Dietrichstein

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Coat of arms of the house of Dietrichstein

Dietrichstein was the name of a Bohemian and Austrian noble family.

Schloss Hollenburg, Carinthia, Austria
Mikulov Castle (Nikolsburg), Moravia, Czech Republic

Maximilian von Dietrichstein was created Graf (Count) von Dietrichstein on 18 September 1612 and his uncle Franz Seraph was elevated as Fürst (Prince) von Dietrichstein zu Nikolsburg on 1624. Nikolsburg is now known as Mikulov.

  1. Franz Seraph (1570–1636), Prince of Dietrichstein, Bishop of Olomouc, Cardinal and Landeshauptmann of Moravia.[1]
  2. Maximilian, Prince of Dietrichstein (1596–1655)
  3. Ferdinand Joseph, Prince of Dietrichstein (1628/1636-1698), son of the last
  4. Leopold Ignaz Joseph, Prince of Dietrichstein (1660–1708), son of the last
  5. Walther Franz Xaver Anton, Prince of Dietrichstein (1664–1738), brother of the last
  6. Karl Maximilian Philipp Franz Xaver, Prince of Dietrichstein (1702–1784), son of the last
  7. Karl Johann Baptist Walter Sigismund Ernest Nepomuk Alois, Prince of Dietrichstein (1728–1808), son of the last
  8. Franz Seraph Joseph Carl Johann Nepomuc Quirin, Prince of Dietrichstein (1767–1854), son of the last
  9. Joseph Franz, Prince of Dietrichstein (1798–1858), son of the last
  10. Moritz Johann Nepomuk, Prince of Dietrichstein (1775–1864), son of Prince Karl Johann.

In 1857, Alexandrine, daughter of Prince Joseph Franz, married Count Alexander von Mensdorff-Pouilly. He served as Foreign Minister and briefly Minister-President of Austria in the 1860s, and in 1868 was created Fürst von Dietrichstein zu Nikolsburg, reviving the title held by his wife's family.

  1. Alexander Constantin, Prince of Dietrichstein (1813–1871)
  2. Hugo Alfons Eduard Emanuel Joseph Johann Wenzeslaus, Prince of Dietrichstein (1858–1920), son of the last
  3. Alexander Albert Olivier Anton, Prince of Dietrichstein (1899–1964), son of the last.

The diplomat Count Albert von Mensdorff-Pouilly-Dietrichstein was a younger son of Prince Alexander Constantin.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Allgemeine deutsche Biographie & Neue deutsche Biographie (Digitale Register)