Dermot Barnes-Holmes

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Dermot Barnes-Holmes (born 1936) was Foundation Professor at the Department of Psychology at National University of Ireland, Maynooth. He is known for an analysis of human language and cognition through the development of Relational Frame Theory with Steven C. Hayes, and its application in various psychological settings. He was the world's most prolific author in the experimental analysis of human behaviour between the years 1980 and 1999.[1] He was awarded the Don Hake Basic/Applied Research Award at the 2012 American Psychological Association Conference in Orlando, Florida. He originally conceptualized and programmed the Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure (IRAP) and is currently involved in developing it as part of the Implicit Cognition and Behaviour (ICaB) Research Group in NUI Maynooth.[2]

IRAP[edit]

The Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure (IRAP) [2][3] is an implicit measure similar to the Implicit Association Test (IAT), with the key difference being that it measures specific relations between stimuli rather than general associations. It has its theoretical basis in Relational Frame Theory.[2][4]

Publications (selection)[edit]

Hayes, S. C., Barnes-Holmes, D., & Roche, B. (Eds.). (2001). Relational Frame Theory: A Post-Skinnerian account of human language and cognition. New York: Plenum Press. ISBN 0-306-46600-7


Hayes, S. C., Bond, F. W., Barnes-Holmes, D., Austin, J. (Eds.) (2006). Acceptance and mindfulness at work: Applying acceptance and commitment therapy and relational frame theory to organisational behaviour management. New York: Haworth Press.

Carpenter, K.M., Martinez, D., Vadhan, N.P., Barnes-Holmes, D., Nunes, E.V. (2012). Measures of Attentional Bias and Relational Responding Are Associated with Behavioral Treatment Outcome for Cocaine Dependence. American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse. PMID 22220556

Vahey, N., Boles, S., & Barnes-Holmes, D. (2010). Measuring adolescents’ smoking-related social identity preferences with the Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure (IRAP) for the first time: A starting point that explains later IRAP evolutions. International Journal of Psychology and Psychological Therapy, 10, 453-474.

Dawson, D.L., Barnes-Holmes, D., Gresswell, D.M., Hart, A.J. & Gore, N.J. (2009). Assessing the Implicit Beliefs of Sexual Offenders Using the Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure: A First Study. Sexual Abuse: A Journal of Research and Treatment, 21, 57 - 75.

Blackledge, J. T. & Barnes-Holmes, D. (2009). Core processes in acceptance and commitment therapy. In J. T. Blackledge, J. Ciarrochi, & F. P. Deane (Eds.), Acceptance and commitment therapy: Contemporary theory, research and practice (pp. 41–58). Bowen Hills, QLD, Australia: Australian Academic Press.

Barnes-Holmes, D., Luciano, C., & Barnes-Holmes, Y. (2004). Relational frame theory: Definitions, controversies, and applications I. Special issue of the International Journal of Psychology and Psychological Therapy, 4, 177-394.

Barnes-Holmes, D., Luciano, C., & Barnes-Holmes, Y. (2004). Relational frame theory: Definitions, controversies, and applications II. Special issue of the International Journal of Psychology and Psychological Therapy, 4, 443-622.

Lyddy, F., Barnes-Holmes, D., & Hampson, P. J. (2001). A transfer of sequence function via equivalence in a connectionist network. The Psychological Record, 51, 409-428.

Barnes-Holmes, D., Barnes-Holmes, Y., & Cullinan, V. (2000). Relational frame theory and Skinner's Verbal Behavior: A possible synthesis. The Behavior Analyst, 23, 69-84.

Barnes-Holmes, D., Dymond, S., Roche, B., & Grey, I. (1999). Language and cognition. The Psychologist, 12, 500-504.

Gomez, S., Huerta, F., Barnes-Holmes, D., & Luciano, C. (1999). Breaking equivalence relations. Experimental Analysis of Human Behavior Bulletin, 17, 1-4.

Barnes, D. (1997). Conceptual and philosophical issues in behavioral psychology. Special issue of The Psychological Record, 47, 527-660.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Dymond, S. (2002). The next generation: Authorship trends in the experimental analysis of human behavior (1980-1999). Experimental Analysis of Human Behavior Bulletin, 20, 1-7.
  2. ^ a b c IRAP & RFT Research http://IRAPresearch.org
  3. ^ Dawson, D.L., Barnes-Holmes, D., Gresswell, D.M., Hart, A.J. & Gore, N.J. (2009). Assessing the Implicit Beliefs of Sexual Offenders Using the Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure: A First Study Sexual Abuse: A Journal of Research and Treatment, 21, pp. 57 - 75. doi:10.1177/1079063208326928 [1]
  4. ^ Barnes-Holmes, D., Barnes-Holmes, Y., Power, P., Hayden, E., Milne, R., Stewart, I. (2006). Do you really know what you believe? Developing the Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure (IRAP) as a direct measure of implicit beliefs. The Irish Psychologist, 32, 169-177.