Detroit Safari

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Detroit Neon / Safari
DetroitSafari.png
Team history 1994–1997
Arena The Palace of Auburn Hills 1994 - 1997
Based in Auburn Hills, Michigan
Colors
Leagues Continental Indoor Soccer League

The Detroit Safari (originally founded as the Detroit Neon) was a member of the Continental Indoor Soccer League that played at The Palace of Auburn Hills.[1] Their owners, the Palace Sports Group were awarded a franchise on November 4, 1993. Their star player and unofficial coach (the CISL prohibited player-coaches) was experienced indoor player Andy Chapman.[2]

The name Detroit Neon was a reference to the Dodge Neon and came from a sponsorship from the Chrysler Corporation like fellow Palace Sports team the IHL Detroit Vipers. In 1997 the naming rights were sold to General Motors and they were named after the GMC Safari minivan.[3] The team folded along with the closing of the Continental Indoor Soccer League after the 1997 season.[4]

During the team's existence, some games (including all 1997 home games) were televised on PASS Sports. They led the league in attendance in their first season (1994) and never placed below fifth in league attendance for a season. During the five seasons that the Neon/Safari played, their average attendance was 6,232.

Ownership[edit]

Staff[edit]

  • United States Ron Campbell - General Manager (1994–97)

Head coaches[edit]

Former players[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "1997 CISL Preview". Los Angeles Times. June 20, 1997. p. C11. Retrieved January 21, 2013. 
  2. ^ Langdon, Jerry (July 16, 1997). "Detroit Safari hunting for first win of season". USA Today. p. 16C. Retrieved January 21, 2013. 
  3. ^ "Safari Soccer Launches New Relationship With GMC Safari; Unveiling Logo, Team Colors CISL Season to Begin June 13 at The Palace". The Auto Channel. May 28, 1997. Retrieved January 21, 2013. 
  4. ^ "Loss of teams forces CISL to shut down". Fort Worth Star-Telegram (Fort Worth, TX: The McClatchy Company). December 24, 1997. p. 10. Retrieved January 21, 2013.