Digimon World 2

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Digimon World 2
Digimonworld2.jpg
Developer(s) Bandai
Publisher(s) Bandai
Fox Kids
Series Digimon
Platform(s) PlayStation
Release date(s)
  • JP July 27, 2000
  • NA May 19, 2001
Genre(s) Role-playing video game
Distribution 1 CD-ROM

Digimon World 2 (デジモンワールド2 Dejimon Wārudo Tsu?) is a dungeon crawler game developed and published by Bandai. The player controls Akira, a Digimon Tamer whose goal is to climb to the top of the Digimon World.

Plot[edit]

Akira lives in Digital City, a town located in fictional "Directory Continent", a land where digimon used to live peacefully. However, wild Digimon began attacking Akira's hometown, and Akira joins a guard team that is charged with protection peace and security of the region.

At the start of the game, Akira finishes his last Training Mission and joins one of the Guard Teams (the player has the option of choosing between the Black Sword Team, the Gold Hawks team, or the Blue Falcon team). He receives missions from the Team Leader, which involve entering Domains and hunting down evil Digimon.

Gameplay[edit]

The player battles with three Digimon: "Rosemon", WarGreymon, and SkullGreymon. The opponent's Digimon are Ninjamon, Centarumon, and SandYanmamon.

Because it is a dungeon crawler, Digimon World 2 has vastly different gameplay from its predecessor, Digimon World, which focused on raising Digimon like pets. The player explores vast labyrinths dubbed "Domains", inside a tank called a "Digi-Beetle" (Akira's Digi-Beetle has the default name of "Gunner", though like Akira himself, the player has the option of naming the vehicle, which can receive various upgrades throughout the game). These dungeons are filled with various things, including many types of traps including land mines, energy fields called "Electro-Spores", giant stones, acid floors, treasure chests, and most importantly, enemy Digimon.

Most traps can be disposed of by items that can be purchased at stores found across the game, and enemy Digimon can be befriended with "gift" items. However, the Digi-Beetle has a limited inventory, requiring careful management of items.

Typically, at the end of each Domain there is a Boss, whether it be a lone Digimon, or another Tamer with a team of them. After defeating the Boss, the player may exit the Domain by means of an "Exit Portal" found near the Boss' location.

Digivolving[edit]

Digivolving is one of the game's most interesting and difficult parts to understand. Digivolving is the process in which a Digimon "evolves" into a new level. A Rookie Digimon will always Digivolve into a Champion level, a Champion level will always Digivolve into an Ultimate level, and an Ultimate level will (almost) always Digivolve to a Mega level (some Ultimates don't digivolve). However, a Digimon's Digivolultion is affected by how many Digivolving points it has.

Digivolving points[edit]

DP is the most important factor of Digivolution. DP is gained by DNA-Digivolving your Digimon. Every time you DNA-Digivolve, extra DP is awarded, but care must be taken not to do this too often, as it may cause Digimon to not evolve. DP will cause Digimon to Digivolve into different forms. Sometimes, if a high DP number is reached, the player will obtain a rare and powerful Digimon.

What a digimon digivolves into is affected by its Digivolve Points. Players can only see a digimon's DP when visiting the Digivolve Lab and clicking on a particular digimon. A digimon's DP will increase by 1 from the digimon with the highest DP whenever you DNA Digivolve it. Players can increase DP by using DNA UpChip and decrease DP by using DNA DnChip..

Digivolution Formula[edit]

To determine the maximum level a digimon can reach, one must use the formula x+(y/5). X being the level of the higher digimon and y being the level of the lower level digimon. Adding them merely refers to Dna digivolution. For example, the first digimon has a level of 18 and the second digimon has a level of 14. 18+(14/5) would be the formula which would make it 20.8, which would round to 20. (The level is always rounded down in this case.)

Damage Formula[edit]

The damage formula used in the game is as follows: Floor(Floor(Type Bonus * Specialty Bonus * Attack Power * Tile Bonus) * Attack / Floor(Defense * Tile Bonus)) = Damage (Floor means to drop all decimal places). Type bonus is either 0.8, 1.0, or 1.2 based upon the Virus -> Data -> Vaccine triangle. (i.e. Virus attacks a Data, the bonus is 1.2) Specialty bonus can be 0.8, 1.0, or 1.2 and is the specialty of the skill vs. the specialty of the target digimon. (i.e. A Water move would be 1.2 against a Fire digimon). Attack Power is the attack power of the move. For example, Terra Force is 60, Bolt Strike is 10, and Energy Blast is 37.5. Tile Bonus can be 0.8, 1.0, or 1.2 and is the bonus applied to the specialty of the move. If you are on a Darkness tile and use Grisly Wing, it would become 1.2. The Attack is the attack stat of the attacking digimon. The Defense is the defense stat of the defending digimon. The Tile Bonus can be 0.8, 1.0, or 1.2 and is the bonus applied to the specialty of the digimon. If the defender has a Fire specialty and is on a Fire tile, the value becomes 1.2.

Development[edit]

Digimon World 2 was announced in conjunction with Digimon World in May 1997, before either's release.[1]

Reception[edit]

The game was met with mixed reception.The game received a 4.0 from IGN, stating that, "The battles and dungeons have very lackluster graphics" and "essentially a dull dungeon crawl"

Reception
Aggregate scores
Aggregator Score
GameRankings 51.72%[3]
Metacritic 42%[5]
Review scores
Publication Score
Electronic Gaming Monthly 28%[2]
IGN 4/10[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Shoemaker, Brad (May 20, 1997). "Digimon World Hands-On". GameSpot. Retrieved May 19, 2010. 
  2. ^ Electronic Gaming Monthly (145): 112. August 2001. 
  3. ^ "Digimon World 2". Game Rankings. Retrieved May 19, 2010. 
  4. ^ Smith, David (May 4, 1998). "Digimon World 2". IGN. Retrieved May 19, 2010. 
  5. ^ "Digimon World 2". Metacritic. Retrieved May 19, 2010.