Diamond Craters

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Diamond Craters[1]
DiamondCratersMalheurMaar.jpg
Malheur Maar, the only lake-filled maar in Diamond Craters
Elevation 4,708 ft (1,435 m)
Location
Location Harney County, Oregon, U.S.
Range Basin and Range
Coordinates 43°6′N 118°45′W / 43.100°N 118.750°W / 43.100; -118.750
Topo map USGS Diamond Swamp
Geology
Type Volcanic field / shield volcano
Age of rock <60,000 years[2]
Last eruption 5610 BCE ± 470 years
Climbing
Easiest route roads and trails

Diamond Craters is a volcanic field[1][2] or small shield volcano[3] in southeastern Oregon, about 40 miles (64 km) southeast of the town of Burns. It consists of a 23 sq mi (60 km2) area of basaltic lava flows, cinder cones, and maars.[2] The volcanoes are less than 60,000 years old, and some craters may be as recent as 6,000 years based on the sedimentation history in the lake-filled Malheur Maar.[1]

Diamond Craters and the nearby Diamond post office were named after the Diamond Ranch, established in the area by the pioneer Mace McCoy and his partner Albert Hugh Robie. The ranch used a diamond-shaped brand, hence the name.[4]

Notable Vents[edit]

Name Elevation Coordinates Last eruption
Big Bomb Crater[5] 1,308 metres (4,291 ft) - -
Central Crater Complex[5] 1,378 metres (4,521 ft) - -
Cloverleaf Crater[3] - - -
Dry Maar[5] 1,268 metres (4,160 ft) - -
East Twin Crater[5] 1,326 metres (4,350 ft) - -
Keyhole Explosion Crater[5] - - -
Lava Pit Crater[5] 1,305 metres (4,281 ft) - -
Little Red Cone[3] - - -
Malheur Maar[5] 1,286 metres (4,219 ft) - -
Nolf Crater[5] - - -
Oval Crater[5] - - -
Red Bomb Crater[5] 1,323 metres (4,341 ft) - -
West Twin Crater[5] 1,326 metres (4,350 ft) - -

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Diamond Craters". Global Volcanism Program, Smithsonian Institution. http://www.volcano.si.edu/world/volcano.cfm?vnum=1202-17-.
  2. ^ a b c Wood, Charles A.; Jürgen Kienle, eds. (1990). Volcanoes of North America. Cambridge University Press. pp. 208–209. ISBN 978-0-521-43811-7. 
  3. ^ a b c Peterson, Norman V.; Groh, Edward A. (1964). "Diamond Craters, Oregon". the Ore Bin 26 (2): 17–34. 
  4. ^ McArthur, Lewis A.; Lewis L. McArthur (2003) [1928]. Oregon Geographic Names (Seventh ed.). Portland, Oregon: Oregon Historical Society Press. ISBN 978-0-87595-278-9. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "Diamond Craters - Synonyms and Subfeatures". Global Volcanism Program, Smithsonian Institution. http://www.volcano.si.edu/world/volcano.cfm?vnum=1202-17-%26volpage%3Dsynsub. Retrieved 2007-05-26.

External links[edit]