Digitally Imported

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Digitally Imported, Inc.
Type Corporation
Industry Internet radio
Founded 1999
Headquarters Denver, CO
Key people Ari Shohat, Founder & CEO
Website http://www.di.fm/

Digitally Imported (DI or DI Radio) is an Internet radio broadcaster playing various types of electronic dance music including trance, progressive, techno, eurodance and house across 78 hand curated channels.[1][2] It was founded in December 1999 as a hobby project by Ari Shohat in his Binghamton University dorm room and was one of the first Internet radio stations.[3][4][5][6] It has often been listed as one of the top electronic dance music radio stations online[7][8][9][10][11][12] and was awarded Best Global Radio Station at the International Dance Music Awards in March 2010.[13] It also offers streaming radio services of other, non-electronic dance music genres  — such as pop hits, jazz and rock — across 245 channels through its sister networks, SKY.FM,[14] JAZZRADIO,[15] ROCKRADIO[16] and Fresca Radio.[17]

Digitally Imported participated in Day of Silence protests against high royalty fees for Internet radio in 2002 and 2007.[18][19] In July 2009, Digitally Imported, radioIO and AccuRadio reached a revenue-sharing deal with royalty collector SoundExchange securing music rights.[20][21][22]

Due to licensing issues in the United Kingdom, listeners require an account using an e-mail address and password. This is free to set up, although charges still apply for the premium service.

Streaming formats[edit]

Streams for free:

Premium streams (US$7 per month/US$70 per year), without any commercial interruptions:

Awards[edit]

  • International Dance Music Awards (IDMA) - Best Radio Station (Global) [Nominated: 2004, 2006, 2007, 2009, Winner: 2010, Nominated: 2011, 2012]
  • International Dance Music Awards (IDMA) - Best Music App [Winner: 2011, Nominated: 2012]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "DI website". 
  2. ^ "Digitally Imported". Synthtopia. December 25, 2003. Retrieved 2009-10-21. 
  3. ^ Delahunty, James; "Tyler" (submitter) (February 8, 2005). "A brief look at di.fm - Digitally Imported Radio". afterdawn.com. Retrieved 2009-10-21. 
  4. ^ "Electronic Music Fans Donate To Largest Web-Radio Site". Synthtopia. January 31, 2005. Retrieved 2009-10-21. 
  5. ^ Daily, Geoff (March 30, 2005). "Case Study: Electronica Finds a Voice at DI.fm". streamingmedia.com. Retrieved 2009-10-21. 
  6. ^ "A Case Study In Managed Growth:Digitally Imported Radio". streamingmedia.com. February 1, 2003. Retrieved 2009-10-21. 
  7. ^ "Webcast Metrics Audience Rankings". Internet Radio Top 20. Ando Media. April 23, 2009. Retrieved 2009-10-21. 
  8. ^ "CBS Radio, Clear Channel Top April Webcast Ratings". Radio Ink. May 28, 2009. Retrieved 2009-10-21. 
  9. ^ Norr, Henry (January 27, 2003). "Radio reaches digital age". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved 2009-10-21. 
  10. ^ Deitz, Corey (January 26, 2005). "Digitally Imported Radio Spawns Cult-Like Following of Volunteers and Listeners". About.com. Retrieved 2009-10-21. 
  11. ^ "Digitally Imported Radio: Increased bandwidth, no expensive infrastructure". Publish.com. May 1, 2003. Retrieved 2009-10-21. 
  12. ^ Hughlett, Mike (March 8, 2007). "Web radio fears going bust: The battle over royalties paid by Internet broadcasters is hardly new, but the stakes have never been higher.". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 2009-10-21. 
  13. ^ "IDMA Nominees and Winners 2010". March 29, 2010. Retrieved 2010-04-07. 
  14. ^ "SKY.FM website". 
  15. ^ "JAZZRADIO website". 
  16. ^ "ROCKRADIO website". 
  17. ^ "Fresca Radio website". 
  18. ^ Searls, Doc (May 1, 2002). "Silent Mayday". Linux Journal. Retrieved 2009-10-21. 
  19. ^ "Radio Silence". Broadband Reports. June 26, 2007. Retrieved 2009-10-21. 
  20. ^ "Online Radio Stations Strike Big Deal on Royalties". Fox News. AP. July 8, 2009. Retrieved 2009-10-21. 
  21. ^ Puzzanghera, Jim (July 8, 2009). "Internet radio sites, music industry reach agreement over royalties". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2009-10-21. [dead link]
  22. ^ Van Buskirk, Eliot (July 13, 2007). "Listening Post Just another WordPress weblog Webcaster’s Worry: What Happens After 2010?". Listening Post blog (Wired). Retrieved 2009-10-21. 

External links[edit]