Deva Raya

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For the 2012 film, see Devaraya (film).
Mallikarjuna temple in Hospet, built by Deva Raya I
Kannada inscription of Deva Raya I at the Mallikarjuna temple in Hospet
Vijayanagara Empire
Sangama dynasty
Harihara Raya I 1336–1356
Bukka Raya I 1356–1377
Harihara Raya II 1377–1404
Virupaksha Raya 1404–1405
Bukka Raya II 1405–1406
Deva Raya I 1406–1422
Ramachandra Raya 1422
Vira Vijaya Bukka Raya 1422–1424
Deva Raya II 1424–1446
Mallikarjuna Raya 1446–1465
Virupaksha Raya II 1465–1485
Praudha Raya 1485
Saluva dynasty
Saluva Narasimha Deva Raya 1485–1491
Thimma Bhupala 1491
Narasimha Raya II 1491–1505
Tuluva dynasty
Tuluva Narasa Nayaka 1491–1503
Vira Narasimha Raya 1503–1509
Krishna Deva Raya 1509–1529
Achyuta Deva Raya 1529–1542
Venkata I 1542
Sadasiva Raya 1542–1570
Aravidu dynasty
Aliya Rama Raya 1542–1565
Tirumala Deva Raya 1565–1572
Sriranga I 1572–1586
Venkata II 1586–1614
Sriranga II 1614
Rama Deva Raya 1617–1632
Venkata III 1632–1642
Sriranga III 1642–1646

Deva Raya I (reigned 1406–1422 CE) was an emperor of the Vijayanagara Empire from the Sangama Dynasty. After Harihara II died there was a dispute between his sons for the throne of the Vijayanagara Empire in which Deva Raya I eventually come out as victor. He was a very capable and powerful ruler who became famous for the construction of several irrigation works.[1] He modernized the Vijayanagara army by improving the cavalry and employing Turkic archers.[2] He was described by the Italian traveler Niccolo de Conti as the most powerful king of India.[3]

Irrigation works and administration[edit]

The credit for making the capital city of the Vijayanagara Empire one of the biggest cities in the world of the 15th century goes to Deva Raya I. He realized that water-supply both for drinking and for irrigation was restricting the growth of the capital.[4]In 1410 CE he constructed a barrage across the Tungabhadra river which greatly helped the agriculture. He also got dug an aqueduct 24 kilometers long from the Tungabhadra river to the capital which had been suffering from scarcity of water.[5]

Military campaigns[edit]

Throughout his reign, Deva Raya was continually fighting against the Velamas of Telangana, the Bahmani Sultan of Gulbarga, and the Reddis of Kondavidu and the Gajaptis of Kalinga. Even so, Deva Raya was capable of managing the vast amount of territory that he controlled. Following a confusion in the Reddi kingdom Deva Raya entered into an alliance with Warangal for partitioning the Reddi kingdom between them.[6] The defection of Warangal from the side of the Bahmani Sultanate changed the balance of power in the Deccan. In consequence Deva Raya inflicted a shattering defeat on the Bahmani Sultan Firoz Shah and annexed the centre territory up to the mouth of the Krishna river and captured Panugal.[7][8]

Like his grandfather Harihara I, Deva Raya I patronised the Jain Kannada poet Madhura. During his rule, a dispute over property between the Shanka Jainalya of Gadag district and the Somesvara temple trust within the palace was settled amicably.

An account of Persian writer Ferishta narrates how the king fell in love with a beautiful girl, Pertal from Mudugal in Raichur district, with the relationship leading to a war with the Bahmani Sultan and the eventual defeat of Deva Raya I, the Sultan marrying Deva Raya's daughter and getting Pertal married to his son Hasan Khan.

After his death, Deva Raya was to be succeeded by his sons Ramachandra Raya and Vijaya Raya.

European traveller Nicolo Conti travelled to Vijayanagara during this time and described the city being 60 miles in diameter.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mediaeval Deccan History: Commemoration Volume in Honour of Purshottam by A. Rā Kulakarṇī,M. A. Nayeem,Teotonio R. De Souza p.106
  2. ^ Columbia Chronologies of Asian History and Culture by John Stewart Bowman p.271
  3. ^ Columbia Chronologies of Asian History and Culture by John Stewart Bowman p.271
  4. ^ Mediaeval Deccan History: Commemoration Volume in Honour of Purshottam by A. Rā Kulakarṇī,M. A. Nayeem,Teotonio R. De Souza p.106
  5. ^ India History by V.K Agnihotri B-150
  6. ^ Medieval India: From Sultanat to the Mughals-Delhi Sultanat by Satish Chandra p.180
  7. ^ Medieval India: From Sultanat to the Mughals-Delhi Sultanat by Satish Chandra p.180
  8. ^ History of Medieval India: From 1000 A.D. to 1707 A.D. by Radhey Shyam Chaurasia p.109
  • Dr. Suryanath U. Kamat, Concise history of Karnataka, MCC, Bangalore, 2001 (Reprinted 2002)
Kannada inscription of Deva Raya I at the Hazara Rama temple in Hampi

External links[edit]


Preceded by
Bukka Raya II
Vijayanagar empire
1406–1422
Succeeded by
Vira Vijaya Bukka Raya