Dermacentor

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Dermacentor
Dermacentor occidentalis -Harmony Headlands State Park, California, USA-8.jpg
Dermacentor occidentalis
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Arachnida
Subclass: Acari
Superorder: Parasitiformes
Order: Ixodida
Family: Ixodidae
Genus: Dermacentor
Koch, 1844 [1]
Type species
Dermacentor reticulatus
(Fabricius, 1794)

Dermacentor is a genus of ticks in the family Ixodidae, the hard ticks. The genus has a cosmopolitan distribution, with native species on all continents except Australia. Most occur in the Nearctic ecozone.[2]

Hosts of Dermacentor ticks include many large and small mammals, including horses, deer, cattle, lagomorphs, peccaries, porcupines, tapirs, desert bighorn sheep, and humans.[2] The American dog tick (D. variabilis) is a member of the genus.[3]

Dermacentor are vectors of many pathogens, including Rickettsia rickettsii, which causes the disease Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Coxiella burnetii, which causes Q fever, Anaplasma marginale, which causes anaplasmosis in cattle, Francisella tularensis, which causes tularemia, Babesia caballi, which causes equine piroplasmosis, and the Flavivirus that causes Powassan encephalitis.[2] Dermacentor ticks inject a neurotoxin that causes tick paralysis.[2]

Species[edit]

As of 2010, there are about 34 species in the genus.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Don R. Arthur (1960). "The genus Dermacentor: 1. General". The genera Dermacentor, Anocentor, Cosmiomma, Boophilus, Margaropus. Ticks 5. Cambridge University Press. pp. 6–37. 
  2. ^ a b c d C. E. Yunker, J. E. Keirans, C. M. Clifford & E. R. Easton (1986). "Dermacentor ticks (Acari: Ixodoidea: Ixodidae) of the New World: a scanning electron microscope atlas" (PDF). Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington 88 (4): 609–627. 
  3. ^ W. Chen & P. E. Kaufman (2008). "American Dog Tick, Dermacentor variabilis (Say) (Arachnida: Ixodida: Ixodidae)". Entomology and Nematology. Florida Cooperative Extension Service. University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. EENY-443. Retrieved December 4, 2013. 
  4. ^ Alberto A. Guglielmone, Richard G. Robbing, Dmitry A. Apanaskevich, Trevor N. Petney, Agustín Estrada-Peña, Ivan G. Horak, Renfu Shao & Stephen C. Barker (2010). "The Argasidae, Ixodidae and Nuttalliellidae (Acari: Ixodida) of the world: a list of valid species names" (PDF). Zootaxa 2528: 1–28. 
  5. ^ Dmitry A. Apanaskevich & Sergio E. Bermúdez (2013). "Description of a new Dermacentor (Acari: Ixodidae) species, a parasite of wild mammals in Central America". Journal of Medical Entomology 50 (6): 1190–1201. doi:10.1603/ME13121. 

External links[edit]