Dino Rondani

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Dino Rondani (b. 1868, Sogliano al Rubicone, d. 1951, Nice[1]) was an Italian socialist politician, lawyer and parliamentarian.[2] He was also the National Secretary of the Cooperative League. He was a member of parliament representing Cossato until 1914.[1]

In 1898, he was sentenced to jail for his role in Fatti di Maggio. He was given an amnesty,[1] and In 1899 he was appointed by the Italian Socialist Party to move to the United States and serve as the editor of Il Proletario (an Italian-language socialist publication) there. Rondani had written ten articles for Il Proletario since 1898.[3][4] When he arrived, he stepped right into a conflictive situation amongst the Italian-American socialists (largely caused by differences of opinion regarding Daniel DeLeon's leadership of the Socialist Labor Party). Rondani tried to renconcile revolutionary and reformist sectors of Italian-American socialists.[5]

However he was called back to Italy soon after his arrival in America, returning in 1900, as he was nominated as a candidate in parliamentary elections.[3]-

In late 1902, he again visited the Americas, on a speaking tour in Argentina and the United States. In Argentina, local socialists organized various propaganda events with him as a speaker. They also organized debates with anarchists. In the U.S., Rondani visited Patterson.[6]

He represented Novara in the Italian parliament between 1919 and 1921.[1]

Rondani represented the Socialist Party of Argentina in the Bureau of the Labour and Socialist International between 1934 and 1940.[7]

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References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Palma, Paolo. Una bomba per il duce: la centrale antifascista di Pacciardi a Lugano ; (1927 - 1933). Problemi aperti, 69. Soveria Mannelli (Catanzaro): Rubbettino, 2003. pp. 21-22
  2. ^ Michels, Robert. Il proletariato e la borghesia nel movimento socialista italiano. European sociology. New York: Arno Press, 1975. p. 95
  3. ^ a b Hoerder, Dirk, and Christiane Harzig. The Immigrant Labor Press in North America, 1840s-1970s: An Annotated Bibliography. Bibliographies and indexes in American history, no. 4, 7-8. New York: Greenwood Press, 1987. p. 33
  4. ^ Topp, Michael Miller. Those Without a Country: The Political Culture of Italian American Syndicalists. Critical American studies series. Minneapolis, Minn. [u.a.]: University of Minnesota Press, 2001. p. 32
  5. ^ Topp, Michael Miller. Those Without a Country: The Political Culture of Italian American Syndicalists. Critical American studies series. Minneapolis, Minn. [u.a.]: University of Minnesota Press, 2001. p. 42
  6. ^ Zaragoza Rovira, Gonzalo. Anarquismo argentino, 1876-1902. Madrid: De la Torre, 1996. p. 340
  7. ^ Kowalski, Werner. Geschichte der sozialistischen arbeiter-internationale: 1923 - 19. Berlin: Dt. Verl. d. Wissenschaften, 1985. p. 282