Deruluft

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Deruluft
Founded November 24, 1921 (1921-11-24)
Commenced operations May 1, 1922 (1922-05-01)
Ceased operations March 31, 1937 (1937-03-31)
A Deruluft Dornier Merkur at the opening of Stettin Airstrip 1927. Second from left Stockholm Municipal commissioner Yngve Larsson.

Deruluft (Deutsch-Russische Luftverkehrs A.G., or Deruluft) was a joint Soviet-German airline, established on 24 November 1921. Deruluft opened its first service to Moscow from Königsberg (later Kaliningrad) on 1 May 1922. It started a new route from Berlin via Tallinn to Leningrad on 6 June 1928, and maintained both routes until 31 March 1936.

Most of the aircraft used were German, and so was its organization, at least until the 1930s. Its first aircraft were Dutch-built Fokker F.III's. Later German Junkers F13's were added to the fleet. At first, Deruluft carried only mail and officials, but on 27 August 1922 the service was opened to the public. From 1929 onwards the early Fokker F.III's were replaced by Dornier Merkur's. Early 1931 the Tupolev ANT-9 was added. Deruluft was terminated on 31 March 1937.

Fleet[edit]

Accidents and incidents[edit]

  • On 31 January 1935, a Junkers Ju-52/3mge (D-AREN) crashed into a hill in rain and fog near Stettin, Germany (now Szczecin, Poland) en route to Berlin from Moscow, killing all 11 on board.[1]
  • On 7 March 1935, a Rohrbach Roland (D-AJYP) crashed at Schievelbein, Germany due to structural failure, killing three.[2]
  • On 6 December 1936, a Tupolev ANT-9 (CCCP-D311) crashed near Moscow due to pilot error, killing nine of 14 on board.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Accident description for D-AREN at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 15 December 2012.
  2. ^ "D-AJYP accident description". Retrieved 5 December 2013. 
  3. ^ "CCCP-D311 accident description". Retrieved 5 December 2013. 

R.E.G. Davies, Aeroflot: An Illustrated History of the World's Largest Airline, 1992.

External links[edit]