District of Columbia statistical areas

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The statistical areas of the United States of America comprise the metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs),[1] the micropolitan statistical areas (μSAs),[2] and the combined statistical areas (CSAs)[3] currently defined by the United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB).

Most recently on December 1, 2009, the Office of Management and Budget defined 1067 statistical areas for the United States,[4] including a combined statistical area and a metropolitan statistical area in the District of Columbia. The district has no counties or other legal subdivisions. The table below shows the recent population of these statistical areas.

An enlargeable map of the Washington-Baltimore-Northern Virginia, DC-MD-VA-WV Combined Statistical Area

Table[edit]

The table below describes the two United States statistical areas of the District of Columbia with the following information:[5]

  1. The combined statistical area (CSA) as designated by the OMB.[4]
  2. The CSA population as of April 1, 2010, as enumerated by the 2010 United States Census.[6]
  3. The core based statistical area (CBSA)[7] as designated by the OMB.[4]
  4. The CBSA population as of April 1, 2010, as enumerated by the 2010 United States Census.[6]
  5. The federal district, county, or independent city.[6]
  6. The federal district, county, or independent city population as of April 1, 2010, as enumerated by the 2010 United States Census.[6]
The two United States statistical areas of the District of Columbia

Combined Statistical Area 2010 Census Core Based Statistical Area 2010 Census County 2010 Census
Washington-Baltimore-Northern Virginia, DC-MD-VA-WV CSA 8,572,971
601,723
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, DC-VA-MD-WV MSA 5,582,170
601,723
Fairfax County, Virginia 1,081,726
Montgomery County, Maryland 971,777
Prince George's County, Maryland 863,420
District of Columbia 601,723
Prince William County, Virginia 402,002
Loudoun County, Virginia 312,311
Frederick County, Maryland 233,385
Arlington County, Virginia 207,627
Charles County, Maryland 146,551
City of Alexandria, Virginia 139,966
Stafford County, Virginia 128,961
Spotsylvania County, Virginia 122,397
Calvert County, Maryland 88,737
Fauquier County, Virginia 65,203
Jefferson County, West Virginia 53,498
City of Manassas, Virginia 37,821
Warren County, Virginia 37,575
City of Fredericksburg, Virginia 24,286
City of Fairfax, Virginia 22,565
City of Manassas Park, Virginia 14,273
Clarke County, Virginia 14,034
City of Falls Church, Virginia 12,332
Baltimore-Towson, MD MSA 2,658,405 Baltimore County, Maryland 805,029
Baltimore City, Maryland 620,961
Anne Arundel County, Maryland 537,656
Howard County, Maryland 287,085
Harford County, Maryland 244,826
Carroll County, Maryland 167,134
Queen Anne's County, Maryland 47,798
Winchester, VA-WV MSA 128,472 Frederick County, Virginia 78,305
City of Winchester, Virginia 26,203
Hampshire County, West Virginia 23,964
Lexington Park, MD μSA 98,854 St. Mary's County, Maryland 98,854
Culpeper, VA μSA 46,689 Culpeper County, Virginia 46,689
District of Columbia 601,723

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB) defines a metropolitan statistical area (MSA) as a core based statistical area having at least one urbanized area of 50,000 or more population, plus adjacent territory that has a high degree of social and economic integration with the core as measured by commuting ties.
  2. ^ The United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB) defines a micropolitan statistical area (μSA) as a core based statistical area having at least one urban cluster of at least 10,000 but less than 50,000 population, plus adjacent territory that has a high degree of social and economic integration with the core as measured by commuting ties.
  3. ^ The United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB) defines a combined statistical area (CSA) as an aggregate of adjacent core based statistical areas that are linked by commuting ties.
  4. ^ a b c "OMB Bulletin No. 10-02: Update of Statistical Area Definitions and Guidance on Their Uses". United States Office of Management and Budget. December 1, 2009. Retrieved August 8, 2012. 
  5. ^ An area in a nearby state and its population are displayed in green. An area that extends into nearby states is displayed in teal. A teal population number over a black population number show the total population versus the District population.
  6. ^ a b c d "American Factfinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 21, 2012. 
  7. ^ The United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB) defines a core based statistical area as one or more adjacent counties or county-equivalents having at least one urban cluster of at least 10,000 population, plus adjacent territory that has a high degree of social and economic integration with the core as measured by commuting ties. The core based statistical areas comprise the metropolitan statistical areas and the micropolitan statistical areas.

External links[edit]