Detroit Athletic Club

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Detroit Athletic Club
DetroitAthleticClubnew.JPG
General information
Type private club
Architectural style Neo-Renaissance style
Location 241 Madison Street
Detroit, Michigan 48226
Coordinates 42°20′15″N 83°02′50″W / 42.337468°N 83.047355°W / 42.337468; -83.047355Coordinates: 42°20′15″N 83°02′50″W / 42.337468°N 83.047355°W / 42.337468; -83.047355
Completed 1915, 2012
Technical details
Floor count 6
Design and construction
Architect Albert Kahn

The Detroit Athletic Club (often referred to as the DAC) is a private social club and athletic club located in the heart of Detroit's theater, sports, and entertainment district. It is located across the street from Detroit's historic Music Hall. The clubhouse was designed by Albert Kahn and inspired by Rome's Palazzo Farnese. It maintains reciprocal agreements for their members at other private clubs worldwide. It contains full-service athletic facilities, pools, restaurants, ballrooms, and guest rooms. Members include businessmen of all types as well as professional athletes. Ty Cobb is among the athletes to have been a member of the DAC. The building is visible beyond center field from Comerica Park.[1]

Over the years, the Detroit Athletic Club has provided financial assistance and training opportunities for a number of amateur athletes preparing for the Olympic Games.

At the 1956 U.S. Olympic Team Trials, springboard divers Jeanne Stunyo (a native of Gary, Indiana) and Mackenzie High School graduate Barbara Gilders-Dudeck were sponsored by the DAC. Stunyo and Gilders-Dudeck qualified for the Summer Olympic Games in Melbourne, Australia. At the Games, Jeanne Stunyo won the springboard diving silver medal, and Barbara Gilders-Dudeck finished in fourth place - less than one point from a bronze medal.[2]

A. Duncan Carse created paintings to decorate the Detroit Athletic Club. The paintings were covered at the club but they were on show again after a remodeling of the club in 1999.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hill, Eric J. and John Gallagher (2002). AIA Detroit: The American Institute of Architects Guide to Detroit Architecture. Wayne State University Press. ISBN 0-8143-3120-3. 
  2. ^ Voyles, Kenneth H. and John Bluth (2001). The Detroit Athletic Club: 1887-2001. Arcadia Publishing. ISBN 0-7385-1901-4. 
  3. ^ Voyles, Kenneth H.; Bluth, John A. (2001). The Detroit Athletic Club, 1887-2001. Chicago, IL: Arcadia Pub. p. 123. ISBN 0738519014. 

Further reading[edit]

  • Hill, Eric J. and John Gallagher (2002). AIA Detroit: The American Institute of Architects Guide to Detroit Architecture. Wayne State University Press. ISBN 0-8143-3120-3. 
  • Meyer, Katherine Mattingly and Martin C.P. McElroy with Introduction by W. Hawkins Ferry, Hon A.I.A. (1980). Detroit Architecture A.I.A. Guide Revised Edition. Wayne State University Press. ISBN 0-8143-1651-4. 
  • Sobocinski, Melanie Grunow (2005). Detroit and Rome: building on the past. Regents of the University of Michigan. ISBN 0-933691-09-2. 
  • Voyles, Kenneth H. and John Bluth (2001). The Detroit Athletic Club: 1887-2001. Arcadia Publishing. ISBN 0-7385-1901-4. 

External links[edit]