Devern Hansack

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Devern Hansack
Hansack edit.jpg
Pitcher
Born: (1978-02-05) February 5, 1978 (age 36)
Pearl Lagoon, Nicaragua
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
September 23, 2006 for the Boston Red Sox
Last MLB appearance
September 28, 2008 for the Boston Red Sox
Career statistics
Win–loss record 2-2
Earned run average 3.70
Strikeouts 18
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Devern Brandon Hansack (born February 5, 1978) is a Nicaraguan professional baseball pitcher who formerly pitched in Major League Baseball in the United States. He bats and throws right-handed.

Professional career[edit]

Hansack, born in Pearl Lagoon, Nicaragua, Hansack is an Afro-Nicaraguan.[1] He originally signed with the Houston Astros as a non-drafted free agent on October 21, 1999. He spent 5 seasons with the organization before being released on March 29, 2004.[2]

From 2004-2005, he played professionally in the Nicaraguan Professional Baseball League.[3][4]

Hansack came back to Major League Baseball when he signed with the Red Sox on December 9, 2005. He played for the Red Sox Double-A team, the Portland Sea Dogs where he posted an 8–7 record with a 3.26 ERA in 31 games (18 starts). His performance earned him a September call up on September 19, 2006.

He made his Major League debut against the Toronto Blue Jays on September 23, 2006, pitching 513 innings and allowing 3 runs while recording 2 strikeouts and received the loss.

In his next appearance on October 1, 2006, against the Baltimore Orioles in the last game of the season, Hansack pitched a no-hitter for five innings before the remainder of the game was rained out. Because the game was rain-shortened, Hansack did not get the credit for an official no-hitter; however, he did get credit for both a complete game and a shutout. Hansack faced fifteen batters, walking only Fernando Tatís, who was then retired in a double play.[5]

Hansack pitched well in 2007 spring training, compiling a 2.08 ERA in five appearances. He did not make the major league roster and was optioned to Triple-A Pawtucket for the start of the 2007 season. On May 3, 2007, Hansack was called up to the Red Sox to replace Mike Timlin, who was placed on the DL. He was optioned again to Pawtucket on May 11, 2007, when the Red Sox recalled Javier López. On May 18, he was called up to replace Josh Beckett, who had been placed on the 15-day DL.

On May 19, 2007, Hansack pitched the second game of a doubleheader at Fenway Park with the Atlanta Braves. He pitched 4 innings, allowing 6 hits and 4 runs, he struck out 2 and walked 1. He left after the 4th inning due to a bruised finger. The Red Sox lost the game 14–0.[6]

In 2008, he started the year in Triple-A Pawtucket where he had a 6–10 record with a 4.08 ERA. On August 19, 2008, he was placed on the DL after being hit in the forearm with a ball. He was called up to the majors on September 7.

On April 22, 2009 the Boston Red Sox released Hansack unconditionally. Hansack was re-signed as a minor league free agent by the Red Sox on January 25, 2010.[7] In May 2010, the Red Sox released Hansack.[8]

Career highlights[edit]

  • 2006 Eastern League Champion with the Portland Sea Dogs (AA - Boston)
  • 2006 Eastern League Championship MVP
  • 2006 Portland Sea Dogs Pitcher of the Year

References[edit]

  1. ^ Nelson, Amy (February 13, 2007). "From Pearl Lagoon to the Back Bay". ESPN the Magazine. Retrieved 5 April 2013. 
  2. ^ "Devern Hansack:". Baseball Cube. Retrieved 2008-06-08. 
  3. ^ "Devern Hansack: 2006 Biography". MLB.com. Retrieved 2008-06-08. 
  4. ^ "#39 Devern Hansack". Sox Prospects. Retrieved 2008-06-08. 
  5. ^ "Retrosheet Boxscore: Boston Red Sox 9, Baltimore Orioles 0". Retrosheet. 
  6. ^ Alex McPhillips (2007-05-20). "Tables turned in nightcap". MLB.com. Retrieved 2008-06-08. 
  7. ^ Andrews, Mike (2010-01-29). "SoxProspects News: Where did the Sox system free agents sign?". News.soxprospects.com. Retrieved 2014-01-19. 
  8. ^ Matt Eddy (May 20, 2010). "Minor League Transactions". Baseball America. Baseball America Inc. Retrieved May 21, 2010. 

External links[edit]