Deric Ruttan

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Deric Ruttan
Deric Ruttan at BSOMF.jpg
Ruttan performing at the 2012 Burlington's Sound of Music Festival
Background information
Born (1972-01-27) January 27, 1972 (age 42)
Origin Bracebridge, Ontario, Canada
Genres Country
Occupations singer/songwriter
Instruments Vocals, guitar, harmonica, drums
Years active 2003–present
Labels Lyric Street
On Ramp
Black T
Associated acts Dierks Bentley, Eric Church, Doc Walker
Website dericruttan.net

Deric J. Ruttan (born January 27, 1972) is a Canadian country music artist from Bracebridge, Ontario. Signed to Lyric Street Records in 2003, he made his chart debut on the U.S. and Canadian country music charts that year with the release of his single "When You Come Around". His self-titled debut album was released that year, producing a total of five singles on the Canadian country music charts. A second album, titled First Time in a Long Time, was released in April 2008.

Breakthrough[edit]

Deric moved to Nashville in 1994 to pursue his music career, spending his days writing songs and his nights scouring the city getting ideas and learning from local singer/songwriters. He got his break in 1999 when producer Steve Bogard heard one of Deric's tapes and liked it. Steve signed Deric to a songwriting deal and immediately began recording his first demos. After Doug Howard at Lyric Street Records heard his demo and Deric played five songs live for Randy Goodman, Deric scored a record deal with the label. In 2003, he released his debut album, Deric Ruttan.[1]

In 2003, just as his first single [When You Come Around was released, he celebrated his first No. 1 as a songwriter when friend and collaborator Dierks Bentley took the Ruttan/Bentley/Brett Beavers co-write "What Was I Thinkin'" to the top of the charts in the US. The song helped set Bentley on the path to country stardom. (To date, Bentley has recorded six Ruttan co-writes, including the 2005 chart-topper Lot of Leavin' Left To Do.) In 2004 Ruttan's "My Way", recorded by Aaron Pritchett, was the most-played Canadian country song of that year. Capitol Nashville's Eric Church had an American Billboard hit with his and Ruttan's "Guys Like Me" in 2007, and cuts on other acts followed (over two dozen to-date), on artists like Gary Allan, Paul Brandt, Doc Walker, Jason Blaine, and The Higgins.[2]

In September 2007, Ruttan was awarded his first Canadian Country Music Award (CCMA) for Songwriter Of The Year (along with co-writers Aaron Pritchett and Mitch Merrett), for "Hold My Beer", recorded by Pritchett.[3]

"It wasn't just that writing songs for other artists was taking time away from me writing my next record", says Ruttan. "It was that suddenly I was known as a guy who'd written radio hits for other acts – the bar had been raised for me, creatively, because of that. I felt the next record I made needed to be really, really good."[4]

It took over four years for Ruttan to follow up his 2003 self-titled release. In 2008 he released his second album, aptly titled First Time In A Long Time, which yielded four hit radio singles at Canadian country radio; the title track "Lovin' You Is Killin' Me", "California Plates" (co-written with members of Manitoba country band Doc Walker), and "Good Time", a duet with Ruttan's friend and collaborator Dierks Bentley. (The video for "Good Time" reached No. 1 on CMT Canada's video countdown).[3]

At the Canadian Country Music Awards that September, Ruttan earned a total of four nominations – "Male Artist", "Songwriter", "Record Producer", and "Best Album," and closed the show performing alongside The Guess Who/Bachman Turner Overdrive guitar legend Randy Bachman. By the following year, "First Time In A Long Time" had garnered so much radio airplay that it earned Ruttan and co-writer Jimmy Rankin a SOCAN Country Music Award at the 2009 SOCAN Awards in Toronto.[3]

Songwriting[edit]

Outside of writing for his own albums, Ruttan has co-written songs for many artist including; "What Was I Thinkin'" and "Lot of Leavin' Left to Do" by Dierks Bentley, "Hold My Beer" and "My Way" by Aaron Pritchett, "Guys Like Me" and "Hell on the Heart" by Eric Church, "Promise Broken" by Gary Allan, "Shotgun Girl" by The JaneDear Girls, and many more.

Discography[edit]

Studio albums[edit]

Title Details
Deric Ruttan
First Time in a Long Time
Sunshine
  • Release date: January 12, 2010
  • Label: Black T Records
Take the Week Off
  • Release date: October 15, 2013
  • Label: Black T Records

Live albums[edit]

Title Details
Up All Night – Deric Ruttan Live
  • Release date: September 20, 2011[5]
  • Label: Black T Records

Singles[edit]

2000s[edit]

Year Single Peak chart
positions
Album
CAN
[6]
US Country
[7]
2003 "When You Come Around" 46 Deric Ruttan
"Unbeatable"
2004 "I Saved Everything"
2005 "Take the Wheel"
"Shine"
2006 "Invisible"
2007 "Good Time" (with Dierks Bentley) First Time in a Long Time
2008 "First Time in a Long Time" 96
"Lovin' You Is Killin' Me"
2009 "California Plates"
"Almost Beautiful"
"Sing That Song Again" Sunshine
"—" denotes releases that did not chart

2010s[edit]

Year Single Peak chart
positions
Album
CAN Country
[8]
CAN
[6]
2010 "Up All Night" 91 Sunshine
"That's How I Wanna Go Out" 87
2011 "Sunshine (Hey Little Girl)"
"She's Like a Song" Up All Night – Deric Ruttan Live
2012 "Main Street, 1979"
"My Kind of Freedom"
2013 "Where the Train Don't Stop" 11
"Take the Week Off" 10 66 Take the Week Off
2014 "Pass It Around" 17
"Country Mile"A
"—" denotes releases that did not chart
  • ACurrent single.

Music videos[edit]

Year Video Director
2003 "When You Come Around"[9] Trey Fanjoy
"Unbeatable"
2005 "Take the Wheel"
"Love Did"
2007 "Good Time" (with Dierks Bentley) Antonio Hrynchuk
2008 "First Time in a Long Time"
"Lovin' You Is Killin' Me" Joel Stewart
2009 "California Plates"
2010 "That's How I Wanna Go Out" Warren P. Sonoda
2011 "Sunshine (Hey Little Girl)"
2012 "Main Street, 1979" Jeth Weinrich
"My Kind of Freedom" John Fucile/Lisa Fucile/Deric Ruttan
2013 "Take the Week Off" Margaret Malandruccolo
2014 "Pass It Around"

Awards and nominations[edit]

Year Association Category Result
2003 Canadian Country Music Association Chevy Trucks Rising Star Award Nominated
2004 Male Artist of the Year Nominated
Chevy Trucks Rising Star Award Nominated
Album of the Year – Deric Ruttan Nominated
2005 Male Artist of the Year Nominated
2007 SOCAN Songwriter of the Year – "Hold My Beer" Won
2008 Male Artist of the Year Nominated
Album of the Year – First Time in a Long Time Nominated
Songwriter of the Year – "First Time in a Long Time" Nominated
2011 Juno Awards of 2011 Country Album of the YearSunshine Nominated
Canadian Country Music Association Male Artist of the Year Nominated
Single of the Year – "That's How I Wanna Go Out" Nominated
Songwriter of the Year – "That's How I Wanna Go Out" Nominated
CMT Video of the Year – "That's How I Wanna Go Out" Nominated
2012 Songwriter of the Year – "They Don't Make 'Em Like That Anymore" Nominated
Songwriter of the Year – "Main Street, 1979" Nominated
2013 Single of the Year – "Main Street, 1979" Nominated
Songwriter of the Year – "Cool" Nominated
2014 56th Annual Grammy Awards Grammy Award for Best Country Song – "Mine Would Be You" Nominated

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Canadians in Nashville", Words and Music, Fall 2010
  2. ^ work=http://www.dericruttan.net/biography.php
  3. ^ a b c "Deric Ruttan". CA: CMT.ca. Retrieved 2012-04-10. 
  4. ^ http://www.theagencygroup.com/artist.aspx?ArtistID=5377
  5. ^ Rockingham, Graham (September 7, 2011). "Still searching for U.S. respect". The Hamilton Spectator. Retrieved September 14, 2011. 
  6. ^ a b "Deric Ruttan Album & Song Chart History - Billboard Canadian Hot 100". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved November 20, 2013. 
  7. ^ "Deric Ruttan Album & Song Chart History - Country Songs". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved November 20, 2013. 
  8. ^ "Deric Ruttan Album & Song Chart History - Canada Country". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved November 20, 2013. 
  9. ^ "Home Site of Trey Fanjoy - Video Director". Archived from the original on 2010-06-12. Retrieved November 18, 2011. 

External links[edit]