Dietmar Hamann

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Dietmar Hamann
Hamann, Dietmar.jpg
Hamann in 2011
Personal information
Full name Dietmar Johann Wolfgang Hamann[1]
Date of birth (1973-08-27) 27 August 1973 (age 40)
Place of birth Waldsassen, West Germany
Height 1.91 m (6 ft 3 in)
Playing position Midfielder
Youth career
1978–1989 FC Wacker München
1989–1992 Bayern Munich
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1992–1994 Bayern Munich (A) 24 (8)
1993–1998 Bayern Munich 105 (6)
1998–1999 Newcastle United 23 (4)
1999–2006 Liverpool 191 (8)
2006 Bolton Wanderers 0 (0)
2006–2009 Manchester City 54 (0)
2010–2011 Milton Keynes Dons 12 (0)
Total 409 (26)
National team
1993 Germany U20 3 (0)
1993–1995 Germany U21 10 (2)
1997–2005 Germany 59 (5)
Teams managed
2011 Stockport County
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.
† Appearances (Goals).

Dietmar Johann Wolfgang Hamann (born 27 August 1973), also known as Didi Hamann, is a German former professional footballer who was most recently manager at Stockport County. Throughout his career, he has played for Bayern Munich, Newcastle United, Liverpool, and Manchester City primarily in a defensive midfield position. He also spent time at Milton Keynes Dons as a player/coach before joining Leicester City as a first team coach. He was a member of the German national side from 1997 until 2006. He is known in Ireland as a soccer pundit on RTÉ's live coverage of major European and International competitions.

Throughout his playing career Hamann gained a reputation for being a highly consistent and reliable player. He is highly respected by supporters of Liverpool due in large part to his involvement in the 2005 Champions League Final.

On 5 July 2011, Hamann was named as the new manager of Stockport County, replacing former manager Ray Mathias. He resigned from the post on 7 November 2011 after only four months with Stockport struggling in 17th place in the Conference Premier citing failure of a proposed takeover by Tony Evans.

Club career[edit]

Early career[edit]

Hamann began his career at the little-known FC Wacker München. After impressing as a junior, he joined Bayern Munich as a 16-year old in 1989 and debuted for the Bayern professional team in 1993.[2] Hamann joined a team led by Lothar Matthäus, Thomas Helmer, Christian Ziege and Oliver Kahn and played five games, mostly as a right winger. At first, Hamann was only a so-called Vertragsamateur (i.e. an amateur player who had the license for playing professional games). Still, he won his first German championship as a bench player. In the next season, Bayern suffered a major injury wave which claimed midfielders Matthäus, Swiss international Alain Sutter, talent Dieter Frey and veteran Markus Schupp, which allowed Hamann to become a regular; he played 30 Bundesliga games[2] and established himself as a valuable role player, playing either right wing or defensive midfield. He earned himself a full professional contract and was an important player in the tumultuous 1995–96 campaign, in which Bayern recruited striker Jürgen Klinsmann, coach Otto Rehhagel and midfielders Andreas Herzog, Thomas Strunz and Ciriaco Sforza, but the team was torn apart by heavy internal struggles. Although Hamann was overshadowed by these new midfield recruits, he played in 20 games and provided some stability for the infighting Bayern squad. Bayern ended a disappointing second and saw Rehhagel sacked, but ended the season by winning the UEFA Cup.

The 1996–97 season was to become Hamann's breakthrough. After being a bench player most of his career until then, new coach Giovanni Trappatoni made him a starting defensive midfielder, and new recruit Mario Basler took the right wing. Hamann played in 23 games, also making his debut in the German national team and won his second German championship with Bayern.[2] In private life, Hamann had to overcome a scary period when he broke down unconscious and was diagnosed with a stroke, but made a full recovery.[3] The next season turned out rather disappointing for Bayern who trotted along after newly-promoted 1. FC Kaiserslautern for the vast majority of the season and finished second. Now an undisputed starter, Hamann played in 28 games and scored two goals. The season ended on a high for Bayern when they secured the DFB-Pokal against MSV Duisburg.

Newcastle United[edit]

After playing for his country in the 1998 World Cup, he joined Newcastle United, managed at the time by Kenny Dalglish, for £5.5 million. Overcoming an early foot injury, Hamann played in 31 matches and scored five goals.[2] In July 1999 he opted to join Gerard Houllier's Liverpool, who signed him for £8 million.[4] Whilst at Newcastle he played in the 1999 FA Cup Final.

Liverpool[edit]

Hamann established himself as an influential midfielder for Liverpool throughout his seven years at the club. All in all, Hamann played in 191 league games and scored eight goals. In the 2000–01 season, Hamann won his first big English trophy when Liverpool won a much-celebrated cup treble (League Cup, FA Cup and UEFA Cup) and a place in the Champions League.[5][6]

Hamann established himself as a major first team player for Liverpool throughout his first few seasons there.

Hamann played a major part in the 2005 Champions League Final win over A.C. Milan. Although he was suffering a broken toe during the final,[7] Hamann's substitution for Steve Finnan at half time was the catalyst for Liverpool's historic fightback. The team rallied after being 3–0 down to bring the game back to 3–3 and finally won in the penalty shootout; Hamann also showed a great amount of composure and bravery, as he took and converted the first LFC penalty with his broken foot.[8] This was not the only key part he played in their Champions league success. Earlier in the tournament Hamann had been forced to stand in for Liverpool's key player Steven Gerrard in the first leg of the last 16 round against Bayer Leverkusen. He excelled in the match and scored a late free-kick as Liverpool won the match 3–1.

Hamann won the FA Cup with Liverpool in May 2006, coming on as a substitute in the second-half. He more than played his part in another trophy win for the Reds, who were 3–2 down to West Ham United at the time he came on. Steven Gerrard scored an injury-time leveller for Liverpool to take the match to extra-time. Liverpool would go on to win the Cup on penalties after a goalless extra-time. Once again, Hamann scored the first penalty in the shoot-out.[9]

Hamann has also stated that it would be a "dream come true" to manage Liverpool one day.

Hamann has written a book called The Didi Man about his time at Liverpool. "The Didi Man is Hamann's warm, personal and highly entertaining story of his time on Merseyside at a football club which will always have a very special place in his heart." The book was released 2 February 2012.

Manchester City[edit]

Hamann with Manchester City in 2007

In June 2006, Hamann was given permission to talk to Bolton Wanderers about a potential transfer to the North West club. Hamann admitted that he would be saddened to leave Liverpool but would make "the best decision for my future". Hamann actually signed a pre-contract in June 2006, to become a Bolton Wanderers player but had a "change of heart".[10] He joined Bolton for less than one day before a move to Manchester City.[11]

On 12 July, he instead signed for Manchester City, with City agreeing to pay £400,000 compensation to Bolton.[12] On 13 February, he signed a contract until the end of the 2008–09 season and scored his first goal for the club in a UEFA Cup qualifying first round match against EB/Streymur.[13]

However on the 28 August 2013 during Colin Murray's morning radio show with TalkSport Bolton Wanderers chairman Phil Gartside announced that the club had never officially signed the midfielder and that the necessary papers were "just put in the draw".

On 1 July 2009, he was released by Manchester City as his contract expired.[14] Hamann announced on 16 July that he intended to stay in England.

In July 2009, the Daily Mirror reported that Hamann was in the advanced stages of talks with Championship club Preston North End with a view to joining the club for the 2009–10 season. The Daily Mirror reported on 23 July, that Hamann was "interested in the North End switch despite a rival offer from QPR".[15]

On transfer deadline day in September 2009, BBC Sport quoted Hamann as stating: "Yes, Sven [-Göran Eriksson] phoned me the other day to see if I wanted to sign for Notts County, but I said I wasn't interested at the moment as I feel I can still play at a higher level. There are a couple of things in Germany and I'll make my mind up by the end of the week. I have spoken to a couple of teams in England but that hasn't come to anything yet. Obviously I can still sign after the deadline so maybe if teams don't get the players they want today then I will hear something".[16]

International career[edit]

Hamann played for Germany at under-21 level before making his full international debut in a friendly against South Africa in November 1997. He was selected by manager Berti Vogts for the 1998 FIFA World Cup, being, at almost 25, the second youngest player in an over-aged Germany squad. During the group stage, Hamann drifted in and out of the starting XI, finally breaking into the team when Germany gained momentum in the second round game against Mexico. However, after a quarter-final defeat against Croatia, Germany was out of the tournament.

During the UEFA Euro 2000 qualifying, Hamann established himself as a key player for a transitional Germany side. He played in all of Germany's games at the final tournament as they exited in the first round. Hamann was the last player to score at the old Wembley Stadium before its demolition[17] when he scored the winning goal in Germany's qualifier for the 2002 World Cup against England in October 2000.[18]

Alongside Michael Ballack and Bernd Schneider, Hamann was one of the key players in Germany's surprising run to the 2002 FIFA World Cup Final. He became the third Liverpool player since Roger Hunt in 1966 and Karl-Heinz Riedle in 1990 to play in a World Cup Final, but finished on the losing side as Brazil won 2–0 in Yokohama. In the 67th minute of that match, Hamann lost the ball to opposing forward Ronaldo, who passed to Rivaldo, who shot from outside the area; goalkeeper Oliver Kahn gave a rebound, allowing Ronaldo to score and give Brazil a 1–0 lead. The subsequent Euro 2004 turned out to be Hamann's last tournament. Again, the Euro ended with a disappointing first round exit for Germany. A 1–2 defeat against a Czech Republic side resting its key players proved to be Hamann's penultimate international game.

After a strong performance in the 2005 Champions League final, Hamann was recalled for the Germany squad by new manager Jürgen Klinsmann. In the 2–2 draw against the Netherlands, Hamann produced a lacklustre performance, apparently convincing Klinsmann that he did not possess the required pace for that kind of level anymore. Hamann was dropped from the squad for the subsequent friendlies. Having not been selected for the German squad in the 2006 FIFA World Cup, he decided to officially retire from international football.[19]

Coaching and management career[edit]

Milton Keynes Dons[edit]

Hamann (right) as first team coach of Leicester City, alongside Sven-Göran Eriksson

On 20 May 2010, Hamann signed a one-year contract as a player-coach at Milton Keynes Dons.[20] He left the club on 3 February 2011 to join Leicester City as a First Team Coach.[21]

Stockport County[edit]

On 5 July 2011, Hamann was appointed as the new manager of newly relegated Conference Premier club Stockport County, replacing Ray Mathias.[22] His appointment was made after businessman Tony Evans headed a consortium proposing taking over the club.[23] In his first league game in charge of Stockport, Hamann's side drew 1–1 with Forest Green Rovers at The New Lawn.[24] The match was broadcast live on Premier Sports. Hamann resigned as Stockport County boss on 7 November 2011, citing the failure of the proposed takeover by Tony Evans to materialise; his team were languishing in 17th place having taken only three wins from his nineteen league games in charge.[2][25]

Media career[edit]

Didi Hamann was enlisted by RTÉ Sport for their squad of pundits ahead of the 2010 FIFA World Cup in South Africa.[26][27][28] He returned to RTÉ's team during UEFA Euro 2012.[29][30] He returned to RTÉ's team during the 2014 FIFA World Cup in Brazil.[31]

More recently, in neighbouring Britain, Hamann has guested as a pundit on the BBC's Match of the Day 2. He has also appeared on Sky Sports's football coverage as a pundit, usually when the match involves a club he has played for, most commonly Liverpool, and has also appeared regularly on LFC TV during their live pre-game and post game analysis of Liverpool home games from Anfield Road.

Hamann is also the European columnist for twentyfour7 Football Magazine, where he passes regular comment on the progress and state of the game on the continent.

Personal life[edit]

Hamann has two daughters, Chiara and Luna. He is the brother of Matthias Hamann, who also played in the Bundesliga, mainly for Bayern rival TSV 1860 München. Hamann enjoys cricket and once played for Alderley Edge CC 2nd XI vs Neston CC 2nd XI in the Cheshire County Cricket League,[32] taking a catch in the game. He admitted he became interested in the sport during the 2005 Ashes series.[33][34]

On 23 February 2010, the former German international was found guilty of DUI and sentenced to a 16-month driving ban while also being fined nearly £2 000. He had been stopped by police at junction six of the M56 near his home in Styal, Cheshire, at 12.15 am on 12 July 2009.[35][36]

In cooperation with Standard Chartered bank, an institution for which he also acted as an ambassador, Didi Hamann hosted a football clinic in Nigeria.[37]

Career statistics[edit]

As of 5 July 2011.

Playing career (club)[edit]

Club performance League Cup League Cup Continental Total
Season Club League Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Germany League DFB-Pokal Other Europe Total
1993–94 Bayern Munich Bundesliga 5 1 0 0 - 0 0 6 1
1994–95 30 0 1 0 - 6 0 37 0
1995–96 20 2 2 0 - 7 0 29 2
1996–97 23 1 4 0 - 2 0 30 1
1997–98 28 2 5 3 2 0 8 1 41 6
England League FA Cup League Cup Europe Total
1998–99 Newcastle United Premier League 23 4 7 1 1 0 0 0 31 5
1999–2000 Liverpool Premier League 28 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 30 1
2000–01 30 2 5 1 5 0 13 0 53 3
2001–02 31 1 2 0 1 0 13 0 47 1
2002–03 30 2 1 0 1 0 9 0 41 2
2003–04 25 2 4 0 1 0 5 1 35 3
2004–05 30 0 0 0 3 0 10 1 43 1
2005–06 17 0 2 0 1 0 11 0 31 0
2006–07 Manchester City Premier League 16 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 19 0
2007–08 29 0 3 0 2 0 0 0 34 0
2008–09 9 0 1 0 0 0 8 1 18 1
2010–11 Milton Keynes Dons League One 12 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 13 0
Total Germany 106 6 12 3 2 0 23 1 143 10
England 280 12 29 2 17 0 69 3 396 17
Career total 386 18 41 5 19 0 92 4 538 27

Playing career (international)[edit]

[38][39]

Germany national team
Year Apps Goals
1997 1 1
1998 12 0
1999 6 1
2000 11 1
2001 6 0
2002 12 1
2003 1 0
2004 9 1
2005 1 0
Total 59 5

International goals[edit]

Managerial record[edit]

As of 30 January 2013

Team From To Competition Record
G W D L Win % GF GA GD
Stockport County 5 July 2011[22] 7 November 2011[25] Conference Premier 19 3 10 6 15.79 24 30 −6
FA Cup 1 0 0 1 00.00 0 1 −1
Total 20 3 10 7 15.00 24 31 −7
Career totals League 19 3 10 6 15.79 24 30 −6
Domestic Cup 1 0 0 1 00.00 0 1 −1
Total 20 3 10 7 15.00 24 31 −7

Honours[edit]

Bayern Munich
Liverpool
German national team

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Player search". English National Football Archive. Retrieved 6 June 2014. (registration required (help)). 
  2. ^ a b c d e "Dietmar Hamann" (in German). fussballdaten.de. Retrieved 13 June 2011. 
  3. ^ "Dietmar Hamann erlitt leichten Schlaganfall" (in German). Rhein-Zeitung. 8 April 1997. Retrieved 13 June 2011. 
  4. ^ "Big signings — Seven players arrive in the summer of 1999". LFCHistory.net. Retrieved 1 July 2009. 
  5. ^ "Blues shot down as Liverpool lift cup". BBC Sport. 25 February 2001. Retrieved 1 July 2009. 
  6. ^ "Uefa Cup final clockwatch". BBC Sport. 16 May 2001. Retrieved 1 July 2009. 
  7. ^ Woo, Alex (May 2005). "Dietmar Hamann 1999–2006". The Liverpool Way. Retrieved 13 June 2011. 
  8. ^ "AC Milan 3–3 Liverpool (aet)". BBC Sport. 25 May 2005. Retrieved 1 July 2009. 
  9. ^ "Liverpool 3–3 West Ham (aet) Liverpool win 3–1 on penalties". BBC Sport. 13 May 2006. Retrieved 1 July 2009. 
  10. ^ "Didi U-Turn". Bolton Wanderers F.C. 11 July 2006. Retrieved 13 June 2011. 
  11. ^ "Allardyce upset by Hamann choice". BBC Sport. 13 July 2006. Retrieved 1 July 2009. 
  12. ^ "Hamann makes switch to Man City". BBC Sport. 12 July 2006. Retrieved 1 July 2009. 
  13. ^ "EB Streymur 0–2 Man City". BBC. 17 July 2008. Retrieved 9 November 2009. 
  14. ^ "Man City allow quartet to leave". BBC Sport. 1 July 2009. Retrieved 1 July 2009. 
  15. ^ "Preston North End chasing Didi Hamann". mirror.co.uk. 23 July 2009. Retrieved 13 June 2011. 
  16. ^ Stevenson, Jonathan (1 September 2009). "Transfer deadline day as it happened". BBC Sport. Retrieved 13 June 2011. 
  17. ^ Hamann, Dietmar (1 June 2007). "Wembley milestone". BBC Sport. Retrieved 1 July 2009. 
  18. ^ "Wembley's sad farewell". BBC Sport. 7 October 2000. Retrieved 1 July 2009. 
  19. ^ "Hamann leaves international scene". CNN.com. 20 May 2006. Retrieved 1 July 2009. 
  20. ^ "MK Dons sign Dietmar Hamann as player-coach". BBC Sport. 20 May 2010. Retrieved 20 May 2010. 
  21. ^ "Leicester City recruit MK Dos coach Dietmar Hamann". BBC Sport. 3 February 2011. Retrieved 13 June 2011. 
  22. ^ a b "Dietmar Hamann takes over as Stockport County boss". BBC. 5 July 2011. Retrieved 30 January 2013. 
  23. ^ "Dietmar Hamann is new County Manager". stockportcounty.com. 5 July 2011. Retrieved 10 February 2012. 
  24. ^ "Forest Green Rovers 1–1 Stockport County". BBC Sport. 12 August 2011. Retrieved 13 August 2011. 
  25. ^ a b "Hamann explained leaving Stockport County". BBC. 20 January 2012. Retrieved 20 January 2012. 
  26. ^ "Ardiles and Hamann join RTÉ for World Cup". RTÉ Sport (RTÉ). 1 June 2010. Retrieved 1 June 2010. 
  27. ^ Black, Fergus (2 June 2010). "RTÉ hopes Ossie and squad will spur fans to back home team". Irish Independent. Retrieved 2 June 2010. 
  28. ^ O'Malley, Carl (2 June 2010). "RTÉ roll out big guns for their 56 live games". The Irish Times. Retrieved 2 June 2010. 
  29. ^ Hannigan, Mary (13 June 2012). "Play McClean, Trap – ah go on, go on, go on". The Irish Times. Retrieved 13 June 2012. "“I think it's bullshit: self-serving bullshit,” said Eamon Dunphy of Giovanni Trapattoni's suggestion that the team (his players, not the RTÉ panel) needed to seek a bit of “redemption” against Spain. “Yeah,” said Kenny Cunningham. Didi Hamann, sandwiched between the pair, observed the exchange like he might a tennis rally." 
  30. ^ Byrne, Luke (18 May 2012). "RTÉ on the ball to broadcast all 31 Euro matches". Irish Independent. Retrieved 18 May 2012. "According to the broadcaster some international faces will return to bring colour to the matches including former German international Didi Hamann – who was a pundit during the 2010 World Cup." 
  31. ^ "Friedel, Ardiles & Lennon join RTÉ for World Cup". RTÉ Sport (RTÉ). 5 June 2014. Retrieved 5 June 2014. "Joining them will be former German international Didi Hamann, Argentine World Cup winner Ossie Ardiles, former Celtic manager Neil Lennon, ex-USA international Brad Friedel and Real Madrid coach Paul Clement." 
  32. ^ Hamann, Dietmar. "Scorecard". Retrieved 26 July 2011. 
  33. ^ "Dietmar Hamann: Man for all seasons". The Independent (London). 14 October 2006. Retrieved 1 July 2009. 
  34. ^ Mountford, Adam (31 August 2007). "Football star gripped by cricket". BBC. Retrieved 13 June 2011. 
  35. ^ Cole, Rob (23 February 2010). "Ex-Soccer Star Is Banned From Driving". Sky News. Retrieved 13 June 2011. 
  36. ^ "Hamann guilty of drink driving". BBC News. 23 February 2010. Retrieved 1 May 2010. 
  37. ^ "Dietmar Hamann confesses to losing £200,000 in a day". BBC Sport. 6 February 2012. Retrieved 10 February 2012. 
  38. ^ Dietmar Hamann at National-Football-Teams.com
  39. ^ "Dietmar Hamann – International Appearances". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 13 June 2011. 

External links[edit]