Dickstein Shapiro

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Dickstein Shapiro LLP
Dickstein Shapiro
Headquarters Washington, D.C.
No. of offices 6
No. of attorneys approximately 400
No. of employees approximately 800
Major practice areas Litigation, intellectual property, public policy, corporate law, insurance law, energy law, antitrust
Key people James D. Kelly, Chairman[1]
Revenue $281M[2]
Date founded 1953[3]
Company type Limited liability partnership
Slogan Experience innovation
Website
Dicksteinshapiro.com

Dickstein Shapiro LLP (formerly Dickstein, Shapiro, Morin & Oshinsky[4]) is a large U.S. law firm and lobbying group based in Washington, D.C., with six offices across the United States. According to the National Law Journal's 2012 rankings, it is the 128th largest law firm in the United States. The firm also ranked 75th in profit per attorney on the 2012 AmLaw 200 survey.[2]

Practice areas[edit]

The firm is divided into seven practice groups, each of which handle various aspects of their respective specialties: Complex Dispute resolution, Corporate & Finance, Energy, Government Law & Strategy (includes lobbying, political law, regulatory law and government contracts), Insurance coverage, Intellectual property, and Litigation.

Pro Bono

Dickstein Shapiro has been recognized by the DC Bar for its leadership in pro bono representation.[5] It is one of the law firms representing the detainees at the Guantanamo Bay detention camp.

History[edit]

Dickstein Shapiro was founded by Sidney Dickstein and David I. Shapiro in New York City in 1953. By 1956, the firm moved its headquarters to Washington, DC.[6] The firm quickly established its reputation by winning several high-profile cases, including Silver v. New York Stock Exchange before the United States Supreme Court.

Over the following decades, the firm grew organically and through lateral hiring. In 2001, Dickstein Shapiro merged with Roberts, Sheridan & Kotel, a New York boutique firm that had spun off from Cravath, Swaine & Moore and which was primarily focused on corporate finance and tax law.[7]

In 2012, the firm entered into merger discussions with San Francisco-based international firm Pillsbury Winthrop, but those talks ended by early 2013.[8]

Offices[edit]

Notable lawyers and employees[edit]

Notable alumni[edit]

Notable Clients[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kelly's attorney bio
  2. ^ a b AmLaw200 Performance Statistics, 2007
  3. ^ Firm Website
  4. ^ Press release mentioning name change
  5. ^ "D.C. Bar Raises $650,000 for Pro Bono". BLT- Blog of the Legal Times. Legal Times. Retrieved 2012-11-30. 
  6. ^ Kashino, Marisa M. (February 1, 2012). "Hey, That’s My Name on the Building". Washingtonian. Retrieved November 28, 2012. 
  7. ^ Balestier, Bruce (January 24, 2001). "Roberts Sheridan Merges With D.C.’s Dickstein Shapiro". New York Law Journal. Retrieved November 28, 2012. 
  8. ^ Post, Ashley (14 January 2013). "Pillsbury, Dickstein end merger talks". Inside Counsel. Retrieved 5 February 2013. 
  9. ^ Glanzer's firm bio
  10. ^ Hastert's firm bio
  11. ^ Cranson, Jeff (February 1, 2011). "Former U.S. Rep. Pete Hoekstra named senior adviser at Washington law and lobbying firm". The Grand Rapids Press. Retrieved February 23, 2011. 
  12. ^ Hutchinson's firm bio
  13. ^ Tydings' firm bio
  14. ^ Wynn's firm bio
  15. ^ Ford's firm bio
  16. ^ Sorkin's firm bio
  17. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s Firm Experience
  18. ^ "firm bio of attorney Barry William Levine". 
  19. ^ Frankel, Alison (2012-06-27). "Supreme Court forces Nike to defend its right not to defend its trademarks". Thomson Reuters. Retrieved 12/7/2012. 

External links[edit]