Dexanabinol

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Dexanabinol
HU-211 structure.png
Systematic (IUPAC) name
(6aS,10aS)-9-(Hydroxymethyl)- 6,6-dimethyl- 3-(2-methyloctan-2-yl)- 6a,7,10,10a-tetrahydrobenzo [c]chromen-1-ol
Clinical data
Legal status
?
Identifiers
CAS number 112924-45-5 YesY
ATC code None
PubChem CID 107778
ChemSpider 96934 N
UNII R6VT8U5372 YesY
Chemical data
Formula C25H38O3 
Mol. mass 386.567 g/mol
 N (what is this?)  (verify)

Dexanabinol (HU-211 or ETS2101[1]) is a synthetic cannabinoid derivative that is the "unnatural" enantiomer of the potent cannabinoid agonist HU-210.[2] Unlike other cannabinoid derivatives, HU-211 does not act as a cannabinoid receptor agonist, but instead has NMDA antagonist effects.[3] It therefore does not produce cannabis-like effects, but is anticonvulsant and neuroprotective, and is widely used in scientific research as well as currently being studied for practical applications such as treatment of head injury or stroke or cancer.[4][5][6] It was shown to be safe in clinical trials[7] and is currently undergoing Phase I trials for the treatment of brain cancer.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ e-therapeutics Clinical Development Pipeline
  2. ^ Pop E (September 2000). "Nonpsychotropic synthetic cannabinoids". Current Pharmaceutical Design 6 (13): 1347–60. doi:10.2174/1381612003399446. PMID 10903397. 
  3. ^ Feigenbaum JJ, et al. (December 1989). "Nonpsychotropic cannabinoid acts as a functional N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor blocker". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 86 (23): 9584–7. doi:10.1073/pnas.86.23.9584. PMC 298542. PMID 2556719. 
  4. ^ Biegon A; Joseph AB (August 1995). "Development of HU-211 as a neuroprotectant for ischemic brain damage". Neurological Research 17 (4): 275–80. PMID 7477742. 
  5. ^ Darlington CL (October 2003). "Dexanabinol: a novel cannabinoid with neuroprotective properties". IDrugs : the Investigational Drugs Journal 6 (10): 976–9. PMID 14534855. 
  6. ^ Vink R; Nimmo AJ (January 2009). "Multifunctional drugs for head injury". Neurotherapeutics : the Journal of the American Society for Experimental NeuroTherapeutics 6 (1): 28–42. doi:10.1016/j.nurt.2008.10.036. PMID 19110197. 
  7. ^ Maas AI, et al. (January 2006). "Efficacy and safety of dexanabinol in severe traumatic brain injury: results of a phase III randomised, placebo-controlled, clinical trial". Lancet Neurol 5 (1): 38–45. doi:10.1016/S1474-4422(05)70253-2. PMID 16361021. 
  8. ^ University of California, San Diego "Synthetic Cannabinoid May Be Used as Brain Cancer Treatment". (28 September 2012) Laboratory Equipment. Retrieved 28 September 2012.