Dickie Moore (ice hockey)

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Dickie Moore
Hockey Hall of Fame, 1974
Born (1931-01-06) January 6, 1931 (age 83)
Montreal, QC, CAN
Height 5 ft 10 in (178 cm)
Weight 185 lb (84 kg; 13 st 3 lb)
Position Left Wing
Shot Left
Played for NHL
Montreal Canadiens
Toronto Maple Leafs
St. Louis Blues
AHL
Buffalo Bisons
Playing career 1951–1968

Richard Winston "Dickie" Moore (born January 6, 1931) is a Canadian former professional hockey player, successful businessman and community philanthropist. He twice won the Art Ross Trophy as the National Hockey League's leading scorer and was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame.

Career[edit]

Moore played with the Montreal Canadiens from 1951 to 1963. He started playing with the Montreal Jr. Royals for three seasons from 1947 to 1950, and made his debut with the Montreal Canadiens in the middle of the 1951–52 season. Moore had played on two Memorial Cup winners, one with the Montreal Royals in 1949 and Montreal Junior Canadiens the following year. He was known for his hard accurate shot and his ability to stickhandle the puck. He twice won the Art Ross Memorial Trophy as the league's leading scorer. Moore broke Gordie Howe's record of 95 total points in a regular season play with 41 goals and 55 assists.

Moore won the Stanley Cup for the first time in 1953 and was a member of the Montreal Canadiens team that won five consecutive cups from 1956–60. He retired following the 1962–63 season, but came back after a year's hiatus to play for the Toronto Maple Leafs. Another three-year break saw Moore return to play 27 games for the St. Louis Blues.

In 1974, Moore was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame. In 1998, he was ranked number 31 on The Hockey News' list of the 100 Greatest Hockey Players.

Later life[edit]

Following his retirement from hockey, Moore became a successful businessman, operating a tool rental business in Montreal.

On November 12, 2005, the Canadiens retired the uniform number 12 in honor of both Moore and Yvan Cournoyer.

On August 27, 2006, Moore suffered neck, spine and rib injuries when his car was hit by a truck in Montreal. He was trapped in the car for 45 minutes before rescue.[1]

Awards and records[edit]

Career statistics[edit]

    Regular season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1948–49 Montreal Junior Canadiens QJHL
1948–49 Montreal Royals QSHL 2 0 0 0 0
1951–52 Montreal Royals QSHL 26 15 20 35 32
1951–52 Montreal Canadiens NHL 33 18 15 33 44 11 1 1 2 12
1952–53 Buffalo Bisons AHL 6 2 3 5 10
1952–53 Montreal Canadiens NHL 18 2 6 8 19 12 3 2 5 13
1953–54 Montreal Royals QHL 2 0 1 1 4
1953–54 Montreal Canadiens NHL 13 1 4 5 12 11 5 8 13 8
1954–55 Montreal Canadiens NHL 67 16 20 36 32 12 1 5 6 22
1955–56 Montreal Canadiens NHL 70 11 39 50 55 10 3 6 9 12
1956–57 Montreal Canadiens NHL 70 29 29 58 56 10 3 7 10 4
1957–58 Montreal Canadiens NHL 70 36 48 84 65 10 4 7 11 4
1958–59 Montreal Canadiens NHL 70 41 55 96 61 11 5 12 17 8
1959–60 Montreal Canadiens NHL 62 22 42 64 54 8 6 4 10 4
1960–61 Montreal Canadiens NHL 57 35 34 69 62 6 3 1 4 4
1961–62 Montreal Canadiens NHL 57 19 22 41 54 6 4 2 6 8
1962–63 Montreal Canadiens NHL 67 24 26 50 61 5 0 1 1 2
1964–65 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 38 2 4 6 68 5 1 1 2 6
1967–68 St. Louis Blues NHL 27 5 3 8 9 18 7 7 14 15
NHL totals 719 261 347 608 652 135 46 64 110 122

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Report: Habs great Moore seriously hurt in accident". ESPN.com. 2006-08-30. Retrieved 2006-08-30. 

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Gordie Howe
Winner of the Art Ross Trophy
1958, 1959
Succeeded by
Bobby Hull