Discovery Kids on NBC

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Discovery Kids on NBC
Country United States
Availability National
Launch date
September 14, 2002 (2002-09-14)
Dissolved September 2, 2006 (2006-09-02)

Discovery Kids on NBC was a three-hour Saturday morning television children's programming block that was broadcast by NBC from September 14, 2002 to September 2, 2006. The block featured programming from the Discovery Kids cable network, and all of its programming met the FCC's "E/I" requirements.[1] The block regularly aired on Saturday mornings, though certain programs within the lineup aired on Sundays in some parts of the country due to carriage of local programming by certain stations affiliated with the network or scheduling issues with regional or network sports broadcasts. The block was replaced on September 6, 2006 with the Qubo block.

History[edit]

In 1992, riding off the success of its teen sitcom Saved by the Bell, NBC phased out animated programming from its Saturday morning lineup and re-branded it as TNBC, consisting purely of live-action series aimed at a teenage audience.[2] However, by 2001, the block had suffered from declining viewership (and, ironically, a median viewer age of 41).[3]

In December 2001, NBC began a partnership with Discovery Communications, in which its cable channel Discovery Kids would produce a new Saturday morning block for the network. The new block would feature programming that meets the FCC's educational programming guidelines, including new original series (such as the reality television series Endurance), existing Discovery Kids programming, along with children's spin-offs of programs from sister networks, such as Trading Spaces: Boys vs. Girls—a spin-off of the TLC home renovation reality show.[4] The block would later feature educationally-oriented animated programming under the banner "Real Toons", such as Kenny the Shark and Tutenstein.[5][6]

The new block came amidst growing synergies between broadcast and cable television in regards to children's programming; CBS had recently launched a Nickelodeon-branded block, ABC would also launch ABC Kids that same month—featuring programming from its cable networks such as Disney Channel and Toon Disney, and Kids' WB had increasingly cross-promoted itself with Cartoon Network.[7][8]

Transition to Qubo[edit]

In March 2006, Discovery declined to renew its contract with NBC for its Saturday morning block, citing a desire to focus exclusively on the Discovery Kids cable channel;[9] in May 2006, NBC and Ion Media Networks unveiled a joint venture with Corus Entertainment, Scholastic, and Classic Media known as Qubo, which would aim to provide educational programming aimed at children between 4 to 8 years of age. The new Qubo block would replace Discovery Kids on NBC in September 2006.[10][11]

Programming[edit]

"Real Toons" (animated series)[edit]

Live-action series[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bernstein, Paula (December 4, 2001). "Discovery set to kid around with Peacock". Variety. Retrieved 2009-08-13. 
  2. ^ "Discovery set to kid around with Peacock". Variety. Retrieved 24 September 2014. 
  3. ^ "Adults ‘Discover’ kiddie programs". Variety. Retrieved 24 September 2014. 
  4. ^ Oei, Lily (April 2, 2002). "Discovery Kids sets NBC sked". Variety. Retrieved September 23, 2014. 
  5. ^ Oei, Lily; McClintock, Pamela (November 6, 2003). "Kids mixed on new skeds". Variety. Retrieved September 23, 2014. 
  6. ^ Oei, Lily (August 24, 2003). "Nets face back to school blues". Variety. Retrieved September 23, 2014. 
  7. ^ Bernstein, Paula (September 29, 2002). "Kid skeds tread on joint strategy". Variety. Retrieved September 23, 2014. 
  8. ^ Umstead, Thomas (December 7, 2001). "Discovery Gets NBC Kids' Block". Multichannel News. Retrieved September 23, 2014. 
  9. ^ Riddell, Robert (March 19, 2006). "Discovery Kids parts with NBC". Variety. Retrieved September 23, 2014. 
  10. ^ Hampp, Andrew (August 24, 2006). "NBC Debuts Kids Programming Brand Qubo". Ad Age. Retrieved February 14, 2014. 
  11. ^ Clemens, Luis. "Qubo’s Rodriguez: Offering a 'Building Block’ to Kids". Multichannel News. Retrieved 23 September 2014.