Diamond, Missouri

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Diamond, Missouri
City
Location of Diamond, Missouri
Location of Diamond, Missouri
Coordinates: 36°59′40″N 94°18′50″W / 36.99444°N 94.31389°W / 36.99444; -94.31389Coordinates: 36°59′40″N 94°18′50″W / 36.99444°N 94.31389°W / 36.99444; -94.31389
Country United States
State Missouri
County Newton
Area[1]
 • Total 0.75 sq mi (1.94 km2)
 • Land 0.75 sq mi (1.94 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 1,158 ft (353 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 902
 • Estimate (2013[3]) 926
 • Density 1,202.7/sq mi (464.4/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 64840
Area code(s) 417
FIPS code 29-19432[4]
GNIS feature ID 0716874[5]

Diamond is a city in Newton County, Missouri, United States near Joplin, Missouri. The population was 902 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Joplin, Missouri, Metropolitan Statistical Area. Diamond is primarily renowned as the birthplace of George Washington Carver.

History[edit]

Mining was historically the primary industry in Diamond.[6]

Diamond was originally called Round Grove and later Center. When a post office was acquired in 1883, Frank Whitwell renamed the town Diamond. The first post office in the woodworking room at the back of the blacksmith shop. A number of events helped to establish the town of Diamond. In September 1891 a wind pump was put up to send water to different parts of town. The firms doing business in 1893 were Lynch & Hoyt, dealers in general merchandise; W.W. Parr, harness and harness fixtures; Dr. Filler, Doctor and Druggist; Adam Apple, a feed store and feed yard; Martin Beyer, milling business; Hill & Ridenour, dealers in general merchandise; Whitwell & Greer, blacksmithing, woodworking and machine repairing; J. H. Robinson and Owen Ridenour, breeders of fine jersey cattle; C. T. Caraway, raising fine Shrops Shire sheep. The Splitlog Railroad, ran north and south on the west connecting both divisions of the Frisco. By 1904, J. T. Lee was the constable and by July 1913 a number of buildings were being wired for electric lights, as Empire lines would be running through Diamond in the near future. However, it was not until 1918 that Diamond actually received electricity. Paving of many of the streets were paid for by local businessmen. In July 1934, Market Street was paved from Highway 71 east to Depot. In March 1945, a siren was installed at the top of Clary & Love Mill to call out the fire truck. It was not until December 15, 1949, that Diamond became a 4th class city.

The county court appointed the following citizens to serve as the first city officials until the April, 1950 election: Mayor, Bert Whitchurch; Collector, William Robinson; City Marshall, Harry Buchanan; West Alderman, Ray Martin; West Alderman, Dwight Sims; East Alderman, Richard Richards; East Alderman, L.E. “Litt” Jones. The city voted on a 20 year franchise for gas on February 5, 1957. The vote was 223-0. In March, 1952, Diamond passed a $102,000 bond issue to drill a 1,000 foot well and provide a water system for the city. This project was completed in March, 1959 with the installation of a water tower and a 50,000 gallon tank. In July 1961, the Diamond Volunteer Fire Department was organized. Over a twelve year period beginning in 1961, the city acquired 36 mercury vapor lights, the new sewage system with two sewage lagoons and a new fire truck.

1871: A school was built in 1871 at the corner of the present Main and Market. It was called Center.

1874: A blacksmith shop and woodworking business was started by John Randol and Hobby.

1883: On March 18, Diamond’s first post office opened in the wood working room in the rear of the blacksmith shop. Frances Whitwell was made postmaster and Center was renamed Diamond.

1884: John T McElhaney built a building and opened a General Merchandise business.

1891: a wind pump was put up to send water to different parts of town.

1892: Dr. Filler opened a Drug Store.

1893: By now, several businesses had been established and a few had changed hands among local businessmen.

Operating in Diamond in 1893 were: Lynch & Hoyt, dealers in general merchandise; W. W. Parr, harness and harness fixtures; Dr. Filler, Doctor and druggist; Adam Apple, feed yard and feed store; Martin Beyer, milling business; Hill & Ridenour, dealers in general merchandise; Whitwell & Greer, blacksmithing, wood working, and machine repairing; J. H. Robinson and Owen Ridenour, breeders of Jersey cattle; and C. T. Caraway, breeder of fine Shrops Shire sheep. Diamond had two daily mails, one north and one south, connected by two daily Hack Lines with accommodations for passengers. The town also had a school that conducted classes nine months a year and a Public Hall. 1894: Weems and Martin built a store building and the post office moved there. George Weems was made postmaster. 1896: It was decided to abandon the one room school building and construct a new two room school; this building was completed in July 1896. In August of that year, C.U. Williams became to the first Principal of Diamond School. Diamond’s first graduating class, the class of ‘98 consisted of three boys and six girls. 1905-1906: J.T. Lee was City Constable.

1906-1907: C. A. Williams was City Constable.

1907: The school board voted to borrow $1,000.00 for the purpose of constructing a new room on the school house.

1909: The first Diamond High School commencement took place on April 26, 1909.

1913: A number of buildings were wired for electric lights as Empire lines would be running through Diamond in the near future. 1917: Due to rapidly growing enrollment, the school board voted to construct a two-story brick building. 1918: Diamond received electricity. 1921: Diamond School consolidated with Locust Grove, Modern and Fairview school districts to become Consolidated District # 2 in Newton County. 1932: Tragedy struck Diamond Schools in March of 1932. Fire destroyed the two story brick building. 1934: Market Street was paved from Highway 71 to Depot Street. 1945: A siren was installed at the top of Clary & Love Mill to call out the fire truck. 1949: Diamond becomes a fourth class city. The county court appointed the following citizens to serve as the first Board of Aldermen until the April, 1950, election: Bert Whitchurch, Mayor; William Robinson, Collector; Harry Buchanan, City Marshall; Ray Martin, West Alderman; Dwight Sims, West Alderman; Richard Richards, East Alderman; L.E. “Litt” Jones, East Alderman. 1952: Diamond passed a $102,000.00 bond issue to drill a 1,000 foot well to provide a water system for the City. The project was completed in March, 1959. 1957: The city voted on a 20 year franchise of gas. The vote was 223-0. 1961: Beginning in 1961 Wilbert Schaffer, served the city as Mayor for 12 years. During his tenure, the city acquired 36 vapor street lights, the sewage system with two sewage lagoons, and a new fire truck. In July, 1961, the Diamond Volunteer Fire Department was organized.

For a peek at more recent Diamond history, make friends with some of Diamond’s older citizens. They would enjoy sharing their memories with new citizens who are interested in Diamond’s past and future.

    • Source for these tidbits of Diamond History: “Diamond, The Gem City”, By Larry A. and Linda Petty James, a 1995 publication of The Newton County Historical Society.

Geography[edit]

Diamond is located at 36°59′40″N 94°18′50″W / 36.99444°N 94.31389°W / 36.99444; -94.31389 (36.994573, -94.313826).[7]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.75 square miles (1.94 km2), all of it land.[1]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1950 405
1960 453 11.9%
1970 608 34.2%
1980 766 26.0%
1990 775 1.2%
2000 808 4.3%
2010 902 11.6%
Est. 2013 926 2.7%
U.S. Decennial Census

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 902 people, 372 households, and 250 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,202.7 inhabitants per square mile (464.4/km2). There were 409 housing units at an average density of 545.3 per square mile (210.5/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 94.0% White, 0.7% African American, 1.4% Native American, 0.1% Asian, 1.1% from other races, and 2.7% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.9% of the population.

There were 372 households of which 36.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.8% were married couples living together, 12.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 7.0% had a male householder with no wife present, and 32.8% were non-families. 28.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.42 and the average family size was 2.95.

The median age in the city was 35 years. 26.7% of residents were under the age of 18; 9.9% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 23.4% were from 25 to 44; 24.7% were from 45 to 64; and 15.4% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 49.8% male and 50.2% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 808 people, 320 households, and 234 families residing in the town. The population density was 1,215.2 people per square mile (472.1/km²). There were 350 housing units at an average density of 528.0 per square mile (204.8/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 96.42% White, 0.74% African American, 1.50% Native American, 0.12% Asian, 0.25% from other races, and 1.00% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.36% of the population.

There were 320 households out of which 36.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.6% were married couples living together, 10.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.6% were non-families. 25.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.54 and the average family size was 3.02.

In the town the population was spread out with 27.8% under the age of 18, 12.4% from 18 to 24, 26.6% from 25 to 44, 19.6% from 45 to 64, and 13.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females there were 120.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.5 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $29,000, and the median income for a family was $34,167. Males had a median income of $25,719 versus $20,000 for females. The per capita income for the town was $13,581. About 9.8% of families and 11.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 19.4% of those under age 18 and 5.8% of those age 65 or over.

Notable People[edit]

George Washington Carver born in Diamond, MO in 1864. American scientist, botanist, educator, and inventor.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-08. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-08. 
  3. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-05-30. 
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  5. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ Williams, Walter (1904). The State of Missouri. p. 461. 
  7. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.