Dioxirane

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Not to be confused with Dioxane. ‹See Tfd›
Dioxirane
Dioxirane.svg Dioxirane-stick.png
Dioxirane3D.png
Identifiers
CAS number 157-26-6 YesY
PubChem 449520
ChemSpider 396025 N
Jmol-3D images Image 1
Properties
Molecular formula CH2O2
Molar mass 46.03 g/mol
Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C (77 °F), 100 kPa)
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Infobox references

A dioxirane is a molecule containing a three-membered ring composed of one carbon and two oxygens. Somewhat unstable, they are used in organic synthesis as oxidizing reagents.[1] A dioxirane in common use is dimethyldioxirane (DMDO), the dioxirane derived from acetone.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ruggero Curci, Anna Dinoi, and Maria F. Rubino (1995). "Dioxirane oxidations: Taming the reactivity-selectivity principle". Pure & Appl. Chem. 67 (5): 811–822. doi:10.1351/pac199567050811.