Dim Effect

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The Dim Effect is a natural phenomenon named by Brett C. Ratcliffe in which nature is said to "mimic" art.[1] The Dim Effect occurs when the following events occur in sequence:

  1. An element of nature never seen before and assumed not to exist is represented synthetically.
  2. The same element is discovered to actually exist in nature entirely without human intervention.

The Dim Effect is named after a 3-D animated character Dim, the rhinoceros beetle from A Bug's Life.[1]

Examples[edit]

Synthetic element Date of synthesis Date of discovery Natural Element
The horn structure on Dim from A Bug's Life, clearly not modeled after any rhinoceros beetle known at that time to exist.[1] 1998 2006 Megaceras briansaltini[1]
The concept of a saber-toothed squirrel, represented by Scrat in Ice Age. According to director Chris Wedge, artist Peter de Seve came up with the design for Scrat after a visit to the Museum of Natural History[disambiguation needed]. Wedge called it "sort of a squirrel based on some lemur."[2] 2002 2011 Cronopio dentiacutus, a dryolestoid that highly resembled the saber-toothed squirrel[3][4]
The velociraptors in the movie Jurassic Park (which were actually based on Deinonychus) were larger than any dromaeosaurid known at the time.[5] 1992 1993 Utahraptor ostrommaysorum[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Ratcliffe, B.C. (2007). "A remarkable new species of Megaceras from Peru (Scarabaeidae: Dynastinae: Oryctini). The "Dim Effect": Nature mimicking art". The Coleopterists Bulletin 61 (3): 463–7.  As cited in Ratcliffe, B.C. (2007-01-01). "A remarkable new species of Megaceras from Peru (Scarabaeidae: Dynastinae: Oryctini). The "Dim Effect": Nature mimicking art". 
  2. ^ Wloszczyna, Susan (15 March 2002). "Scrounging, screeching Scrat is nutty hit of 'Ice Age'". USA Today. Retrieved 2 January 2011. 
  3. ^ Guillermo W. Rougier, Sebastián Apesteguía and Leandro C. Gaetano (2011). "Highly specialized mammalian skulls from the Late Cretaceous of South America". Nature 479: 98–102. doi:10.1038/nature10591.  Supplementary information
  4. ^ Chew, Kristina (4 November 2011). "Saber-Toothed Squirrel Skulls Found: Lived 100 Million Years Ago". Retrieved 6 November 2011. 
  5. ^ a b http://blogs.smithsonianmag.com/dinosaur/2011/02/what-do-we-really-know-about-utahraptor/