Dispersit

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Dispersit SPC 1000 or Dispersit is a dispersant used for oil spills, produced by U.S. Polychemical Corporation.[1]

Composition[edit]

It combines a predominately oil-soluble surfactant (such as polyethylene glycol mono-oleate) with a predominately water-soluble surfactant (such as cocoamide) and a co-solvent for coupling a mixture of the predominately oil-soluble surfactant and the oil.[2]

Schematic illustration of an oil droplet being emulsified by Dispersit

Alternatives[edit]

Alternative dispersants which are approved by the EPA are listed on the National Contingency Plan Product Schedule[3] and rated for their toxicity and effectiveness.[4]

Deployments[edit]

2010 Gulf of Mexico oil spill[edit]

Dispersit is unique among U.S. Environmental Protection Agency-rated dispersants in being the only one rated as 100% effective against South Louisiana crude oil, and it is among the least toxic, according to EPA tests.[5] By comparison, Corexit, the oil dispersant used in the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, is rated at 54.7% effective against South Louisiana crude oil and three times as lethal to silverfish and more than twice as lethal to shrimp.[6]

On May 20, US Polychemical Corporation was reported to have received an order from BP for Dispersit SPC 1000.[7] US Polychemical reportedly stated it was able to produce 20,000 US gallons (76,000 l) a day in the first few days and increasing up to 60,000 US gallons (230,000 l) a day thereafter.[8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Polychem Dispersit". U.S. Polychemical Corporation. Retrieved 2010-05-21. 
  2. ^ US patent 6261463, Savarimuthu M. Jacob and Robert E. Bergman & Robert E. Bergman, "Water based oil dispersant", published 2002-01-17, issued 2001-07-17, assigned to U.S. Polychemical Marine Corporation 
  3. ^ "National Contingency Plan Product Schedule". Environmental Protection Agency. 2010-05-13. Retrieved 2010-05-21. 
  4. ^ "National Contingency Plan Product Schedule Toxicity and Effectiveness Summaries". Environmental Protection Agency. 2010-05-13. Retrieved 2010-05-21. 
  5. ^ "National Contingency Plan Product Schedule Toxicity and Effectiveness Summaries". Environmental Protection Agency. 2010-05-13. Retrieved 2010-05-21. 
  6. ^ Brandon Keim (2010-05-05). "Toxic Oil Dispersant Used in Gulf Despite Better Alternative". Wired. Retrieved 2010-05-21. 
  7. ^ "National Contingency Plan Product Schedule, Technical Product Bulletin #D-5: DISPERSIT SPC 1000". Environmental Protection Agency. 1999-04-22. Retrieved 2010-05-21. 
  8. ^ Campbell Robertson and Elisabeth Rosenthal (2010-05-20). "Agency Orders Use of a Less Toxic Chemical in Gulf". New York Times. Retrieved 2010-05-21.