Diósgyőri VTK

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Diósgyőr
Diosgyori VTK logo.png
Full name Diósgyőr- Vasgyári Testgyakorlók Köre
Nickname(s) Diósgyőri VTK
Founded 6 February 1910; 104 years ago (1910-02-06)
Ground Diósgyőr Stadium, Miskolc
Ground Capacity 11,500
Chairman Hungary Hunor Dudás
Head coach Serbia Tomislav Sivíc
League OTP Bank Liga
2013-14 5th
Website Club home page
Current season

Diósgyőri VTK (Hungarian pronunciation: [ˈdioːʃɟøːri veː teː kaː]) is one of the most popular teams in the Hungarian League. The club is based in Miskolc, Hungary. The team plays in the first division of the Hungarian League.[1] Diósgyőr is best known by his passionate supporters. In the past years Diósgyőr had the highest average attendance in the top division of the Hungarian League. Diósgyőr enjoyed its first golden age at the late '70s and the beginning of the '80s. Most of the club achievements are from that period like the record high third place in the 1978–79 season of the Hungarian League and Diósgyőr lifted the Hungarian Cup twice in 1977 and 1980.

History[edit]

1910s[edit]

The preparations for the establishment of a sports club of the ironworks started at the end of the 1909. Vilmos Vanger, an elementary school teacher and a five-member committee asked the director of the iron works to approve the foundation of a sports club. On 6 February 1910, the Diósgyőr-Vasgyári Testgyakorlók Köre was founded at the premises of the factory. The red and white were chosen as the colours of the club. Vilmos Vanger was nominated as the first president of the club, while, Árpád Weisz became the vice-president. The secretary was Andor Erdélyi, while the finance director was István Hamza. The first coach of the club was Gyula Molnár.[2]

The foundation of the club was approved by the Ministry of Interior therefore the club could participate in a Hungarian League match as early as 1912. In 1916 and 1918 the club won the Northern Hungarian championships. The club had played with all of the first league teams when it celebrated its 10th birthday.[3]

1940s[edit]

The club first reached the top league of the Hungarian League in 1940. In the 1940-41 season Diósgyőr finished 6th as Diósgyőri MÁVAG. János Füzér and István Berecz scored 33 goals during the season. In the following season, 1941-42 Diósgyőr finished 8th. During this season the club was able to beat Ferencváros by 3-2 during the season. The results of the 1942-43 season was a bit worse since the club finished only the 12th, however, during this season they also could beat its Budapest rival Ferencváros 2-1 at home. In the 1943-44 season the club finished 11th.[4]

1970s[edit]

An international football match in 1979

Diósgyőr won the 1976-77 season of the Hungarian Cup, therefore they qualified for the UEFA Cup Winners' Cup 1977-78 season. In the first round they encountered with the Turkish Beşiktaş J.K.. The first leg was won by the Turkish club 2-0 at the İnönü Stadium,[5] while Diósgyőr trashed Besiktas at home in Miskolc.[6] In the second round Diósgyőr hosted the 1976–77 Yugoslav Cup winner Hajduk Split and they won the match by 2-1.[7] However, in the second leg the Hungarian team lost to 2-1 and 4-3 on penalty shoot-out.[8]

In the 1978-79 season of the Hungarian League the club has reached its best result ever finishing on the third position of the table. Therefore, they qualified for the 1979-80 UEFA Cup.[9] On 19 September 1979 Diósgyőr was hosted by SK Rapid Wien at the Gerhard Hanappi Stadium and the match was won by the Hungarian club by 1-0.[10] On 3 October 1979 the second leg was also won by the Hungarian club by 3-2.[11] On 24 October 1979, Diósgyőr was hosted by the Scottish club, Dundee United F.C. at the Tannadice Park. The match was won by Diósgyőr.[12] The second leg was won by Diósgyőr by 3-1 at home, therefore the Hungarian team could qualify for the third round of the cup.[13] on 28 November 1979, in the third round Diósgyőr faced with the giant German club 1. FC Kaiserslautern and they lost 2-0 at home which resulted a very difficult return match for the Miskolc team.[14] On 12 December 1979 Kaiserslautern beat Diósgyőr 6-1 which resulted the farewell for the team since the German club advanced on 8-1 aggregate.[15]

1990s[edit]

József Verebes a.k.a. "The magician" managed Diósgyőr in 1996

The fall of communism in Hungary also affected the club as any other clubs in the country. In 1992 the club's name was changed into Diósgyőri FC. In 2000 the club went bankrupt and many players left the club. Disógyőr was able to finish the 1999-2000 season but they were relegated since the club finished 16th.

The team spent seven years in the 2nd division. After many coaches, the breakthrough was the second appearance of coach Barnabás Tornyi. The next year they were again in the first division. The most memorable scenes were winning the second division championship, and the last match of goalkeeping-legend György Veréb. At his last match (aged 49!) and with him the team defeated the Videoton FC, 4-1. The leading players were midfielder László Kiser, and striker duo Sándor Kulcsár and Gábor Egressy. In the next season the team beat the FTC and the Újpest FC, and began the UEFA Intertoto Cup. The owners wanted to make football without spending money, and the club disappeared in 2000, via bankruptcy. In the winter of 1999 most players left the club.

2000s[edit]

Ferencváros legend, Zoltán Varga managed Diósgyőr in 2000

After the bankruptcy the fans founded again the Diósgyőri VTK and enlisted it into the Hungarian League. The club spent its first season in the seventh division. However, thanks to a merger with Borsod Volán SE the club could play in the third division in the 2000-01 season of the Hungarian League. Although the club could not get promoted into the second division, Diósgyőr could play in the second division again in the 2001-02 season since they merged with Bőcs who already got promoted to the second division. In the second league financial problems also hindered the success of the club and finally the club went bankrupt again. However, the Diósgyőri VTK 1910 Limited company was founded and later purchased the right to play in the second division from Monor. In 2003-04 the club was promoted to the first division of the Hungarian League, although due to financial problems the club was able to play in the first league with the help of the Siófok KC Ltd. who moved to Miskolc.

Diósgyőr play in the 2004-05, 2005-06, 2006-07, 2007-08, 2008-09, 2009-10 seasons of the first division. However, the centenarian celebrations were ruined by the fact that the club finished 16th and was relegated to the second division after spending six consecuitve seasons in the top flight of the Hungarian league.

2010s[edit]

Diósgyőr won the 2010-11 season of the second division of the Hungarian league and it was promoted after spending only one season in the second league. In the 2011-12 season the club finished 7th. On 27 July 2012 Diósgyőr started 2012–13 Nemzeti Bajnokság I season with a 2-1 victory over Újpest FC.[16] On 12 September 2012 Hungarian international team player and former Genoa C.F.C. player Gergely Rudolf signed a three-year contract with Diósgyőr.[17]

On 7 May 2014, Diósgyőr qualified for the final of the 2013-14 Hungarian Cup after beating Debrecen 2-0 at home.[18][19] The first tie was won by Debrecen by 4-2.[20] Diósgyőr lost to Újpest in the 2013–14 Hungarian Cup final on penalty shoot-out,[21] but Diósgyőr are eligible for the 2014-15 UEFA Europa League since Újpest did not receive the UEFA licence from the Hungarian Football Federation.[22]

Stadium[edit]

Main article: DVTK Stadion
The Diósgyőri Stadium in Diósgyőr, Miskolc

The home of the club is the multi-purpose DVTK Stadion located in Miskolc, Borsod-Abaúj-Zemplén County, Hungary. The maximum capacity of the stadium is approximately 17 000 spectators.

The played their matches from 1911 to 1939 near the diner of the Diósgyőr Ironworks. The stadium was first opened on 25 June 1939.

In 1968 the stadium underwent some major expansions to approximately 22,000 seats. The stadium was then reopened after renovations on 26 May 1968. At that time, it was the biggest stadium in Hungary outside of Budapest. The highest attendance record for the stadium was set on 27 November 1968, when approximately 35,000 people saw a match between the DVTK and the Ferencvárosi TC. Today its capacity is only about 17,000 because the stadium's directors always close two sections of stands to separate the fans of the home and visiting teams for security reasons.

The Complex now has a large stadium: the western Main Stand that was built in 1939. Three other wings were built in 1968, with a grass surface and a rekortan covered running track, where football matches and athletic championships are held. The Complex contains one grass surfaced training field built in 1977, one with artificial turf built in 2006, and two others with cinder covering that opened in the 1960s. The artificial grass field has lighting. Near the stadium there is a covered training field and a former boxing arena re-opened for soccer in 2009. Although the stadium does not meet the standards of many other European stadiums, it is the most modern arena in Eastern Hungary. The lighting was installed and began operating on 15 November 2003.

The Main Stand had its first renovation in 2005–06 and after a significant modernization project, it was opened on 23 April 2006 with a roof over 1,504 seats. In 2009–2010 the eastern-wing of the 40-year-old stands was demolished. For the 100th birthday of the club, new covered stands were built with a buffet, restrooms, and 3,137 seats on the so-called "Sunny wing" or "Napos oldal". This wing was so-named because the sun would make it difficult for fans to watch matches during afternoon competition. Construction began on 10 August 2009 and an opening ceremony was held on 6 March 2010. The 2009–10 renovation cost 400 million HUF. In 2011–2012, the training fields were modernized, and two additional fields were built. Currently, there are four training fields with lighting, two with natural grass and 2 with artificial grass.

From 1992 to 2000, the field was named DFC Stadium, because the team changed its name from DVTK to Diósgyőr Football club. During the 2007–2008 season the name of the stadium was DVTK-Borsodi Stadium, because of a sponsorship arrangement.

A famous section of the stadium called the Csáki-stand is named after the fan, József Csáki.

Naming history[edit]

  • 1910–38: Diósgyőri VTK
  • 1938–45: Diósgyőri MÁVAG SC
  • 1945–51: Diósgyőri VTK
  • 1951–56: Diósgyőri Vasas
  • 1956–92: Diósgyőri VTK Miskolc
  • 1992–00: Diósgyőr FC
  • 2000–03: Diósgyőri VTK
  • 2003–04: DVTK 1910
  • 2004–05: Diósgyőri Balaton FC (later Diósgyőri VTK-BFC)
  • 2005–07: Diósgyőri VTK
  • 2007-08: Diósgyőri VTK-BORSODI
  • 2008–: Diósgyőri VTK

Current squad[edit]

As of 17 June, 2014.

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Position Player
3 Bosnia and Herzegovina DF Senad Husić
4 Hungary DF Tamás Kádár
5 Brazil DF William Alves
7 Serbia DF Dražen Okuka
9 Hungary FW Patrik Bacsa
14 Hungary DF András Debreceni
15 Hungary DF András Vági
17 Hungary MF Tamás Egerszegi
18 Hungary MF András Gosztonyi
19 Serbia FW Miroslav Grumic
20 Hungary MF Márk Nikházi
No. Position Player
21 Hungary MF Gábor Bori
22 Croatia GK Ivan Rados
25 Hungary MF Ákos Elek
28 Hungary MF Balázs Szabó
29 Hungary DF Milán Németh
31 Hungary MF Dávid Barczi
49 Hungary MF Martin Csirszki
55 Hungary GK Vince Gelei
89 Serbia MF Lazar Marjanović
94 Hungary DF Gábor Eperjes
99 Hungary GK Botond Antal
-- Hungary FW Tamás Takács


Out on loan[edit]

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Position Player
 

B squad[edit]

As of 24 September 2013

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Position Player
5 Hungary DF Bálint Oláh
10 Hungary MF Ádám Menyhért
12 Hungary DF Norbert Galambos
16 Hungary MF Dávid Mészár
19 Hungary FW Zsolt Icsó
30 Hungary MF Márk Kerényi
35 Hungary DF Marcell Mahalek
38 Hungary DF Máté Czégel
39 Hungary DF Richárd Juhász
41 Hungary MF Botond Kovács
No. Position Player
42 Hungary MF Richárd Bodnár
44 Hungary DF Milán Csicsvári
46 Hungary DF Máté Galambosi
52 Hungary FW Alex Balogh
55 Hungary DF Patrik Bocsi
70 Hungary FW Marcell Hornyák
71 Hungary FW Máté Fézler
77 Hungary DF Milán Imre Nemes
91 Hungary GK Róbert Ragályi
96 Hungary MF István Timkó


Non-playing staff[edit]

Board of directors[edit]

Position Name
Chief executive officer Hungary Hunor Dudás
Executive assistant Hungary Norbert Szemán

Management[edit]

Position Name
Sports director Hungary Zoltán Kovács
Head coach Serbia Tomislav Sivić
Assistant coach Serbia Vladimir Radenkovic
Assistant coach Hungary Ferenc Bene Junior
Under 21 Coach Hungary Alpár Mészáros
Under 18 Coach Hungary Zoltán Vitelki
Under 17 Coach Hungary István Kriston
Goalkeeping Coach Hungary György Veréb

Honours[edit]

Domestic[edit]

Season results in Top League[edit]

Domestic International Manager
League Cup League
Cup
Super
Cup
No. Season MP W D L GF–GA Dif. Pts. Pos. Competition Result
1. 1940-41 26 11 5 10 61-57 +4 27 6th Did not qualify Hungary Csapkay
2. 1941-42 30 10 9 11 72-68 +4 29 8th R Hungary Csapkay
3. 1942-43 30 9 8 13 54-78 -14 26 12th Hungary Wetzer
4. 1943-44 30 11 6 13 49-59 -10 28 11th Hungary Tomecskó
5. 1945 22 4 1 17 29-82 -53 9 10th Hungary Tomecskó
6. 1950 15 5 6 4 21-23 -2 16 8th Hungary Tomecskó
7. 1951 26 6 7 13 31-52 -11 19 11th Hungary Tomecskó
8. 1952 26 6 4 16 31-64 -33 16 13th Hungary Szabó
9. 1954 26 10 3 13 49-61 -12 23 9th Hungary Jánosi
10. 1955 26 6 7 13 40-53 -13 19 12th Hungary Jánosi
11. 1957-58 26 10 6 10 32-35 -3 26 9th Hungary Teleki
12. 1958-59 26 6 10 10 28-35 -7 22 9th Hungary Kiss
13. 1959-60 26 10 7 9 35-30 +5 27 5th Hungary Kiss
14. 1960-61 26 3 6 17 25-65 -40 12 14th Hungary Bodola
15. 1963 13 4 3 6 12-19 -7 11 11th Hungary Bukovi
16. 1964 26 4 6 16 14-38 -24 14 14th Hungary Nagy
17. 1966 26 10 4 12 30-31 -1 24 9th Hungary Preiner
18. 1967 30 10 8 12 48-54 -6 28 7th Hungary Szabó
19. 1968 30 8 8 14 36-56 -20 24 13th Hungary Sebes, Hungary Szigeti
20. 1969 30 7 9 14 31-51 -20 23 13th Hungary Tátrai
21. 1970 14 7 4 3 16-13 +3 18 8th Hungary Tátrai
22. 1970-71 30 10 7 13 24-46 -22 32 12th Hungary Tóth
23. 1971-72 30 9 6 15 32-46 -14 24 12th Hungary Tóth
24. 1972-73 30 9 6 15 32-46 -14 24 15th Hungary Preiner
25. 1974-75 28 7 11 10 26-37 -11 25 11th Hungary Szabó
26. 1975-76 30 6 12 12 26-44 -18 24 14th Hungary Szabó
27. 1976-77 34 13 6 15 40-52 -12 32 10th W Hungary Szabó
28. 1978-79 34 19 6 9 60-37 +23 44 3rd Hungary Szabó
29. 1979-80 34 12 8 14 47-42 +5 32 12th W UEFA Cup Third round Hungary Szabó
30. 1980-81 34 5 15 14 28-50 -22 25 15th R UEFA Cup Winners' Cup Preliminary round Hungary Szabó, Hungary Deák, Hungary Puskás
31. 1981-82 34 9 11 14 48-62 -14 29 14th Did not qualify Hungary Puskás
32. 1982-83 30 8 11 11 36-44 -8 27 9th Hungary Puskás
33. 1983-84 30 2 9 19 25-53 -28 13 16th Hungary Fekete
34. 1991-92 30 6 10 14 24-44 -20 22 14th 1 Romania Vlad
35. 1992-93 30 7 9 14 26-45 -19 23 13th Ukraine Sándor
36. 1997-98 34 12 8 14 46-41 +5 44 11th Hungary Tornyi
37. 1998-99 34 14 9 11 56-54 +2 51 8th UEFA Intertoto Cup Second round Hungary Tornyi
38. 1999-00 32 5 9 18 26-56 -30 24 16th Did not qualify Hungary Szapor, Hungary Temesvári
39. 2004–05 30 11 4 15 39-45 -6 37 9th Hungary Gálhidi
40. 2005–06 30 10 7 13 33-44 -11 37 8th Hungary Pajkos
41. 2006–07 30 11 5 14 40-52 -12 38 9th Hungary Csank
42. 2007–08 30 5 13 12 43-63 -20 28 13th L16 Hungary Pajkos, Hungary Vágó
43. 2008–09 30 9 6 15 29-45 -16 33 12th L8 Hungary Gálhidi, Hungary Sisa
44. 2009–10 30 4 5 21 31-56 -25 17 16th R2 L16 Hungary Dusztlus
45. 2011–12 30 13 4 13 42-43 -1 43 7th L16 Hungary Benczés, Hungary Szentes
46. 2012–13 30 9 11 10 31-39 -8 38 10th L16 Hungary Szentes, Croatia Kovács
47. 2013–14 29 12 10 7 44-37 +7 46 5th R W Serbia Sivić
48. 2014–15 Europa League Serbia Sivić
Σ ? ? ? ? ? ? ?
Notes
  • Note 1: Relegation play-off: Diósgyőr 2-1 BKV Előre; BKV Előre 0-1 Diósgyőr

European cup history[edit]

Season Competition Round Club Home Away Aggregate
1977–78 European Cup Winners' Cup 1R Turkey Beşiktaş J.K. 5–0 0–2 5–2
2R Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Hajduk Split 2–1 1–2 3–3(aet)
1979–80 UEFA Cup 1R Austria SK Rapid Wien 3–2 1–0 4–2
2R Scotland Dundee United FC 3–1 1–0 4–1
3R West Germany 1. FC Kaiserslautern 0–2 1–6 1–8
1980–81 European Cup Winners' Cup PR Scotland Celtic Glasgow 2–1 0–6 2–7
1998 UEFA Intertoto Cup 1R Malta Sliema Wanderers 2–0 3–2 5–2
2R Turkey Altay Izmir 0–1 1–1 1–2
2014–15 UEFA Europa League 1Q Malta Birkirkara 2–1
Notes
  • 1R: First round
  • 2R: Second round
  • 3R: Third round
  • PR: Preliminary round
  • 1Q: First qualifying round

Record by country of opposition[edit]

Country Pld W D L GF GA GD Win%
Austria Austria 2 2 0 0 4 2 +2 100.000
Germany Germany 2 0 0 2 1 8 -7 00.00
Malta Malta 3 3 0 0 7 3 +4 100.000
Scotland Scotland 4 3 0 1 6 8 -2 75.00
Turkey Turkey 4 1 1 2 6 4 +2 25.00
Croatia Yugoslavia 2 1 0 1 3 3 +0 50.00
Totals 16 9 1 6 25 27 –2 56.25

P - Played; W - Won; D - Drawn; L - Lost

Former coaches[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Diósgyőr's UEFA Profile". UEFA. 12 September 2012. Retrieved 12 September 2012. 
  2. ^ "History of Diósgyőr". www.dvtk.eu. 23 September 2013. 
  3. ^ "History of Diósgyőr". www.dvtk.eu. 23 September 2013. 
  4. ^ "History of Diósgyőr". www.dvtk.eu. 23 September 2013. 
  5. ^ "UEFA Cup Winners' Cup 1977-78: Besiktas 2-0 Diósgyőr". www.uefa.com. 23 September 2013. 
  6. ^ "UEFA Cup Winners' Cup 1977-78: Diósgyőr 5-0 Diósgyőr". www.uefa.com. 23 September 2013. 
  7. ^ "UEFA Cup Winners' Cup 1977-78: Diósgyőr 2-1 Hajduk Split". UEFA. 23 September 2013. 
  8. ^ "UEFA Cup Winners' Cup 1977-78: Hajduk Split 2-1 Diósgyőr". www.uefa.com. 23 September 2013. 
  9. ^ "1979/80: Schaub first for Frankfurt". www.uefa.com. 23 September 2013. 
  10. ^ "UEFA Cup 1979-80: Rapid Wien 0-1 Diósgyőr". www.uefa.com. 23 September 2013. 
  11. ^ "UEFA Cup 1979-80: Diósgyőr 3-2 Rapid Wien". www.uefa.com. 23 September 2013. 
  12. ^ "UEFA Cup 1979-80: Dundee United 0-1 Diósgyőr". www.uefa.com. 23 September 2013. 
  13. ^ "UEFA Cup 1979-80: Diósgyőr 3-1 Dundee United". www.uefa.com. 23 September 2013. 
  14. ^ "UEFA Cup 1979-80: Diósgyőr 0-2 Kaiserslautern". www.uefa.com. 23 September 2013. 
  15. ^ "UEFA Cup 1979-80: Kaiserslautern 6-1 Diósgyőr". www.uefa.com. 23 September 2013. 
  16. ^ "Diósgyőr 2-1 Újpest". UEFA. 27 July 2012. Retrieved 27 July 2012. 
  17. ^ "Diósgyőr signs Gergely Rudolf". Transfermarkt. 12 September 2012. Retrieved 12 September 2012. 
  18. ^ "Magyar Kupa: döntős a Diósgyőr, kiesett a DVSC". www.nso.hu. 7 May 2014. 
  19. ^ "Szinte biztosan El-induló a a Loki ellen kupadöntőbe jutó Diósgyőr". www.nso.hu. 7 May 2014. 
  20. ^ "MK: a DVSC kétgólos előnybe került a DVTK-val szemben". www.nso.hu. 15 April 2014. 
  21. ^ "MK-döntő: az Újpest 11-esekkel győzött a DVTK ellen!". NemzetiSport. 25 April 2014. 
  22. ^ "Újpest: nincs UEFA-licenc, a Diósgyőr indul az El-ben". NemzetiSport. 31 April 2014. 

Sources[edit]

Lajos Varga: Diósgyőri Futballtörténet (Diósgyőr Soccerhistory)

External links[edit]