team mate Eddie Cheever, ending the season with 3 points scored. The 1988 season saw an improvement on the Arrows performance due to the powerful Megatron (a re-badged BMW M12) engine and Warwick finished 7 times in the top 6, earning him 17 points and a respectable 8th position in the championship. His best race of the season was 4th in the Italian Grand Prix at Monza where he finished only half a second behind Cheever. Italy was also notable in that it was the first time since the beginning of 1987 that Arrows engine guru Heini Mader finally solved the problem with the FIA's mandatory pop-off valve which restricted turbo boost. For the first time this allowed both Warwick and Cheever to fully exploit the power of the 640 bhp (477 kW; 649 PS) Megatron engine (restricted to 2.5 BAR boost in 1988) and be much closer to the front than they had been previously.

In 1989, victory eluded Warwick in two occasions. The first was in the Brazilian Grand Prix, when a disastrous pit-stop cost him more than the 17 seconds he finished behind winner Nigel Mansell. But the real heartbreak came in the Canadian Grand Prix, when Warwick drove superbly and was leading the wet race, only to have his Cosworth engine fail on lap 40 while in second place (Ayrton Senna, who had passed Warwick for the lead on lap 38, would himself retire when his McLaren's Honda V10 blew 3 laps from the finish. As Warwick was lapping much quicker than those behind him, including eventual winner Thierry Boutsen, its possible he could have scored his first Grand Prix win had he finished). Reliability issues plagued Warwick's season and cost him good finishes in other races as well, resulting in only 7 points for the season, the last of his 3 years at Arrows.

For the 1990 season, 4 years after Senna's veto, Warwick finally drove for Lotus who in 1990 would be using the Lamborghini V12 engine. But the glory days of that team were over and Warwick ended the season with a meagre 3 points tally. His greatest achievement of the season happened at the 1990 Spanish Grand Prix where his team mate Martin Donnelly suffered a severe crash leaving Warwick to help morale at the team by qualifying in the top 10 only for the gearbox to fail 10 laps from the end. Following a 3 year sabbatical, Warwick returned to Formula One in 1993 to drive for Footwork, but managed to score only 4 points. He ended his career with a total of 71 Grand Prix points.[3]

Some consider Derek Warwick to be the best Formula One driver never to win a single race.[1]

Sports and Touring cars[edit]

Warwick driving for Vauxhall in the 1998 British Touring Car Championship.

Warwick also competed successfully in sports car racing, winning the World Sportscar Championship in 1992, and was part of the Peugeot team which was victorious at the 24 hours of Le Mans race that year. He drove sports cars for Jaguar in 1986 and 1991.

Warwick raced in the British Touring Car Championship (BTCC) after retiring from Formula One, driving for the Alfa Romeo works team in 1995. Despite the team's dominating the previous year, their car was underdeveloped this time, leading to a poor season. In the first race of the season he memorably crashed into a TV camera, an incident featured in the highlights screened by the BBC a week later, with commentator Murray Walker quipping that Warwick owed them £6,000 for the damage ("that'll be six grand please, Derek!"). After a year out of racing, he co-founded the 888 Racing team that took over the running of the works Vauxhall 1997 BTCC entry, as well as owning three car dealerships in Southampton and Jersey. Originally set to be team principal, it was decided he would drive one of the cars alongside established Vauxhall driver John Cleland, winning a wet race at Knockhill in 1998. He retired from racing at the end of the year, but continued his involvement in the team for another 3 years.

Warwick now writes his F1 blog on the Sports social network champions365.com and operates a Honda franchise in Jersey.[6]


Later Life[edit]

n 2005 and 2006 Warwick raced in the inaugural season of the Grand Prix Masters formula for retired Formula One drivers. In 2010, he served as the fourth steward for the Spanish and Hungarian Grands Prix. In 2011, Warwick served as the fourth steward for the 2011 Turkish Grand Prix. This role is given only to former racing drivers, who advise the stewards panel on incidents from a driver perspective. He is president of the British Racing Drivers Club, succeeding Damon Hill.

Racing record[edit]

Complete Formula One results[edit]

(key)

Year Entrant Chassis Engine 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 WDC Points
1981 Candy Toleman
Motorsport
Toleman TG181 Hart 415T 1.5 L4t USW BRA ARG SMR
DNQ
BEL
DNQ
MON
DNPQ
ESP
DNQ
FRA
DNQ
GBR
DNQ
GER
DNQ
AUT
DNQ
NED
DNQ
ITA
DNQ
CAN
DNQ
CPL
Ret
NC 0
1982 Candy Toleman
Motorsport
Toleman TG181C Hart 415T 1.5 L4t RSA
Ret
BRA
DNQ
USW
DNPQ
SMR
Ret
BEL
Ret
MON
DNQ
DET CAN NED
Ret
GBR
Ret
FRA
15
GER
10
AUT
Ret
SUI
Ret
NC 0
Toleman TG183 ITA
Ret
CPL
Ret
1983 Candy Toleman
Motorsport
Toleman TG183B Hart 415T 1.5 L4t BRA
8
USW
Ret
FRA
Ret
SMR
Ret
MON
Ret
BEL
7
DET
Ret
CAN
Ret
GBR
Ret
GER
Ret
AUT
Ret
NED
4
ITA
6
EUR
5
RSA
4
14th 9
1984 Equipe
Renault
Elf
Renault RE50 Renault EF4 1.5 V6t BRA
Ret
RSA
3
BEL
2
SMR
4
FRA
Ret
MON
Ret
CAN
Ret
DET
Ret
DAL
Ret
GBR
2
GER
3
AUT
Ret
NED
Ret
ITA
Ret
EUR
11
POR
Ret
7th 23
1985 Equipe
Renault
Elf
Renault RE60 Renault EF4B 1.5 V6t BRA
10
POR
7
SMR
10
MON
5
CAN
Ret
DET
Ret
FRA
7
14th 5
Renault RE60B Renault EF15 1.5 V6t GBR
5
GER
Ret
AUT
Ret
NED
Ret
ITA
Ret
BEL
6
EUR
Ret
RSA AUS
Ret
1986 Motor Racing
Developments
Brabham BT55 BMW M12/13/1 1.5 L4t BRA ESP SMR MON BEL CAN
Ret
DET
10
FRA
9
GBR
8
GER
7
HUN
Ret
AUT
DNS
ITA
Ret
POR
Ret
MEX
Ret
AUS
Ret
NC 0
1987 USF&G Arrows
Megatron
Arrows A10 Megatron M12/13 1.5 L4t BRA
Ret
SMR
11
BEL
Ret
MON
Ret
DET
Ret
FRA
Ret
GBR
5
GER
Ret
HUN
6
AUT
Ret
ITA
Ret
POR
13
ESP
10
MEX
Ret
JPN
10
AUS
Ret
16th 3
1988 USF&G Arrows
Megatron
Arrows A10B Megatron M12/13 1.5 L4t BRA
4
SMR
9
MON
4
MEX
5
CAN
7
DET
Ret
FRA
Ret
GBR
6
GER
7
HUN
Ret
BEL
5
ITA
4
POR
4
ESP
Ret
JPN
Ret
AUS
Ret
8th 17
1989 USF&G Arrows Arrows A11 Ford Cosworth DFR 3.5 V8 BRA
5
SMR
5
MON
Ret
MEX
Ret
USA
Ret
CAN
Ret
FRA GBR
9
GER
6
HUN
10
BEL
6
ITA
Ret
POR
Ret
ESP
9
JPN
6
AUS
Ret
10th 7
1990 Camel
Team Lotus
Lotus 102 Lamborghini 3512 3.5 V12 USA
Ret
BRA
Ret
SMR
7
MON
Ret
CAN
6
MEX
10
FRA
11
GBR
Ret
GER
8
HUN
5
BEL
11
ITA
Ret
POR
Ret
ESP
Ret
JPN
Ret
AUS
Ret
14th 3
1993 Footwork
Mugen-Honda
Footwork FA13B Mugen-Honda MF-351 HB 3.5 V10 RSA
7
BRA
9
16th 4
Footwork FA14 EUR
Ret
SMR
Ret
ESP
13
MON
Ret
CAN
16
FRA
13
GBR
6
GER
17
HUN
4
BEL
Ret
ITA
Ret
POR
15
JPN
14
AUS
10

Driver did not finish the Grand Prix, but was classified as he completed over 90% of the race distance.

24 Hours of Le Mans results[edit]

Year Team Co-Drivers Car Class Laps Pos. Class
Pos.
1983 Germany Porsche Kremer Racing France Patrick Gaillard
Germany Frank Jelinski
Porsche-Kremer CK5 C 76 DNF DNF
1986 United Kingdom Silk Cut Jaguar
United Kingdom Tom Walkinshaw Racing
United States Eddie Cheever
France Jean-Louis Schlesser
Jaguar XJR-6 C1 239 DNF DNF
1991 United Kingdom Silk Cut Jaguar
United Kingdom Tom Walkinshaw Racing
Denmark John Nielsen
United Kingdom Andy Wallace
Jaguar XJR-12 C2 356 4th 4th
1992 France Peugeot Talbot Sport France Yannick Dalmas
United Kingdom Mark Blundell
Peugeot 905 Evo 1B C1 352 1st 1st
1996 France Courage Compétition United States Mario Andretti
Netherlands Jan Lammers
Courage C36-Porsche LMP1 315 13th 3rd

Complete British Touring Car Championship results[edit]

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position – 1 point awarded 1996 onwards all races) (Races in italics indicate fastest lap) (* signifies that driver lead feature race for at least one lap – 1 point awarded in 1998 only)

Year Team Car 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 Pos Pts
1995 Alfa Romeo Old Spice Racing Alfa Romeo 155 TS DON
1

Ret
DON
2

Ret
BRH
1

12
BRH
2

Ret
THR
1

12
THR
2

Ret
SIL
1

16
SIL
2

17
OUL
1

DNS
OUL
2

DNS
BRH
1

8
BRH
2

11
DON
1

13
DON
2

Ret
SIL
1

9
KNO
1

Ret
KNO
2

16
BRH
1

8
BRH
2

14
SNE
1

Ret
SNE
2

13
OUL
1

8
OUL
2

Ret
SIL
1

8
SIL
2

10
19th 15
1997 Vauxhall Sport Vauxhall Vectra DON
1

9
DON
2

8
SIL
1

8
SIL
2

5
THR
1

15
THR
2

6
BRH
1

10
BRH
2

11
OUL
1

11
OUL
2

Ret
DON
1

Ret
DON
2

10
CRO
1

7
CRO
2

10
KNO
1

9
KNO
2

13
SNE
1

11
SNE
2

Ret
THR
1

9
THR
2

8
BRH
1

Ret
BRH
2

Ret
SIL
1

Ret
SIL
2

Ret
14th 33
1998 Vauxhall Sport Vauxhall Vectra THR
1

12
THR
2

5
SIL
1

4
SIL
2

6*
DON
1

13
DON
2

8
BRH
1

11
BRH
2

13
OUL
1

11
OUL
2

Ret
DON
1

DSQ
DON
2

3
CRO
1

9
CRO
2

12
SNE
1

10
SNE
2

Ret
THR
1

7
THR
2

Ret
KNO
1

9
KNO
2

1
BRH
1

Ret
BRH
2

14
OUL
1

10
OUL
2

5*
SIL
1

7
SIL
2

10
9th 70

Complete Porsche Supercup results[edit]

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position) (Races in italics indicate fastest lap)

Year Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 DC Points
2007 Porsche AG BHR1 BHR2 ESP MON FRA GBR
27
GER HUN TUR BEL ITA NC† 0†

† Not eligible for points due to being a guest driver.

Helmet[edit]

Warwick's helmet is blue with the entire chin area white and a white stripe running across the top, in the chin area there is a stripe on each side, his name written and a Union Jack.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Catania, Maximiliano (22 February 2005). "Derek Warwick in focus". Funo!. Retrieved 22 March 2008. 
  2. ^ A Message from Derek Warwick
  3. ^ a b c "DRIVERS: DEREK WARWICK". GrandPrix.com. Retrieved 22 March 2008. 
  4. ^ a b "EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW: Derek Warwick". Richard's F1. Retrieved 26 August 2011. 
  5. ^ "Renault Rockets – A history of Renault in F1". F1Network.net. Retrieved 22 March 2008. 
  6. ^ http://www.jersey-honda.co.uk/showroom/

External links[edit]

Derek Warwick's F1 Blog on Champions365.com

Sporting positions
Preceded by
Stephen South
British Formula Three Championship
BRDC Series Champion

1978
Succeeded by
Chico Serra
(Combined championship)
Preceded by
Teo Fabi
World Sportscar Champion
1992 with:
Yannick Dalmas
Succeeded by
none
Preceded by
Volker Weidler
Johnny Herbert
Bertrand Gachot
Winner of the 24 Hours of Le Mans
1992 with:
Yannick Dalmas
Mark Blundell
Succeeded by
Geoff Brabham
Christophe Bouchut
Eric Hélary
Preceded by
Damon Hill
BRDC President
2011 – present
Incumbent
Awards
Preceded by
John Watson
Hawthorn Memorial Trophy
1984
Succeeded by
Nigel Mansell
Preceded by
Nigel Mansell
Hawthorn Memorial Trophy
1988
Succeeded by
Nigel Mansell
Preceded by
Nigel Mansell
Autosport
British Competition Driver of the Year

1992
Succeeded by
Damon Hill