Diana Schaub

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Diana Schaub is professor of political science at Loyola University Maryland.[1] Schaub received both her M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. She teaches and writes on a wide range of issues in political philosophy and American political thought.

Schaub was also a member of the President's Council on Bioethics,[2] and her nomination to that post by President Bush generated controversy.[3] According to a 2006 article in The New Yorker, "Schaub has compared the harvesting of stem cells to slavery, and once said in a speech, 'Every embryo used for purposes of research is someone's blood relative.'"[4]

Career[edit]

After graduating summa cum laude from Kenyon College, Schaub began her career as an assistant managing editor for the conservative magazine, The National Interest in 1985.[5] She then served as a professor of political science at the University of Michigan-Dearborn. In 2003-2005, while serving as a professor at Loyola College, Schaub taught at a series of lectures and seminars designed for high school teachers, held at Ashland University. The conference was titled, “Race and Rights in American History” and was funded by a Teaching American History grant from the U.S. Department of Education.[6]

From 2001-2007 Schaub served as the chair of the political science department at Loyola College. She now continues her teaching career as a professor at Loyola University Maryland.

Publications[edit]

Schaub has co-edited or written two books, What So Proudly We Hail: America’s Soul in Story, Speech, and Song[7] and Erotic Liberalism: Women and Revolution in Montesquieu’s "Persian Letter".[8] Schaub has contributed chapters to several books, including “From Hearth-Fires to Hell-Fires: Hawthorne and the Cartesian Project,” in the book, Apples of Gold in Pictures of Silver: Honoring the Work of Leon R. Kass,[9] and “Captain Kirk and the Art of Rule,” in the book Faith, Reason, and Political Life Today.[10] Schaub has also been published in many academic journals and newspapers including National Affairs,[11] the Baltimore Sun,[12] and The Public Interest.[13]

  • Kass, Amy A., Leon Kass, and Diana Schaub (eds.) (2011). What So Proudly We Hail: America’s Soul in Story, Speech, and Song Intercollegiate Studies Institute ISBN 1-61017-006-7
  • Schaub, Diana J. (1995). Erotic Liberalism: Women and Revolution in Montesquieu's "Persian Letters" Rowman & Littlefield ISBN 0-8476-8039-8

Honors and Awards[edit]

Schaub has received numerous awards and fellowships throughout her career. Schaub was awarded the Richard M. Weaver Prize for Scholarly Letters in 2001, and received a research grant from the Earhart Foundation in 1995. She was also appointed to the Hoover Institution’s Task Force on the Virtues of a Free Society in 2007.[14]

External links[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]