Dimethoxyamphetamine

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Dimethoxyamphetamine
2,4-DMA.png
DMA-3d-sticks.png
Identifiers
PubChem 91255
ChemSpider 82404 YesY
ChEMBL CHEMBL280855 YesY
Jmol-3D images Image 1
Image 2
Properties
Molecular formula C11H17NO2
Molar mass 195.26 g/mol
Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C (77 °F), 100 kPa)
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Infobox references

DMA, or dimethoxyamphetamine, is a series of lesser-known psychedelic drugs similar in structure to amphetamine and to trimethoxyamphetamine (TMA). They were first synthesized by Alexander Shulgin and written up in his book PiHKAL (Phenethylamines I Have Known And Loved).[1] Very little data is known about their dangers or toxicity.

Positional isomers[edit]

2,4-DMA[edit]

2,4-DMA, or 2,4-dimethoxy-amphetamine


Dosage: 60 mg or greater

Duration: short

Effects: stimulative, amphetamine-like effects

2,5-DMA[edit]

2,5-DMA, or 2,5-dimethoxy-amphetamine


The DO analogue of 2C-H (DOH)

CAS Number: 2801-68-5

Dosage: 80–160 mg[2]

Duration: 6–8 hours

Effects: Mydriasis, increase in heart rate

3,4-DMA[edit]

3,4-DMA, or 3,4-dimethoxy-amphetamine


Dosage: unknown

Duration: unknown

Effects: Mescaline-like visuals

Note that two other positional isomers of dimethoxyamphetamine, 2,6-DMA and 3,5-DMA, have also been made, but these drugs have not been tested in humans and their effects are unknown. However, it is likely that these compounds would also produce amphetamine-like stimulation or possibly hallucinogenic effects.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Shulgin, Alexander; Ann Shulgin (September 1991). PiHKAL: A Chemical Love Story. Berkeley, California: Transform Press. ISBN 0-9630096-0-5. OCLC 25627628. 
  2. ^ "PiHKAL". isomerdesign.com. Retrieved 2012-03-17. 

External links[edit]