Dice.com

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Dice.com
Dice.com
Headquarters Urbandale, IA, U.S.
Key people Shravan Goli, President, Dice Holdings, Inc.
Mike Durney, Chairman of the Board, President, and Chief Executive Officer, Dice Holdings, Inc.
Thomas M. Silver, Senior Vice President, North America, Dice Holdings, Inc.[1]
Industry Internet
Services Career Website
Website www.dice.com
Alexa rank positive decrease 1164 (December 2014)[2]
Type of site Job search engine, Review Site
Current status Active

Dice.com is a career website based in Urbandale, Iowa. It serves information technology and engineering professionals.[3] Dice.com is owned by Dice Holdings, Inc (NYSEDHX).[4][5] Dice.com typically has approximately 60,000 tech job listings. The website claims to have 3 million registered technology professionals and approximately 2 million unique visitors each month.[6][7] Of those registered users, 75% have a bachelor's degree or higher and 65% have 10 or more years of experience in their field.[6]

In June 2009, Dice.com advertised 48,000 jobs.[8] In 2014, Dice.com advertised 80,000 positions daily.[9]

History[edit]

Founded in 1990 by Lloyd Linn and Diane Rickert, two former contractors, Dice.com had 175 employees by April 2001.[10][11] Today, Dice Holdings, Inc. has 500+ employees worldwide.

Chris Benner, in his 2002 book Work in the new economy: flexible labor markets in Silicon Valley, called Dice.com "[t]he most prominent site in the Silicon Valley high-tech recruiting industry".[11] Dice is an acronym for "Data-processing Independent Consultant's Exchange". In the book, Benner says "the dice imagery actually captures fairly well the type of high-rolling lifestyle that high-end contractors aspire to."[11]

Dice was originally a bulletin board service where recruiters would list open jobs.[11] Dice began operations in the San Francisco Bay Area in 1990. In 1994, the founders moved Dice's headquarters to Des Moines, Iowa. They then launched the URL www.dice.com in 1996. In 1999, Dice opened the career website to direct hiring companies while continuing to serve the recruiting and staffing industry. In February of the same year, it was acquired by EarthWeb.[11]

In 2001, the parent company, Earthweb, changed its name to Dice Inc.[12] In October that same year, Dice.com moved operations to Urbandale, Iowa. Then, in 2003, Dice Inc. completed a financial restructuring and went private. In 2005, Dice Inc. was acquired by Dice Holdings, Inc. which is owned equally by private equity firms General Atlantic LLC and Quadrangle Group LLC.

In 2004, Dice Holdings acquired the career websites ClearanceJobs.com, eFinancialCareers.com and AllHealthcareJobs.com, as well as job fair service Targeted Job Fairs.

Dice Holdings completed an initial public offering in 2007 and its stock began trading on the New York Stock Exchange under the ticker symbol DHX.[4]

In September 2012, Dice Holdings acquired the websites Slashdot, SourceForge and Freecode from Geeknet, forming Slashdot Media.[13]

In August 2013, Dice Holdings acquired The IT Job Board, a business which includes numerous European websites and a targeted marketing business, IT Media. In October 2013, Dice Holdings acquired recruiting startup getTalent [14]

Awards[edit]

In February 2009, Dice won a Stevie Award for excellence in Customer Service.[15]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Dice Holdings Inc. http://www.diceholdingsinc.com/our-company/default.aspx |url= missing title (help). Retrieved 1 December 2014. 
  2. ^ "Dice.com Site Info". Alexa Internet. Retrieved 2014-04-01. 
  3. ^ Levinson, Meredith (2008-11-25). "Current IT Job Losses Won't Mirror 2001 Nightmare". PC World. Archived from the original on 2010-03-04. Retrieved 2010-03-04. 
  4. ^ a b "Dice Holdings quarterly profit falls; gives Q3, Q4 view". Reuters. 2007-08-15. Archived from the original on 2010-03-04. Retrieved 2010-03-04. 
  5. ^ "Dice Holdings 4Q Tops Estimates; Shares Jump". Associated Press. 2010-02-02. Archived from the original on 2010-03-04. Retrieved 2010-03-04. 
  6. ^ a b "Why Use Dice". Dice.com. 2010. Retrieved 2010-03-21. 
  7. ^ Gardyasz, Joe (2008-07-19). "From jobs board to professional community". BusinessRecord. Retrieved 2010-03-21. 
  8. ^ Thibodeau, Patrick (2009-06-08). "White House plan to create 600K jobs in 100 days won't help tech". Computerworld. Retrieved 2010-03-21. 
  9. ^ Krill, Paul (2014-09-19). "Wanted: Puppet, Python, hottest of the red-hot tech skills". InfoWorld. Archived from the original on 2014-11-11. Retrieved 2014-11-11. 
  10. ^ Crane, Joyce Pellino (2004-03-25). "Local recruiter sees bright spots in high-tech job market: Dice.com works around the globe". Boston Globe. Archived from the original on 2010-03-04. Retrieved 2010-03-04. 
  11. ^ a b c d e Benner, Chris (2002). Work in the new economy: flexible labor markets in Silicon Valley. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 120–121. ISBN 0-631-23250-8. Retrieved 2010-03-04. 
  12. ^ Silverstein, Barry (2002). Business to business Internet marketing: seven proven strategies for increasing profits through Internet direct marketing. Gulf Breeze, FL: Maximum Press. p. 233. ISBN 1-885068-72-7. Retrieved 2010-03-04. 
  13. ^ Timothy Lord (2012-09-18). "Dice Buys Geeknet's Media Business, Including Slashdot, In $20M Deal". Retrieved 2012-09-18.  "Press release". 2012-09-18. Retrieved 2012-09-18. 
  14. ^ http://techcrunch.com/2013/12/05/dice-acquires-gettalent/
  15. ^ "Results of the 3rd annual Stevie Awards for Sales & Customer Services". Stevie Awards. 2009-02-09. Archived from the original on 2010-10-23. Retrieved 2010-03-21. 

External links[edit]