Ding Mao

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Ding Mao (Chinese: 丁矛), born 1968 in Sichuan (Chinese: 四川) Mianyang (Chinese: 绵阳), is a Chinese dissident. As a student, he was one of the leaders of the student democracy movement, known through the Tiananmen Square 1989 protest.[1] He became general manager of an investment company, and one of the founders of the unrecognized Social Democratic Party. Mao was recently detained on 19 February 2011,[2][3] and held at Mianyang Municipal Detention Center[4] before being released into residential surveillance on 2 December 2011.[5]

Biography[edit]

Ding Mao was a philosophy student at Lanzhou University in the late 1980s. There he became a student leader of the 1989 pro-democracy protests.[2] He was twice imprisoned for his activism, first in 1989 and again in 1992 when he was arrested for organizing the Social Democratic Party. He has spent a total of 10 years in jail.[4]

Detention during Jasmine Crackdown[edit]

On 19 February 2011, Mao was detained in Chengdu, Sichuan Province by police on "inciting subversion of state power".[2][4] He was held at Mianyang Municipal Detention Centre for 286 days before being released into residential supervision.[5]

Police in Mianyang City had blocked meetings between Ding and a lawyer hired for him by his family because, claiming that Ding’s case "involved state secrets".[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "China: More than 200 arrests to quell the "jasmine revolution" in China". AsiaNews. 2 April 2011. Retrieved 13 April 2011. 
  2. ^ a b c "China: More than 200 arrests to quell the "jasmine revolution" in China". AFP / New York Daily Post. 29 March 2011. 
  3. ^ "China arrests dissident in crackdown, human rights group says". CNN. 13 April 2011. Retrieved 19 April 2011. 
  4. ^ a b c d "Individuals Affected by the Crackdown Following Call for "Jasmine Revolution"". Chinese Human Rights Defenders. 15 April 2011. Retrieved 16 April 2011. 
  5. ^ a b Qiao Long and Luisetta Mudie, Activist Released 'Under Surveillance', Radio Free Asia, 2 December 2011.