Devil's Sinkhole State Natural Area

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Devil's Sinkhole State Natural Area
Map showing the location of Devil's Sinkhole State Natural Area
Map showing the location of Devil's Sinkhole State Natural Area
Devil's Sinkhole
Coordinates 30°3′8″N 100°6′12″W / 30.05222°N 100.10333°W / 30.05222; -100.10333Coordinates: 30°3′8″N 100°6′12″W / 30.05222°N 100.10333°W / 30.05222; -100.10333
Area 1,859.7 acres (752.6 ha)
Established 1985
Governing body Texas Parks and Wildlife Department

Devil's Sinkhole State Natural Area is a natural bat habitat near the city of Rocksprings in Edwards County in the U.S. state of Texas. Home to the Mexican free-tailed bat, access to the area is available only through advanced reservations.

History[edit]

The Devil's Sinkhole is a vertical natural bat habitat The 40x60 feet opening drops down to reveal a cavern some 400 feet below. The cavern was first discovered by local residents in 1876. H. S. Barber carved his name inside the cave in 1889.[1] The area was transferred to the state of Texas in 1985, and open to the public in 1992.[2] Carved by water erosion, the cavern is home to several million Mexican free-tailed bats who emerge at sunset during April through October.[3]

Facilities, admission[edit]

Evening Bat Flight tours, summer months only. Guided nature hikes also available.[2]

Wheelchair accessible viewing platform. Picnic areas.[2]

Access restricted to advance tour arrangement. Tours are conducted by The Devil's Sinkhole Society, a local volunteer group that works in conjunction of Texas Parks and Wildlife Department and Bat Conservation International to facilitate visitor education and tours.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Smith, A. Richard. "Devil's Sinkhole discovery". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 11 February 2012. 
  2. ^ a b c "TPWD Devil's Sinkhole". Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. Retrieved 11 February 2012. 
  3. ^ Parent, Laurence (2008). Official Guide to Texas State Parks and Historic Sites: Revised Edition. University of Texas Press. pp. 2, 3. ISBN 978-0-292-71726-8. 
  4. ^ "Tour Information". The Devil's Sinkhole Society. Retrieved 11 February 2012. 

External links[edit]